Publications by authors named "Yingfen Li"

5 Publications

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Controlled Sputtering Pressure on High-Quality SbSe Thin Film for Substrate Configurated Solar Cells.

Nanomaterials (Basel) 2020 Mar 22;10(3). Epub 2020 Mar 22.

Shenzhen Key Laboratory of Advanced Thin Films and Applications, Key Laboratory of Optoelectronic Devices and Systems of Ministry of Education and Guangdong Province, College of Physics and Optoelectronic Engineering, Shenzhen University, Shenzhen 518060, China.

Magnetron sputtering has become an effective method in SbSe thin film photovoltaic. Research found that post-selenization treatments are essential to produce stoichiometric thin films with desired crystallinity and orientation for the sputtered SbSe. However, the influence of the sputtering process on SbSe device performance has rarely been explored. In this work, the working pressure effect was thoroughly studied for the sputtered SbSe thin film solar cells. High-quality SbSe thin film was obtained when a bilayer structure was applied by sputtering the film at a high (1.5 Pa) and a low working pressure (1.0 Pa) subsequently. Such bilayer structure was found to be beneficial for both crystallization and preferred orientation of the SbSe thin film. Lastly, an interesting power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 5.5% was obtained for the champion device.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/nano10030574DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7153377PMC
March 2020

An alternative approach for nitrate and arsenic removal from wastewater via a nitrate-dependent ferrous oxidation process.

J Environ Manage 2018 Aug 21;220:246-252. Epub 2018 May 21.

Department of Environmental Science and Engineering, College of Natural Resource and Environment, South China Agricultural University, Guangzhou 510642, China.

Owing to the high efficiency of converting nitrate to nitrogen gas with ferrous iron as the electron donor, the process of nitrate-dependent ferrous oxidation (NDFeO) has been considered suitable to treat wastewater that contains nitrate but lacks organic matter. Meanwhile, arsenic immobilization often has been found during the NDFeO reaction. Thus, it was strongly expected that nitrate and arsenic could be removed simultaneously in co-contaminated wastewater through the NDFeO process. However, in the current work, arsenic was not removed during the NDFeO process when the pH was high (above 8), though the nitrate reduction rate was over 90%. Meanwhile, the biosolid particles from the NDFeO process demonstrated strong adsorption ability for arsenic when the pH was below 6. Yet, the adsorption became weak when the pH was above 7. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy analysis revealed that the main activated component for arsenic adsorption was iron oxide in these particles, which was easily crippled under high pH conditions. These results implied that co-removal of nitrate and arsenic in wastewater treatment using NDFeO was difficult to carry out under high pH conditions. Thus, a two-step approach in which nitrate was removed first by NDFeO followed by arsenic adsorption with NDFeO biosolids was more feasible.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jenvman.2018.05.031DOI Listing
August 2018

Anesthesia with nontracheal intubation in thoracic surgery.

J Thorac Dis 2012 Apr;4(2):126-30

Objective: To study one-lung respiration during VATS wedge resection of bullae and pulmonary nodules with nontracheal intubation, and to explore the changes of vital signs when patients return to two-lung ventilation.

Methods: Twenty-two patients with normal cardiopulmonary function and absence of contraindications to epidural anesthesia were included in this study. VATS wedge resection of bullae or pulmonary nodules was performed. 0.5% Ropivacain was administrated for epidural anesthesia (T8-9), and 2 mL of 2% lidocaine was used for local anesthetic block of the intrathoracic vagus nerves. The BIS value was maintained between 50 and 70 by target-controlled infusion of propofol and remifentanil. Electrocardiogram (ECG), heart rate (HR), blood pressure (Bp), pulse oxygen saturation (SpO(2)), respiratory rate (RR), bispectral index (BIS) and urine volume were monitored.

Results: None patients were converted to endotracheal intubation during anesthesia. MAP and SpO(2) after wound disclosure were stable (P>0.05), level of CVP significantly elevated, HR and RR increased (P<0.05), PaCO(2) increased gradually while PaO(2) remained stable. Fifteen minutes after wound closure, MAP, RR and SpO(2) returned to their pre-anesthesia levels, PH value gradually recovered, PaCO(2) tended to decrease and returned to normal one hour after wound closure. Physical agitation occurred in one case due to inadequate epidural anesthesia during skin incision. Cough before intrathoracic vagal blockade was noted in two cases (9.1%) because of lobe traction.

Conclusions: Nontracheal intubation is feasible in VATS wedge resection of bullae and pulmonary nodules. The patients are with stable intraoperative vital signs and none experiences hypoxemia; intraoperative hypercapnia is tolerable and transient, which can be improved quickly when bilateral lungs resume spontaneous respiration.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3978/j.issn.2072-1439.2012.03.10DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3378229PMC
April 2012