Publications by authors named "Ying-Juan Huang"

8 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Protective effects of calorie restriction on insulin resistance and islet function in STZ-induced type 2 diabetes rats.

Nutr Metab (Lond) 2021 May 5;18(1):48. Epub 2021 May 5.

Department of Traditional Chinese Medicine, The Seventh Affiliated Hospital, Sun Yat-Sen University, Shenzhen, 518107, China.

Background: Caloric restriction (CR) has become increasingly attractive in the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) because of the increasingly common high-calorie diet and sedentary lifestyle. This study aimed to evaluate the role of CR in T2DM treatment and further explore its potential molecular mechanisms.

Methods: Sixty male Sprague-Dawley rats were used in this study. The diabetes model was induced by 8 weeks of high-fat diet (HFD) followed by a single dose of streptozotocin injection (30 mg/kg). Subsequently, the diabetic rats were fed HFD at 28 g/day (diabetic control) or 20 g/day (30% CR regimen) for 20 weeks. Meanwhile, normal rats fed a free standard chow diet served as the vehicle control. Body mass, plasma glucose levels, and lipid profiles were monitored. After diabetes-related functional tests were performed, the rats were sacrificed at 10 and 20 weeks, and glucose uptake in fresh muscle was determined. In addition, western blotting and immunofluorescence were used to detect alterations in AKT/AS160/GLUT4 signaling.

Results: We found that 30% CR significantly attenuated hyperglycemia and dyslipidemia, leading to alleviation of glucolipotoxicity and thus protection of islet function. Insulin resistance was also markedly ameliorated, as indicated by notably improved insulin tolerance and homeostatic model assessment for insulin resistance (HOMA-IR). However, the improvement in glucose uptake in skeletal muscle was not significant. The upregulation of AKT/AS160/GLUT4 signaling in muscle induced by 30% CR also attenuated gradually over time. Interestingly, the consecutive decrease in AKT/AS160/GLUT4 signaling in white adipose tissue was significantly reversed by 30% CR.

Conclusion: CR (30%) could protect islet function from hyperglycemia and dyslipidemia, and improve insulin resistance. The mechanism by which these effects occurred is likely related to the upregulation of AKT/AS160/GLUT4 signaling.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12986-021-00575-yDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8097947PMC
May 2021

Skin-patch of Xin Huang Pian on relieving joint symptoms in patients with acute gouty arthritis: A Randomized, Double-Blind, Active-Controlled Trial.

J Adv Nurs 2020 Jun 14;76(6):1416-1424. Epub 2020 Apr 14.

Department of Traditional Chinese Medicine, the First Affiliated Hospital, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, P.R. China.

Aims: To evaluate the effectiveness and safety of Xin Huang Pian skin patches for patients with acute gouty arthritis.

Background: In China, patients with acute gouty arthritis benefit from skin patcheses with herbal medicines. But the clinical effects of skin patches with Xin Huang Pian are rarely reported.

Design: A Randomized, Double-Blind, Active-Controlled Trial.

Methods: The trial was performed from January 2015-December 2018 at the First Affiliated Hospital of Sun Yat-sen University in China. It was conducted with one intervention group (skin patches of Xin Huang Pian, N = 30) and one active control group (skin patches of Diclofenac Diethylamine Emulgel, N = 31). Participants and study investigators were both blinded to the treatment assignments. The primary outcomes were the improvement of joints' symptoms. The secondary outcomes were changes in white blood cells, erythrocyte sedimentation rate and C-reactive protein.

Results: Skin patches of Xin Huang Pian showed quick effect on decreasing joint pain at 3rd day of treatment. Wherever only at 7th day, Diclofenac Diethylamine Emulgel markedly lowered joint pain. Xin Huang Pian also showed superior effect than Diclofenac Diethylamine Emulgel on improving joint swelling and range of motion and decreasing the levels of C-reactive protein and erythrocyte sedimentation rate. No adverse reactions were observed in skin patches of Xin Huang Pian treatment.

Conclusion: Skin patches of Xin Huang Pian appeared to be safe and efficacious for relieving joint symptoms in patients with acute gouty arthritis. The mechanism might be associated with the decreased levels of C-reactive protein and erythrocyte sedimentation rate.

Impact: Skin-patcheses with Xin Huang Pian are more effective than Diclofenac Diethylamine Emulgel on improving joint pain, swelling and range of motion. Xin Huang Pian treatment showed superior effects compared with Diclofenac Diethylamine Emulgel on decreasing levels of C-reactive protein and erythrocyte sedimentation rate. Patients with acute gouty arthritis may benefit from skin patches of Xin Huang Pian for effective relief from joint pain and swelling. Chinese Clinical Trial Registration: ChiCTR-TRC-1300 4122.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/jan.14338DOI Listing
June 2020

Lingguizhugan decoction attenuates diet-induced obesity and hepatosteatosis gut microbiota.

World J Gastroenterol 2019 Jul;25(27):3590-3606

Department of Traditional Chinese Medicine, the First Affiliated Hospital of Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou 510080, Guangdong Province, China.

Background: Obesity is a major risk factor for a variety of diseases such as diabetes, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, and cardiovascular diseases. Restricting energy intake, or caloric restriction (CR), can reduce body weight and improve metabolic parameters in overweight or obese patients. We previously found that Lingguizhugan decoction (LZD) in combination with CR can effectively lower plasma lipid levels in patients with metabolic syndrome. However, the mechanism underlying CR and LZD treatment is still unclear.

Aim: To investigate whether CR and LZD improve metabolic parameters by modulating gut microbiota.

Methods: We extracted the water-soluble components out of raw materials and dried as LZD extracts. Eight-week old male C57BL/6 mice were treated with a 3-d treatment regime that included 24 h-fasting followed by gavage of LZD extracts for 2 consecutive days, followed by a normal diet (ND) for 16 wk. To test the effects of gut microbiota on diet-induced obesity, 8-wk old male C57BL/6 mice received fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) from CR and LZD-treated mice every 3 d and were fed with high-fat diet (HFD) for 16 wk. Control mice received either saline gavage or FMT from ND-fed mice receiving saline gavage as mentioned above. Body weight was monitored bi-weekly. Food consumption of each cage hosting five mice was recorded weekly. To monitor blood glucose, total cholesterol, and total triglycerides, blood samples were collected submandibular bleeding after 6 h fasting. Oxygen consumption rate was monitored with metabolic cages. Feces were collected, and fecal DNA was extracted. Profiles of gut microbiota were mapped by metagenomic sequencing.

Results: We found that CR and LZD treatment significantly reduced the body weight of mice fed with ND (28.71 ± 0.29 28.05 ± 0.15, < 0.05), but did not affect plasma total cholesterol or total triglyceride levels. We then transplanted the fecal microbiota collected from CR and LZD-treated mice under ND feeding to HFD-fed mice. Intriguingly, transplanting the mice with fecal microbiota from CR and LZD-treated mice potently reduced body weight (44.95 ± 1.02 40.53 ± 0.97, < 0.001). FMT also reduced HFD-induced hepatosteatosis, in addition to improved glycemic control. Mechanistic studies found that FMT increased OCR of the mice and suppressed the expression and protein abundance of lipogenic genes in the liver. Metagenomic analysis revealed that HFD drastically altered the profile of gut microbiota, and FMT modified the profile of the gut microbiota.

Conclusion: Our study suggests that CR and LZD improve metabolic parameters by modulating gut microbiota.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3748/wjg.v25.i27.3590DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6658390PMC
July 2019

Caloric restriction ameliorates acrolein-induced neurotoxicity in rats.

Neurotoxicology 2018 03 31;65:44-51. Epub 2018 Jan 31.

Department of Traditional Chinese Medicine, The First Affiliated Hospital, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou 510080, China; Department of Traditional Chinese Medicine, The Seventh Affiliated Hospital, Sun Yat-Sen University, Shenzhen 518107, China. Electronic address:

Objective: Acrolein, a highly reactive unsaturated aldehyde, is a ubiquitous environmental pollutant and oxidative damage induced by acrolein is hypothesized to involve in the etiology of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Calorie restriction (CR) is the only non-genetic intervention that has consistently been verified to retard aging by ameliorating oxidative stress. Therefore, we investigated the effects of CR on acrolein-induced neurotoxicity in Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats.

Methods: A total of 45 weaned and specific-pathogen-free SD rats (male, weighing 180-220 g) were gavage-fed with acrolein (2.5 mg/kg/day) and fed ab libitum of 10 g/day or 7 g/day (representing 30% CR regimen), or gavage-fed with same volume of tap water and fed al libitum as vehicle control for 12 weeks. After behavioral test conducted by Morris Water Maze, SD rats were sacrificed and brain tissues were prepared for histochemical evaluation and Western blotting to detect alterations in oxidative stress, BDNF/TrkB pathway and key enzymes involved in amyloid precursor protein (APP) metabolism.

Results: Treatment with 30% CR in SD rats significantly attenuated acrolein-induced cognitive impairment. Oxidative damage including deletion of glutathione and superoxide dismutase and sharp rise in malondialdehyde were notably improved by 30% CR. Further study suggested that 30% CR showed protective effects against acrolein by modulating BDNF/TrkB signaling pathways. Moreover, 30% CR restored acrolein-induced changes of APP, β-secretase, α-secretase and receptor for advanced glycation end products.

Conclusion: These findings suggest that CR may provide a promising approach for the treatment of AD, targeting acrolein.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.neuro.2018.01.003DOI Listing
March 2018

Effect of alternate-day fasting therapy combined with Linggui Zhugan Decoction () on hepatic oxidative stress in hyperlipidemic rat.

Chin J Integr Med 2015 Jan 14. Epub 2015 Jan 14.

Department of Traditional Chinese Medicine, the First Affiliated Hospital of Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, 510080, China.

Objective: To observe the effect of alternate-day fasting (ADF) therapy combined with Linggui Zhugan Decoction (, LZD) on hepatic oxidative stress and blood lipids in hyperlipidemic rats.

Methods: Fifty-two Wistar rats were randomly assigned to two groups: the high-fat-diet (HF) group and the normal-diet (ND) group. Hyperlipidemia was induced by feeding rats with high-cholesterol-diet for 5 weeks. Then the HF group was randomized to the model-control (MC) group, the alternate-day-fasting (ADF) group, and the ADF combined with LZD (AL) group. The ND group was regarded as the negative control (NC) group. The AL and ADF groups were put on fast for 24 h on alternate days for 4 weeks. The AL group was administrated with LZD on the fast days. Body weight and food intake were measured once a week. After 4-week ADF, blood sample was collected for determination of plasma total cholesterol (TC), triglyceride (TG), low-density-lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) and high-density-lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C). Liver oxidative stress parameters including total superoxide dismutase (T-SOD) activity, malondialdehyde (MDA) level and glutathione (GSH) content were also tested.

Results: Body weight in the HF group decreased significantly (P<0.01). TC, TG, HDL-C, and LDL-C concentrations in the HF group were higher than those in the NC group (P<0.01), respectively. T-SOD in the HF group was clearly lower than that in the NC group (P<0.05). After 4-week intervention, body weight, TC and TG concentrations in the ADF and AL groups declined significantly, respectively, compared to MC group (P<0.05). GSH in the ADF and AL groups were much higher than those in the MC group (P<0.01). MDA level was also greatly higher in the ADF group as compared with the NC group (P<0.05).

Conclusion: ADF therapy combined with LZD may be used as an effective combination approach for treatment of hyperlipidemia and oxidative stress damage.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11655-014-1999-8DOI Listing
January 2015

L-carnitine ameliorated fasting-induced fatigue, hunger, and metabolic abnormalities in patients with metabolic syndrome: a randomized controlled study.

Nutr J 2014 Nov 26;13:110. Epub 2014 Nov 26.

Department of Traditional Chinese Medicine, First Affiliated Hospital of Sun Yat-Sen University, No, 58 Zhongshan 2nd Road, Guangzhou 510080, China.

Background: The present study aimed to determine that whether L-carnitine infusion could ameliorate fasting-induced adverse effects and improve outcomes.

Method: In this 7-day, randomized, single-blind, placebo-controlled, pilot study, 15 metabolic syndrome (MetS) patients (11/4 F/M; age 46.9 ± 9.14 years; body mass index [BMI] 28.2 ± 1.8 kg/m2) were in the L-carnitine group (LC) and 15 (10/5 F/M; age 46.8 ± 10.9 years; BMI 27.1 ± 2.3 kg/m2) were in the control group (CT). All participants underwent a 5-day modified fasting therapy introduced with 2-day moderate calorie restriction. Patients in the LC group received 4 g/day of intravenous L-carnitine, while patients in the CT group were injected with saline. Blood pressure (BP), anthropometric characteristics, markers of liver function, metabolic indices (plasma glucose, lipid profiles, uric acid, free fatty acid and insulin) and hypersensitivity C-reactive protein were measured. Perceived hunger was recorded daily by self-rating visual analogue scales. Fatigue was evaluated by Wessely and Powell scores.

Results: In contrast to the CT group, total cholesterol, alanine aminotransferase, systolic and diastolic BP did not change significantly in the LC group after prolonged fasting. There were significant differences in weight loss (LC -4.6 ± 0.9 vs. CT -3.2 ± 1.1 kg, P = 0.03), and waist circumference (LC -5.0 ± 2.2 vs. CT -1.7 ± 1.16 cm, P < 0.001), waist hip ratio (LC -0.023 ± 0.017 vs. CT 0.012 ± 0.01, P < 0.001), insulin concentration (LC -9.9 ± 3.58 vs. CT -6.32 ± 3.44 µU/mL, P = 0.046), and γ-glutamyltransferase concentration (LC -7.07 ± 6.82 vs. CT -2.07 ± 4.18, P = 0.024). Perceived hunger scores were significantly increased (P < 0.05) in the CT group during starvation, which was alleviated with L-carnitine administration in the LC group. Physical fatigue (LC -3.2 ± 3.17 vs. CT 1.8 ± 2.04, P < 0.001) and fatigue severity (LC -11.6 ± 8.38 vs. CT 8.18 ± 7.32, P < 0.001) were significantly reduced in the LC group but were aggravated in the CT group.

Conclusion: Intravenous L-carnitine can ameliorate fasting-induced hunger, fatigue, cholesterol abnormalities and hepatic metabolic changes and facilitate fasting-induced weight loss in MetS patients.

Trial Registration: ChiCTR-TNRC-12002835.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1475-2891-13-110DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4258024PMC
November 2014

Acrolein induces Alzheimer's disease-like pathologies in vitro and in vivo.

Toxicol Lett 2013 Mar 4;217(3):184-91. Epub 2013 Jan 4.

Department of Traditional Chinese Medicine, The First Affiliated Hospital, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou 510080, China.

The pathologic mechanisms of Alzheimer's disease (AD) have not been fully uncovered. Acrolein, a ubiquitous dietary pollutant and by-product of oxidative stress, can induce cytotoxicity in neurons, which might play an important role in the etiology of AD. Here, we examined the effects of Acrolein on the AD pathologies in vitro and in vivo. We found Acrolein induced HT22 cells death in concentration- and time-dependent manners. Interestingly, Acrolein increased proteins' levels of amyloid precursor protein (APP), β-secretase (BACE-1) and the amyloid β-peptide transporter receptor for advanced glycation end products, and decreased A-disintegrin and metalloprotease (ADAM) 10 levels. In vivo, chronic oral exposure to Acrolein (2.5 mg/kg/day by intragastric gavage for 8 weeks) induced mild cognitive declination and pyknosis/atrophy of hippocampal neurons. The activity of superoxide dismutase was down-regulated while the level of malondialdehyde was up-regulated in rat brain. Moreover, Acrolein resulted in activation of astrocytes, up-regulation of BACE-1 in cortex and down-regulation of ADAM-10 in hippocampus and cortex. Taken together, our findings suggest that exposure to Acrolein induces AD-like pathology in vitro and in vivo. Scavenging Acrolein might be beneficial for the therapy of AD.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.toxlet.2012.12.023DOI Listing
March 2013

Effects of the modified linggui zhugan decoction (see text) combined with short-term very low calorie diets on glycemic control in newly diagnosed type 2 diabetics.

J Tradit Chin Med 2011 Sep;31(3):185-8

Department of Chinese Medicine, First Affiliated Hospital of Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou, Guangdong 510080, China.

Objective: To evaluate the effects of the modified Linggui Zhugan Decoction (see text) combined with short-term very low calorie diets (VLCDs) on glycemic control in newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) patients.

Methods: A total of 20 subjects with newly diagnosed T2DM were treated with the modified Linggui Zhugan Decoction (one-month administration) combined with short-term VLCDs (5 days), and 3-months follow-up. A standard 75-g oral-glucose-tolerance test (OGTT) indexes fasting plasma glucose (FPG), post-prandial 0.5 h and 2 h plasma glucose (P0.5hPG, P2hPG), glycated hemoglobin A(1c) (GHbA(1c)), body weight, body mass index (BMI), insulin function, insulin resistance index, incidence of hypoglycemia, and the liver and renal functions were evaluated before and after treatment. Correlations of BMI with insulin function and insulin resistance were also assessed.

Results: After the treatment, the patients' plasma glucose decreased steadily, FPG decreased from 5.8 +/- 0.9 mmol/L at pre-treatment to 5.0 +/- 0.6 mmol/L at 3-months follow-up (P < 0.05), and P2hPG decreased from 11.7 +/- 3.8 mmol/L at pre-treatment to 6.9 +/- 0.9 mmol/L at 3-months follow-up (P < 0.01). The level of GHbA(1c) declined from (6.47 +/- 1.24)% at pre-treatment to (6.14 +/- 0.99)% at 3-months follow-up (P < 0.01). Body weight and BMI also declined significantly. Insulin resistance index was improved obviously and no event of hypoglycemia occurred. Part of the patients companied with fatty liver had a transient increase in hepatic transaminase during the treatment, but it turned to normal after the treatment.

Conclusions: The modified Linggui Zhugan Decoction combined with short-term VLCDs can be safely implemented for steady glycemic control in newly diagnosed T2DM patients.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/s0254-6272(11)60038-1DOI Listing
September 2011