Publications by authors named "Yi-Neng Zheng"

6 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Significance of intra-nodular vessel sign in differentiating benign and malignant pulmonary ground-glass nodules.

Insights Imaging 2021 May 26;12(1):65. Epub 2021 May 26.

Department of Radiology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, 1# Youyi Road, Yuanjiagang, Yuzhong District, Chongqing, 400016, China.

Background: The presence of pulmonary vessels inside ground-glass nodules (GGNs) of different nature is a very common occurrence. This study aimed to reveal the significance of pulmonary vessels displayed in GGNs in their diagnosis and differential diagnosis.

Results: A total of 149 malignant and 130 benign GGNs confirmed by postoperative pathological examination were retrospectively enrolled in this study. There were significant differences in size, shape, nodule-lung interface, pleural traction, lobulation, and spiculation (each p < 0.05) between benign and malignant GGNs. Compared with benign GGNs, intra-nodular vessels were more common in malignant GGNs (67.79% vs. 54.62%, p = 0.024), while the vascular categories were similar (p = 0.663). After adjusting the nodule size and the distance between the nodule center and adjacent pleura [radius-distance ratio, RDR], the occurrences of internal vessels between them were similar. The number of intra-nodular vessels was positively correlated with nodular diameter and RDR. Vascular changes were more common in malignant than benign GGNs (52.48% vs. 18.31%, p < 0.0001), which mainly manifested as distortion and/or dilation of pulmonary veins (61.19%). The occurrence rate, number, and changes of internal vessels had no significant differences among all the pre-invasive and invasive lesions (each p > 0.05).

Conclusions: The incidence of internal vessels in GGNs is mainly related to their size and the distance between nodule and pleura rather than the pathological nature. However, GGNs with dilated or distorted internal vessels, especially pulmonary veins, have a higher possibility of malignancy.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13244-021-01012-7DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8155149PMC
May 2021

Intraventricular Hemorrhage Growth: Definition, Prevalence and Association with Hematoma Expansion and Prognosis.

Neurocrit Care 2020 12;33(3):732-739

Department of Neurology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing, 400016, China.

Background/objectives: The objective of this study is to propose a definition of intraventricular hemorrhage (IVH) growth and to investigate whether IVH growth is associated with ICH expansion and functional outcome.

Methods: We performed a prospective observational study of ICH patients between July 2011 and March 2017 in a tertiary hospital. Patients were included if they had a baseline CT scan within 6 h after onset of symptoms and a follow-up CT within 36 h. IVH growth was defined as either any newly occurring intraventricular bleeding on follow-up CT scan in patients without baseline IVH or an increase in IVH volume ≥ 1 mL on follow-up CT scan in patients with initial IVH. Poor outcome was defined as modified Rankin Scale score of 3-6 at 90 days. The association between IVH growth and functional outcome was assessed by using multivariable logistic regression analysis.

Results: IVH growth was observed in 59 (19.5%) of 303 patients. Patients with IVH growth had larger baseline hematoma volume, higher NIHSS score and lower GCS score than those without. Of 44 patients who had concurrent IVH growth and hematoma growth, 41 (93.2%) had poor functional outcome at 3-month follow-up. IVH growth (adjusted OR 4.15, 95% CI 1.31-13.20; P = 0.016) was an independent predictor of poor functional outcome (mRS 3-6) at 3 months in multivariable analysis.

Conclusion: IVH growth is not uncommon and independently predicts poor outcome in ICH patients. It may serve as a promising therapeutic target for intervention.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12028-020-00958-8DOI Listing
December 2020

MRI evaluation of endopelvic fascial swelling and analysis of influencing factors in patients with uterine fibroids after high-intensity focused ultrasound ablation.

Int J Hyperthermia 2020 ;37(1):175-181

Therapeutic Center of Ultrasound Ablation, The First Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing, P.R. China.

To evaluate endopelvic fascial swelling in patients with uterine fibroids after high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) ablation on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and investigate the factors that influence endopelvic fascial swelling. MRI and clinical data from 188 patients with uterine fibroids who were treated with HIFU were analyzed retrospectively. The patients were divided into a fascial swelling group and a non-swelling group, and the degree of swelling was graded. Fascial swelling was set as the dependent variable, and factors such as baseline characteristics and HIFU parameters, were set as the independent variables. The relationship between these variables and fascial swelling was analyzed by univariate and multivariate analyses. Correlations between the factors and the degree of fascial swelling were evaluated by Kruskal-Wallis test. The univariate analysis revealed that the fibroid location, distance from the fibroid to the sacrum, sonication time, treatment time, treatment intensity, therapeutic dose (TD), and energy efficiency (EEF) all affected the endopelvic fascial swelling ( < 0.05). Subsequently, multivariate analysis showed that the distance from the fibroid to the sacrum was significantly correlated with fascial swelling ( < 0.05). Moreover, TD and sonication time were significantly positively correlated with the degree of fascial swelling ( < 0.05). The incidence of sacrococcygeal pain was significantly correlated with fascial swelling ( < 0.05). The distance from the fibroid to the sacrum was a protective factor for fascial swelling. TD and sonication time were significantly positively correlated with the degree of fascial swelling.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/02656736.2019.1701100DOI Listing
October 2020

Primary solid lung cancerous nodules with different sizes: computed tomography features and their variations.

BMC Cancer 2019 Nov 7;19(1):1060. Epub 2019 Nov 7.

Department of Radiology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, 1# Youyi Road, Yuanjiagang, Yuzhong district, Chongqing, China.

Background: The computed tomography (CT) features of small solid lung cancers and their changing regularity as they grow have not been well studied. The purpose of this study was to analyze the CT features of solid lung cancerous nodules (SLCNs) with different sizes and their variations.

Methods: Between February 2013 and April 2018, a consecutive cohort of 224 patients (225 nodules) with confirmed primary SLCNs was enrolled. The nodules were divided into four groups based on tumor diameter (A: diameter ≤ 1.0 cm, 35 lesions; B: 1.0 cm < diameter ≤ 1.5 cm, 60 lesions; C: 1.5 cm < diameter ≤ 2.0 cm, 63 lesions; and D: 2.0 cm < diameter ≤ 3.0 cm, 67 lesions). CT features of nodules within each group were summarized and compared.

Results: Most nodules in different groups were located in upper lobes (groups A - D:50.8%-73.1%) and had a gap from the pleura (groups A - D:89.6%-100%). The main CT features of smaller (diameter ≤ 1 cm) and larger (diameter > 1 cm) nodules were significantly different. As nodule diameter increased, more lesions showed a regular shape, homogeneous density, clear but coarse tumor-lung interface, lobulation, spiculation, spinous protuberance, vascular convergence, pleural retraction, bronchial truncation, and beam-shaped opacity (p < 0.05 for all). The presence of halo sign in all groups was similar (17.5%-22.5%; p > 0.05).

Conclusions: The CT features vary among SLCNs with different sizes. Understanding their changing regularity is helpful for identifying smaller suspicious malignant nodules and early determining their nature in follow-up.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12885-019-6274-0DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6836448PMC
November 2019

Effect of Slab Thickness on the Detection of Pulmonary Nodules by Use of CT Maximum and Minimum Intensity Projection.

AJR Am J Roentgenol 2019 09 7;213(3):562-567. Epub 2019 May 7.

Department of Radiology, First Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, 1 Youyi Rd, Yuanjiagang, Yuzhong, Chongqing 40016, China.

The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of slab thickness on the detection of pulmonary nodules by use of maximum-intensity-projection (MIP) and minimum-intensity-projection (MinIP) to process CT images. Chest CT data of 221 patients with pulmonary nodules were retrospectively analyzed. Nodules were categorized into two groups according to density: solid nodules (SNs) and subsolid nodules (SSNs). Pulmonary nodules were independently evaluated by two radiologists using axial CT images with 1-mm and 5-mm section thickness and MIP and MinIP images. MIP images for SN detection and MinIP images for SSN detection were separately reconstructed with four (5, 10, 15, 20 mm) and three (3, 8, 15 mm) slab thicknesses. The numbers and locations of detected nodules were recorded, and interobserver agreement was assessed. For each reader, the differences in nodule detection rates were evaluated in different series of images. Among the different series of images, interobserver agreements for detecting nodules were all good to excellent (κ ≥ 0.687). For total SNs and SNs with a diameter < 5 mm, detection rates on 10-mm MIP images were significantly higher than in other series of images (reader 1, 84.5% and 83.8%; reader 2, 83.6% and 82.2%). For total SSNs and SSNs < 5 mm, detection rates on 3-mm MinIP images were significantly higher than those in other series of images, except for 1-mm (reader 1, 93.3% and 78.6%; reader 2, 95.0% and 81.0%). Ten-millimeter MIP images are extremely efficient for detecting SNs. Three-millimeter MinIP images are more useful for visualizing SSNs, the efficiency being comparable to that achieved by use of 1-mm axial images.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.2214/AJR.19.21325DOI Listing
September 2019

[Changes of some biochemical markers and cardiac function in New Zealand rabbits with chronic heart failure].

Zhongguo Ying Yong Sheng Li Xue Za Zhi 2018 Jan;34(1):74-77

College of Bioengineering, Chongqing University, Chongqing Engineering Research Center for Medical Electronic Technology, Chongqing 400044, China.

Objective: This article investigated the changes of some biochemical markers and cardiac function in chronic heart failure (CHF), and provided the basis for the diagnosis of CHF.

Methods: New Zealand rabbit CHF model was established using adriamycin (ADR). Twenty New Zealand rabbits were randomly divided into model group (=15) and control group (=5), injected with ADR and saline solution the ear vein respectively, 2 times a week, lasting for 8 weeks. After that, myocardial enzymes, carotid artery pressure, echocardiogram (ECG) and phonocardiogram (PCG) of all New Zealand rabbits were detected and recorded.

Results: Compared with control group, all parameters of the model group were changed significantly (<0.05).

Conclusions: CHF leads to myocardial damage in New Zealand rabbits, decreased systolic and diastolic function, cardiac reserve index can be used to assess cardiac function.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.12047/j.cjap.5534.2018.019DOI Listing
January 2018