Publications by authors named "Yi-Hsien Teng"

4 Publications

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Heparan sulfate targeting strategy for enhancing liposomal drug accumulation and facilitating deep distribution in tumors.

Drug Deliv 2020 Dec;27(1):542-555

Institute of Molecular and Cellular Biology, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu, Taiwan.

Nanoparticles (NPs), such as liposomes, effectively evade the severe toxicity of unexpected accumulation and passively shuttle drugs into tumor tissues by enhanced permeability and retention. In the case of non-small cell lung cancer and pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma, cancer-associated fibroblasts promote the aggregation of a gel-like extracellular matrix that forms a physical barrier in the desmoplastic stroma of the tumor. These stroma are composed of protein networks and glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) that greatly compromise tumor-penetrating performance, leading to insufficient extravasation and tissue penetration of NPs. Moreover, the presence of heparan sulfate (HS) and related proteoglycans on the cell surface and tumor extracellular matrix may serve as molecular targets for NP-mediated drug delivery. Here, a GAG-binding peptide (GBP) with high affinity for HS and high cell-penetrating activity was used to develop an HS-targeting delivery system. Specifically, liposomal doxorubicin (L-DOX) was modified by post-insertion with the GBP. We show that the uptake of L-DOX in A549 lung adenocarcinoma cells increased by GBP modification. Cellular uptake of GBP-modified L-DOX (L-DOX-GBP) was diminished in the presence of extracellular HS but not in the presence of other GAGs, indicating that the interaction with HS is critical for the cell surface binding of L-DOX-GBP. The cytotoxicity of doxorubicin positively correlated with the molecular composition of GBP. Moreover, GBP modification improved the distribution and anticancer efficiency of L-DOX, with enhanced desmoplastic targeting and extensive distribution. Taken together, GBP modification may greatly improve the tissue distribution and delivery efficiency of NPs against HS-abundant desmoplastic stroma-associated neoplasm.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/10717544.2020.1745326DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7170378PMC
December 2020

Low-level laser therapy prevents endothelial cells from TNF-α/cycloheximide-induced apoptosis.

Lasers Med Sci 2018 Feb 3;33(2):279-286. Epub 2017 Nov 3.

Department of Physical Therapy and Graduate Institute of Rehabilitation Science, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan.

Low-level laser therapy (LLLT), widely used in physiotherapy, has been known to enhance wound healing and stimulate cell proliferation, including fibroblast and endothelial cells. Applying LLLT can increase cell proliferation in many kinds of cells including fibroblasts and endothelial cells. However, the protective mechanisms of LLLT on endothelial apoptosis remain unclear. We hypothesized LLLT can protect endothelial cells from inflammation-induced apoptosis. Human endothelial cell line, EA.hy926 cells, and TNF-α/cycloheximide (TNF/CHX) were used to explore the protective effects of LLLT (660 nm) on inflammation-induced endothelial apoptosis. Cell viability, apoptosis, caspase-3/7/8/9 activity, MAPKs signaling, NF-κB activity, and inducible/endothelial nitric oxide synthase (iNOS/eNOS) expression were measured. Our results showed that LLLT increased EA.hy926 cell proliferation, attenuated the TNF/CHX-induced apoptosis, and reduced the TNF/CHX-mediated caspase-3/7/8/9 activation. In addition, LLLT increased ERK MAPK phosphorylation and suppressed the TNF/CHX-increased p38 MAPK, JNK, IKK phosphorylation, NF-κB translocation, and iNOS expression. The caspases-3 cleavage and cell death were not increased in cells treating with ERK inhibitor U0126, which implicated that ERK is not to be responsible for the protective effects of LLLT. After treating with p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) activator, the protection of LLLT in cell apoptosis was no longer existed, showing that LLLT protected the endothelial cells by suppressing p38 MAPK signaling. Our results provide a new insight into the possible molecular mechanisms in which LLLT protects against inflammatory-induced endothelial dysfunction.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10103-017-2364-xDOI Listing
February 2018

Antagonistic interaction between cordyceps sinensis and exercise on protection in fulminant hepatic failure.

Am J Chin Med 2014 ;42(5):1199-213

Department of Physical Therapy and Graduate Institute of Rehabilitation Science, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan, ROC.

Herb supplements are widely used by Asian athletes; however, there are no studies evaluated the co-effects of exercise and herb supplements on hepatic failure. In this study, D-GalN/LPS-induced fulminant hepatic failure was used to examine whether there are synergistic or antagonistic effects of exercise and Cordyceps sinensis (CS). Mice were randomly divided into eight groups: control, swimming exercise for four weeks, D-GalN/LPS challenge, swimming exercise plus D-GalN/LPS, 20 mg/kg or 40 mg/kg CS pretreated for four weeks plus D-GalN/LPS, and swimming exercise combined with 20 mg/kg or 40 mg/kg CS pretreatment plus D-GalN/LPS. Either exercise or 40 mg/kg CS pretreatment alone significantly decreased D-GalN/LPS-induced TNF-α, AST, NO, apoptotic-related proteins, and hepatocyte apoptosis. Exercise or 40 mg/kg CS alone increased the IL-10 and D-GalN/LPS-suppressed Superoxide Dismutase (SOD) level. However, no protective or worse effect was observed in the mice treated with exercise preconditioning combined 40 mg/kg CS compared to those receive exercise alone or CS alone. TNF-α, AST, NO level, caspase-3 activity, and hepatocytes apoptosis were not significantly different in the exercise combined with 40 mg/kg CS compared to mice challenged with D-GalN/LPS. The IL-10 level was significantly decreased after D-GalN/LPS stimulation in the mice received exercise combined with 40 mg/kg CS, indicating the combination strongly reduced the anti-inflammatory effect. In summary, preconditioning exercise or CS pretreatment alone can protect mice from septic liver damage, but in contrast, the combination of exercise and CS does not produce any benefit. The antagonistic interactions between exercise and CS imply taking CS is not recommended for people who undertake regular exercise.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1142/S0192415X1450075XDOI Listing
March 2015

Cordyceps sinensis prevents apoptosis in mouse liver with D-galactosamine/lipopolysaccharide-induced fulminant hepatic failure.

Am J Chin Med 2014 ;42(2):427-41

Department of Physical Therapy and Graduate Institute of Rehabilitation Science, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan.

Cordyceps sinensis (C. sinensis) has long been considered to be an herbal medicine and has been used in the treatment of various inflammatory diseases. The present study examined the cytoprotective properties of C. sinensis on D(+)-galactosamine (GalN)/lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced fulminant hepatic failure. Mice were randomly assigned into control, GalN/LPS, CS 20 mg and CS 40 mg groups (C. sinensis, oral gavage, five days/week, four weeks). After receiving saline or C. sinensis, mice were intraperitoneally given GalN (800 mg/kg)/LPS (10 μg/kg). The effects of C. sinensis on TNF-α, IL-10, AST, NO, SOD, and apoptoticrelated proteins after the onset of endotoxin intoxication were determined. Data demonstrated that GalN/LPS increased hepatocyte degeneration, circulating AST, TNF-α, IL-10, and hepatic apoptosis and caspase activity. C. sinensis pre-treatment reduced AST, TNF-α, and NO and increased IL-10 and SOD in GalN/LPS induced fulminant hepatic failure. C. sinensis attenuated the apoptosis of hepatocytes, as evidenced by the TUNEL and capase-3, 6 activity analyses. In summary, C. sinensis alleviates GalN/LPS-induced liver injury by modulating the cytokine response and inhibiting apoptosis.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1142/S0192415X14500281DOI Listing
October 2014