Publications by authors named "Yesim Uygun"

2 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation as a bridge to lung transplantation in a Turkish lung transplantation program: our initial experience.

J Artif Organs 2021 Mar 27;24(1):36-43. Epub 2020 Aug 27.

Thoracic Surgery, Kartal Kosuyolu Training and Research Hospital, K Blok Cevizli, Kartal, Istanbul, Turkey.

Lung transplantation is a life-saving treatment for patients with end-stage lung disease. Although the number of lung transplants has increased over the years, the number of available donor lungs has not increased at the same rate, leading to the death of transplant candidates on waiting lists. In this paper, we presented our initial experience with the use of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) as a bridge to lung transplantation. Between December 2016 and August 2018, we retrospectively reviewed the use of ECMO as a bridge to lung transplantation. Thirteen patients underwent preparative ECMO for bridging to lung transplantation, and seven patients successfully underwent bridging to lung transplantation. The average age of the patients was 45.7 years (range, 19-62 years). The ECMO support period lasted 3-55 days (mean, 18.7 days; median, 13 days). In seven patients, bridging to lung transplantation was performed successfully. The mean age of patients was 49.8 years (range 42-62). Bridging time was 3-55 days (mean, 19 days; median, 13 days). Two patients died in the early postoperative period. Five patients survived until discharge from the hospital. One-year survival was achieved in four patients. ECMO can be used safely for a long time to meet the physiological needs of critically ill patients. The use of ECMO as a bridge to lung transplantation is an acceptable treatment option to reduce the number of deaths on the waiting list. Despite the successful results achieved, this approach still involves risks and complications.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10047-020-01204-wDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7450232PMC
March 2021

Treatment of ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) caused by Acinetobacter: results of prospective and multicenter ID-IRI study.

Eur J Clin Microbiol Infect Dis 2020 Jan 9;39(1):45-52. Epub 2019 Sep 9.

Vall d'Hebron Institute of Research, CIBERES, Barcelona, Spain.

Ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) due to Acinetobacter spp. is one of the most common infections in the intensive care unit. Hence, we performed this prospective-observational multicenter study, and described the course and outcome of the disease. This study was performed in 24 centers between January 06, 2014, and December 02, 2016. The patients were evaluated at time of pneumonia diagnosis, when culture results were available, and at 72 h, at the 7th day, and finally at the 28th day of follow-up. Patients with coexistent infections were excluded and only those with a first VAP episode were enrolled. Logistic regression analysis was performed. A total of 177 patients were included; empiric antimicrobial therapy was appropriate (when the patient received at least one antibiotic that the infecting strain was ultimately shown to be susceptible) in only 69 (39%) patients. During the 28-day period, antibiotics were modified for side effects in 27 (15.2%) patients and renal dose adjustment was made in 38 (21.5%). Ultimately, 89 (50.3%) patients died. Predictors of mortality were creatinine level (OR, 1.84 (95% CI 1.279-2.657); p = 0.001), fever (OR, 0.663 (95% CI 0.454-0.967); p = 0.033), malignancy (OR, 7.095 (95% CI 2.142-23.500); p = 0.001), congestive heart failure (OR, 2.341 (95% CI 1.046-5.239); p = 0.038), appropriate empiric antimicrobial treatment (OR, 0.445 (95% CI 0.216-0.914); p = 0.027), and surgery in the last month (OR, 0.137 (95% CI 0.037-0.499); p = 0.003). Appropriate empiric antimicrobial treatment in VAP due to Acinetobacter spp. was associated with survival while renal injury and comorbid conditions increased mortality. Hence, early diagnosis and appropriate antibiotic therapy remain crucial to improve outcomes.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10096-019-03691-zDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7222138PMC
January 2020