Publications by authors named "Yeol Lee"

18 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Unstable pseudoaneurysm treatment with stent graft.

J Vasc Access 2019 03 30;20(2):224-225. Epub 2018 Aug 30.

2 Department of Internal Medicine, Inha University Hospital, Inha University College of Medicine, Incheon, Korea.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1129729818788803DOI Listing
March 2019

The Value of Type IV Collagen Immunohistochemical Staining in the Differential Diagnosis of Autoimmune Subepidermal Bullous Diseases.

Acta Dermatovenerol Croat 2018 Jun;26(2):133-138

Hai-Jin Park, MD, Inje Univ. Ilsan Paik Hospital, 170 Juwha-Ro, Ilsanseo-gu, Goyang, Gyeonggi-do, Korea;

Autoimmune subepidermal bullous diseases (AISBDs) exhibit various clinical presentations, histological appearances, prognoses, and responses to treatment. Many diagnostic techniques, such as direct immunofluorescence (IF), indirect salt-split skin IF, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays, are used in the differential diagnoses of AISBDs. However, these techniques require fresh frozen tissue, expensive laboratory equipment, and sophisticated laboratory techniques. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the value of type IV collagen immunohistochemical (IHC) staining for the differential diagnosis of AISBDs. Paraffin-embedded blocks of skin biopsies were selected from 28 patients with autoimmune subepidermal bullous diseases. Among these 28 cases, 24 patients exhibited bullous pemphigoid (BP), 2 exhibited epidermolysis bullosa acquisita (EBA), 1 exhibited linear immunoglobulin A dermatosis (LAD), and 1 exhibited bullous systemic lupus erythematosus (BSLE). Sections were stained for type IV collagen and examined to determine the location of type IV collagen in the subepidermal blister. Type IV collagen positivity was observed on the base of the subepidermal blister in patients with BP (24 of 24 cases) and LAD (1 of 1 case). Staining was observed on the roof of the blister in patients with EBA (2 of 2 cases) and BSLE (1 of 1 case), and irregular staining was also observed on the base in patients with EBA. In conclusion, type IV collagen IHC staining is a simple and useful diagnostic technique for the differential diagnosis of AISBDs.
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June 2018

Outcomes of Esophageal Arterial Embolization for Treatment of Hemoptysis.

J Vasc Interv Radiol 2017 Feb 7;28(2):284-290. Epub 2016 Dec 7.

Department of Radiology, Sheikh Khalifa Specialty Hospital, Ras Al Khaimah, United Arab Emirates.

Purpose: To investigate safety and efficacy of esophageal arterial embolization (EAE) in addition to bronchial arterial embolization (BAE) for treatment of hemoptysis as well as the importance and characteristics of esophageal arteries in patients with hemoptysis.

Materials And Methods: Between January 2013 and December 2014, 20 patients (13 men and 7 women, mean age 58.4 y) underwent EAE in addition to BAE for hemoptysis. Retrospective review of patient records was performed to evaluate major causes of hemoptysis, treatment indications based on CT findings, esophageal angiography findings, and outcomes after embolization including clinical success rate and complications.

Results: Hemoptysis was caused by bronchiectasis (12 patients), tuberculosis (7 patients), and lobectomy (1 patient). CT showed lower lobe lung lesions in all (100%) patients. The esophageal arteries originated from the aorta between the carina and diaphragm (18 patients) or from the inferior phrenic arteries (2 patients) and were tortuous with longitudinal off-midline courses. Communications between the esophageal and the bronchial or inferior phrenic arteries were present in 12 patients. One patient who was treated using N-butyl cyanoacrylate developed dysphagia that resolved with medical treatment. Repeat BAE was performed in 2 patients 5 days and 20 days later, and the clinical success rate was 90% (18/20).

Conclusions: EAE in addition to BAE is safe in the treatment of hemoptysis and should be considered for lower lobe lesions.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jvir.2016.09.026DOI Listing
February 2017

Proteomic characterization of the outer membrane vesicle of Pseudomonas putida KT2440.

J Proteome Res 2014 Oct 19;13(10):4298-309. Epub 2014 Sep 19.

Division of Life Science, Korea Basic Science Institute , Daejeon 305-806, Republic of Korea.

Outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) are produced by various pathogenic Gram-negative bacteria such as Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Acinetobacter baumannii. In this study, we isolated OMVs from a representative soil bacterium, Pseudomonas putida KT2440, which has a biodegradative activity toward various aromatic compounds. Proteomic analysis identified the outer membrane proteins (OMPs) OprC, OprD, OprE, OprF, OprH, OprG, and OprW as major components of the OMV of P. putida KT2440. The production of OMVs was dependent on the nutrient availability in the culture media, and the up- or down-regulation of specific OMPs was observed according to the culture conditions. In particular, porins (e.g., benzoate-specific porin, BenF-like porin) and enzymes (e.g., catechol 1,2-dioxygenase, benzoate dioxygenase) for benzoate degradation were uniquely found in OMVs prepared from P. putida KT2440 that were cultured in media containing benzoate as the energy source. OMVs of P. putida KT2440 showed low pathological activity toward cultured cells that originated from human lung cells, which suggests their potential as adjuvants or OMV vaccine carriers. Our results suggest that the protein composition of the OMVs of P. putida KT2440 reflects the characteristics of the total proteome of P. putida KT2440.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/pr500411dDOI Listing
October 2014

Proteomic characterization of plasmid pLA1 for biodegradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in the marine bacterium, Novosphingobium pentaromativorans US6-1.

PLoS One 2014 7;9(6):e90812. Epub 2014 Mar 7.

Division of Life Science, Korea Basic Science Institute, Daejeon, Republic of Korea; Department of Bio-Analytical Science, University of Science and Technology (UST), Daejeon, Republic of Korea.

Novosphingobium pentaromativorans US6-1 is a halophilic marine bacterium able to degrade polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Genome sequence analysis revealed that the large plasmid pLA1 present in N. pentaromativorans US6-1 consists of 199 ORFs and possess putative biodegradation genes that may be involved in PAH degradation. 1-DE/LC-MS/MS analysis of N. pentaromativorans US6-1 cultured in the presence of different PAHs and monocyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (MAHs) identified approximately 1,000 and 1,400 proteins, respectively. Up-regulated biodegradation enzymes, including those belonging to pLA1, were quantitatively compared. Among the PAHs, phenanthrene induced the strongest up-regulation of extradiol cleavage pathway enzymes such as ring-hydroxylating dioxygenase, putative biphenyl-2,3-diol 1,2-dioxygenase, and catechol 2,3-dioxygenase in pLA1. These enzymes lead the initial step of the lower catabolic pathway of aromatic hydrocarbons through the extradiol cleavage pathway and participate in the attack of PAH ring cleavage, respectively. However, N. pentaromativorans US6-1 cultured with p-hydroxybenzoate induced activation of another extradiol cleavage pathway, the protocatechuate 4,5-dioxygenase pathway, that originated from chromosomal genes. These results suggest that N. pentaromativorans US6-1 utilizes two different extradiol pathways and plasmid pLA1 might play a key role in the biodegradation of PAH in N. pentaromativorans US6-1.
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http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0090812PLOS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3946609PMC
February 2015

Proteogenomic characterization of antimicrobial resistance in extensively drug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii DU202.

J Antimicrob Chemother 2014 Jun 31;69(6):1483-91. Epub 2014 Jan 31.

Division of Life Science, Korea Basic Science Institute, Daejeon, 305-806 Daejeon, Korea Department of Bio-Analytical Science, University of Science and Technology (UST), Daejeon 305-350, Korea

Objectives: To determine the genomic sequence of extensively drug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii DU202 and to perform proteomic characterization of antibiotic resistance in this strain using genome data.

Methods: The genome sequence of A. baumannii DU202 was determined using the Hi-Seq 2000 system and comparative analysis was performed to determine the unique characteristics of A. baumannii DU202. Previous proteomic results from the cell wall membrane fraction by one-dimensional electrophoresis and liquid chromatography combined with mass spectrometry analysis (1DE-LC-MS/MS), using the A. baumannii ATCC 17978 genome as a reference, were reanalysed to elucidate the resistance mechanisms of A. baumannii DU202 using strain-specific genome data. Additional proteomic data from the cytosolic fraction were also analysed.

Results: The genome of A. baumannii DU202 consists of 3660 genes and is most closely related to the Korean A. baumannii 1656-2 strain. More than 144 resistance genes were annotated in the A. baumannii DU202 genome, of which 72 that encoded proteins associated with antibiotic resistance were identified in the proteomic analysis of A. baumannii DU202 cultured in tetracycline, imipenem and Luria-Bertani broth (control) medium. Strong induction of β-lactamases, a multidrug resistance efflux pump and resistance-nodulation-cell division (RND) multidrug efflux proteins was found to be important in the antibiotic resistance responses of A. baumannii DU202.

Conclusions: Combining genomic and proteomic methods provided comprehensive information about the unique antibiotic resistance responses of A. baumannii DU202.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/jac/dku008DOI Listing
June 2014

Characterization of Streptococcus pneumoniae N-acetylglucosamine-6-phosphate deacetylase as a novel diagnostic marker.

J Microbiol 2013 Oct 31;51(5):659-64. Epub 2013 Oct 31.

Division of Life Science, Korea Basic Science Institute (KBSI), Daejeon 305-806, Republic of Korea.

The identification of novel diagnostic markers of pathogenic bacteria is essential for improving the accuracy of diagnoses and for developing targeted vaccines. Streptococcus pneumoniae is a significant human pathogenic bacterium that causes pneumonia. N-acetylglucosamine-6-phosphate deacetylase (NagA) was identified in a protein mixture secreted by S. pneumoniae and its strong immunogenicity was confirmed in an immuno-proteomic assay against the anti-serum of the secreted protein mixture. In this study, recombinant S. pneumoniae NagA protein was expressed and purified to analyze its protein characteristics, immunospecificity, and immunogenicity, thereby facilitating its evaluation as a novel diagnostic marker for S. pneumoniae. Mass spectrometry analysis showed that S. pneumoniae NagA contains four internal disulfide bonds and that it does not undergo post-translational modification. S. pneumoniae NagA antibodies successfully detected NagA from different S. pneumoniae strains, whereas NagA from other pathogenic bacteria species was not detected. In addition, mice infected with S. pneumoniae generated NagA antibodies in an effective manner. These results suggest that NagA has potential as a novel diagnostic marker for S. pneumoniae because of its high immunogenicity and immunospecificity.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12275-013-3451-8DOI Listing
October 2013

Characterization of thermostable deblocking aminopeptidases of archaeon Thermococcus onnurineus NA1 by proteomic and biochemical approaches.

J Microbiol 2012 Oct 4;50(5):792-7. Epub 2012 Nov 4.

Division of Life Science, Korea Basic Science Institute, Daejeon 305-333, Republic of Korea.

Thermococcus onnurineus NA1 is a hyperthermophilic archaeon that grows optimally at >80°C. The deblocking aminopeptidase (DAP) (TNA1-DAP1) encoded in Ton_1032 of T. onnurineus NA1 is considered a major DAP. However, four genes encoding putative DAP have been identified from a genomic analysis of T. onnurineus NA1. A proteomic analysis revealed that all four DAPs were differentially induced in YPS culture medium and, particularly, two DAPs (TNA1-DAP1 and TNA1-DAP2) were dominantly expressed in T. onnurineus NA1. The biochemical properties and enzyme activity of DAPs induced in an E. coli expression system suggested that the two major DAPs play complementary roles in T. onnurineus NA1.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12275-012-2461-2DOI Listing
October 2012

Analysis of Streptococcus pneumoniae secreted antigens by immuno-proteomic approach.

Diagn Microbiol Infect Dis 2012 Apr 4;72(4):318-27. Epub 2012 Feb 4.

Division of Life Science, Korea Basic Science Institute, Daejeon 305-806, South Korea.

Streptococcus pneumoniae is an important human pathogen that causes a variety of diseases in both adults and children, such as pneumonia, bacteremia, meningitis, otitis media, and sinusitis. Despite their clinical importance, to date, there have been few proteomic studies of these strains for screening of virulence factors or diagnostic markers. In the present study, secreted proteins (secretome) of Streptococcus pneumoniae strains were enriched using ammonium sulfate precipitation and identified by the shotgun proteomic method using 1-dimensional electrophoresis liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry analysis. Characterization of the identified proteins revealed that 17.8% (42) of the secreted proteins possessed signal peptides. Twenty-one secreted proteins belonged to the extracellular group, and 4 secreted proteins belonged to the cell wall group. Well-known virulence factors (PrtA, PspC, PsaA, PbpA, PhtD, AmiA, ZmpB, Eno, and Ply) were included in the secreted protein fraction. Western blotting using antiserum against secreted protein mixtures showed that Gsp-781, Sphtra, NagA, PhtD, ZmpB, and Eno were strongly immunogenic. Our data suggest that the immuno-proteomic approach is a useful method for high-throughput identification of secreted proteins and screening of candidate vaccine antigens or diagnostic markers. Gsp-781 is introduced as a novel secreted antigen of Streptococcus pneumoniae.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.diagmicrobio.2011.12.013DOI Listing
April 2012

Photosensitizing hollow nanocapsules for combination cancer therapy.

Angew Chem Int Ed Engl 2011 Dec 17;50(50):11968-71. Epub 2011 Oct 17.

Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Yonsei University, 50 Yonsei-ro, Seodaemoon-Gu, Seoul 120-749, Korea.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/anie.201102658DOI Listing
December 2011

Enrichment and proteome analysis of a hyperthermostable protein set of archaeon Thermococcus onnurineus NA1.

Extremophiles 2011 Jul 23;15(4):451-61. Epub 2011 Apr 23.

Division of Life Science, Korea Basic Science Institute, Daejeon, Korea.

Thermococcus onnurineus NA1 is a hyperthermophilic archaeon that can be used for the screening of thermophilic enzymes. Previously, we characterized the metabolic enzymes of the cytosolic proteome by two-dimensional electrophoresis/tandem mass spectrometry (2-DE/MS-MS). In this study, we identified a subset of hyperthermostable proteins in the cytosolic proteome using enrichment by in vitro heat treatment and protein identification. After heat treatment at 100°C for 2 h, 13 and 149 proteins were identified from the soluble proteome subset by 2-DE/MS-MS and 1-DE/MS-MS analysis, respectively. Representative proteins included intracellular protease I, thioredoxin reductase, triosephosphate isomerase, putative hydroperoxide reductase, proteasome, and translation initiation factors. Intracellular protease, deblocking aminopeptidases, and fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase were overexpressed in Escherichia coli and biological activity above 85°C was confirmed. The folding transition temperature (Tm) of identified proteins was analyzed using the in silico prediction program TargetStar. The proteins enriched with the heat treatment have higher Tm than the homologous proteins from mesophilic strains. These results suggested that the heat-stable protein set of hyperthermophilic T. onnurineus NA1 can be effectively fractionated and enriched by in vitro heat treatment.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00792-011-0376-1DOI Listing
July 2011

Characterization of hyperthermostable fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase from Thermococcus onnurineus NA1.

J Microbiol 2010 Dec 9;48(6):803-7. Epub 2011 Jan 9.

Division of Life Science, Korea Basic Science Institute, Daejeon, 305-806, Republic of Korea.

To understand the physiological functions of thermostable fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase (TNA1-Fbp) from Thermococcus onnurineus NA1, its recombinant enzyme was overexpressed in Escherichia coli, purified, and the enzymatic properties were characterized. The enzyme showed maximal activity for fructose-1,6-bisphosphate at 95°C and pH 8.0 with a half-life (t (1/2)) of about 8 h. TNA1-Fbp had broad substrate specificities for fructose-1,6-bisphosphate and its analogues including fructose-1-phosphate, glucose-1-phosphate, and phosphoenolpyruvate. In addition, its enzyme activity was increased five-fold by addition of 1 mM Mg(2+), while Li(+) did not enhance enzymatic activity. TNA1-Fbp activity was inhibited by ATP, ADP, and phosphoenolpyruvate, but AMP up to 100 mM did not have any effect. TNA1-Fbp is currently defined as a class V fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase (FBPase) because it is very similar to FBPase of Thermococcus kodakaraensis KOD1 based on sequence homology. However, this enzyme shows a different range of substrate specificities. These results suggest that TNA1-Fbp can establish new criterion for class V FBPases.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12275-010-0377-2DOI Listing
December 2010

Micropatterning of a nanoporous alumina membrane with poly(ethylene glycol) hydrogel to create cellular micropatterns on nanotopographic substrates.

Acta Biomater 2011 Mar 5;7(3):1281-9. Epub 2010 Nov 5.

Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Yonsei University, 134 Sinchon-Dong, Seodaemoon-Gu, Seoul 120-749, Republic of Korea.

In this paper, we describe a simple method for fabricating micropatterned nanoporous substrates that are capable of controlling the spatial positioning of mammalian cells. Micropatterned substrates were prepared by fabricating poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) hydrogel microstructures on alumina membranes with 200 nm nanopores using photolithography. Because hydrogel precursor solution could infiltrate and become crosslinked within the nanopores, the resultant hydrogel micropatterns were firmly anchored on the substrate without the use of adhesion-promoting monolayers, thereby allow tailoring of the surface properties of unpatterned nanoporous areas. For mammalian cell patterning, arrays of microwells of different dimensions were fabricated. These microwells were composed of hydrophilic PEG hydrogel walls surrounding nanoporous bottoms that were modified with cell-adhesive Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) peptides. Because the PEG hydrogel was non-adhesive towards proteins and cells, cells adhered selectively and remained viable within the RGD-modified nanoporous regions, thereby creating cellular micropatterns. Although the morphology of cell clusters and the number of cells inside one microwell were dependent on the lateral dimension of the microwells, adhered cells that were in direct contact with nanopores were able to penetrate into the nanopores by small extensions (filopodia) for all the different sizes of microwells evaluated.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.actbio.2010.11.006DOI Listing
March 2011

Molecular cloning of cyanobacterial pteridine glycosyltransferases that catalyze the transfer of either glucose or xylose to tetrahydrobiopterin.

Appl Environ Microbiol 2010 Nov 17;76(22):7658-61. Epub 2010 Sep 17.

School of Biological Sciences, Inje University, Kimhae 621-749, South Korea.

Here, we report cloning of cyanobacterial genes encoding pteridine glycosyltransferases that catalyze glucosyl or xylosyl transfer from UDP-sugars to tetrahydrobiopterin. The genes were cloned by PCR amplification from genomic DNA which was isolated from culture and environmental samples and overexpressed in Escherichia coli for an in vitro activity assay.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/AEM.01083-10DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2976191PMC
November 2010

Micropatterned assembly of silica nanoparticles for a protein microarray with enhanced detection sensitivity.

Biomed Microdevices 2010 Jun;12(3):457-64

Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Yonsei University, 134 Sinchon-Dong, Seodaemoon-Gu, Seoul, 120-749, Republic of Korea.

We used an assembly of silica nanoparticles (SNPs) as a three-dimensional template for protein immobilization to prepare a protein microarray with enhanced protein loading capacity and detection sensitivity. SNPs were first modified with 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTES) for covalent immobilization of protein and micropatterned on poly(ethylene glycol)(PEG)-coated glass slides using elastomeric membranes with an array of holes. Proteins were selectively immobilized only on the SNP region, while the PEG regions served as an effective barrier to protein adsorption. Because of multi-layered SNPs that had curved surface, protein loading in the SNP micropattern was about six times greater than on a planar surface, as observed by fluorescence microscopy, which consequently improved the protein activity and reaction rate. GOX-catalyzed glucose oxidation and the molecular recognition mediated, specific binding between biotin and streptavidin were both successfully assayed using SNP microarrays, with better fluorescence signal and sensitivity than corresponding planar microarrays.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10544-010-9402-9DOI Listing
June 2010

An enzymatic method to distinguish tetrahydrobiopterin from oxidized biopterins using UDP-glucose:tetrahydrobiopterin glucosyltransferase.

Anal Biochem 2010 Feb 9;397(1):79-83. Epub 2009 Oct 9.

Frontier Inje Research for Science and Technology Research Group, School of Biological Sciences, Inje University, Kimhae 621-749, Republic of Korea.

The quantitative determination of tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4) and its oxidized forms (dihydrobiopterin and biopterin) is important in searching for possible markers of neuropsychiatric and cardiovascular disorders as well as in diagnosing BH4 deficiencies. Currently, two high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) methods are available, although both have some limitations. We developed an enzymatic method to distinguish BH4 from the oxidized forms by employing BH4:UDP-glucose alpha-glucosyltransferase (BGluT), which catalyzes glucosyl transfer from UDP-glucose to BH4. The recombinant BGluT isolated from Escherichia coli converted essentially all of the BH4 in a mixture containing oxidized biopterins to the glucoside while leaving the oxidized forms intact. Therefore, acidic iodine oxidation of the reaction mixture followed by single fluorescence HPLC permitted the determination of biopterin and biopterin-glucoside, which represent oxidized biopterins and BH4, respectively. The validity of the method was evaluated using authentic biopterins and animal samples such as human urine, rat plasma, and rat liver. The BGluT-catalyzed reaction not only would reduce the burden of chromatographic separation but also would promise non-HPLC analysis of BH4.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ab.2009.10.007DOI Listing
February 2010

Osteosarcoma of the ethmoid sinus.

Skeletal Radiol 2004 May 18;33(5):291-4. Epub 2004 Feb 18.

Department of Pathology, College of Medicine, Hallym University, Anyang, Korea.

A rare case of chondroblastic osteosarcoma arising from the ethmoid sinus is reported. The patient, a 34-year-old woman, presented with diminished visual acuity of the left eye. CT and MR imaging showed a heterogeneous left-sided nasoethmoidal mass destroying the medial orbital wall. Biopsy revealed a chondroblastic osteosarcoma containing malignant chondroid elements and calcified malignant osteoid. Treatment consisted of craniofacial resection followed by radiotherapy and chemotherapy with symptomatic improvement. We briefly discuss ethmoidal osteosarcomas.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00256-003-0742-xDOI Listing
May 2004

A single current density component imaging by MRCDI without subject rotations.

Magn Reson Imaging 2003 Nov;21(9):1023-8

Graduate School of East-West Medical Science, Kyung Hee University, Kyungki, Korea.

Magnetic resonance current density imaging (MRCDI) is a useful method for measuring electrical current density distribution inside a subject. Due to the requirement of subject rotations in MRCDI, MRCDI has not been widely applied to in vivo studies. In this paper, we propose a new current density image (CDI) reconstruction method by which a single component of the current density can be imaged by MRCDI without subject rotations. After measuring one of the two magnetic field components, produced by the current density component passing through the measurement plane, we have reconstructed the current density component images in the spatial frequency domain. Even though the proposed method has a limitation that the area of magnetic field measurement should be much larger than that of the current density, the proposed method is expected to expedite MRCDI applications to in vivo studies.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/s0730-725x(03)00213-3DOI Listing
November 2003