Publications by authors named "Yavuz Ince"

4 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Window to His World: Using a Patient's YouTube Channel to Help Diagnose Chronic Mania.

J Psychiatr Pract 2020 07;26(4):324-328

INCE, STREETER: Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Neurosciences, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI MAKSIMOWSKI: Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Neurosciences, Wayne State University, and John D. Dingell VA Medical Center, Detroit, MI.

Although chronic mania has been investigated, with several case reports and systematic retrospective cohort studies in the literature, it not a widely recognized entity. No specific definition for chronic mania is provided in the fifth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5). Furthermore, it is challenging to identify patients with chronic mania unless they come to the attention of the legal or medical system. We present the case of a manic patient who was hospitalized and subsequently found to have a YouTube channel that he had been using to promote his self-invented religion for over 2 years. Consent was obtained from the patient to review this YouTube channel for collateral information. From these videos, the patient was seen to be chronically circumstantial in his thought processes, grandiose in his ideas, highly energetic, distractible, preoccupied with religion, and talking with elaborate and rapid speech. A significant improvement in his symptoms was observed after administration of oral risperidone, with his scores on the Young Mania Rating Scale and Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale also showing improvement. To our knowledge, this is the first case in the literature in which an online video-sharing service was used longitudinally to facilitate diagnosis of a mental illness. We suggest that technology has great potential to improve our diagnostic tools, especially for disorders such as chronic mania the diagnosis of which relies primarily on self-report and collateral information.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/PRA.0000000000000479DOI Listing
July 2020

A low cost training phantom model for radio-guided localization techniques in occult breast lesions.

J Surg Oncol 2015 Sep 6;112(4):449-51. Epub 2015 Aug 6.

Women's Cancer Center, Dana-Farber/Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts.

Radio-guided localization (RGL) for identifying occult breast lesions has been widely accepted as an alternative technique to other localization methods, including those using wire guidance. An appropriate phantom model would be an invaluable tool for practitioners interested in learning the technique of RGL prior to clinical application. The aim of this study was to devise an inexpensive and reproducible training phantom model for RGL. We developed a simple RGL phantom model imitating an occult breast lesion from inexpensive supplies including a pimento olive, a green pea and a turkey breast. The phantom was constructed for a total cost of less than $20 and prepared in approximately 10 min. After the first model's construction, we constructed approximately 25 additional models and demonstrated that the model design was easily reproducible. The RGL phantom is a time- and cost-effective model that accurately simulates the RGL technique for non-palpable breast lesions. Future studies are warranted to further validate this model as an effective teaching tool.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jso.23984DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4583351PMC
September 2015

Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever infections reported by ProMED.

Int J Infect Dis 2014 Sep 16;26:44-6. Epub 2014 Jun 16.

Infectious Diseases Department, School of Medicine, Koc University, Istanbul, Turkey. Electronic address:

Objective: There are limited sources describing the global burden of emerging diseases. We reviewed the Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus (CCHFV) infections reported by ProMED and assessed the reliability of the data retrieved compared to published reports. We evaluated the effectiveness of ProMED as a source of epidemiological data by focusing on CCHFV infections.

Methods: Using the keywords "Crimean Congo hemorrhagic fever" and "Crimean Congo" in the ProMED search engine, we reviewed all the information about the news and harvested data using a structured form, including year, country, gender, occupation, the number of infected individuals, and the number of fatal cases.

Results: We identified 383 entries reported between January 1998 and October 2013. A total 3426 infected cases were reported, with 451 fatal cases, giving an overall case fatality rate (CFR) of 13%. Out of 144 cases for which the gender was reported, 97 (67%) were male. Most of the cases were reported from Turkey, followed by Russia, Iran, Pakistan, and Afghanistan.

Conclusions: Case reporting systems such as ProMED are useful to gather information and synthesize knowledge on the emerging infections. Although certain areas need to be improved, ProMED provided good information about Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ijid.2014.04.005DOI Listing
September 2014

To grow or not to grow, That is the question.

Surg Neurol Int 2013 31;4(Suppl 1):S407-10. Epub 2013 Oct 31.

Department of Neurological Surgery, University of California, San Francisco, CA, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.4103/2152-7806.120882DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3868976PMC
December 2013