Publications by authors named "Yassine Zouheir"

4 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Emergence and spread of resistant N. meningitidis implicated in invasive meningococcal diseases during the past decade (2008-2017).

J Antibiot (Tokyo) 2019 03 27;72(3):185-188. Epub 2018 Nov 27.

Laboratory of Bacteriology and Parasitology, Institut Pasteur du Maroc, Casablanca, Morocco.

Neisseria meningitidis is one of the most crucial causes of bacterial meningitis worldwide. The incidence of meningitis due to N. meningitidis greatly changes from one geographical area to the other: 500,000-1,200,000 invasive meningococcal diseases occur each year, with 50,000-135,000 deaths. Once the diagnosis of bacterial meningitis is made, parenteral antibiotic treatment is started as soon as possible. A preventive treatment can also be proposed for those subjects at risk of exposure. Globally, resistance to antibiotics used in the treatment of prophylaxis of meningococcal disease is relatively rare. Penicillin is becoming less useful in the treatment of invasive meningococcal diseases because meningococcal isolates are increasingly less susceptible to this antibiotic. Meningococcal strains less susceptible to ceftriaxone or ciprofloxacin are rare. In addition, resistance to rifampicin is not a current concern as resistant isolates are rarely reported. In conclusion, the emergence of new meningococcal strains with decreasing susceptibility during the last decade should not be ignored, as this could be a worrying phenomenon in the future and justifies a judicious epidemiological survey on a continuous basis.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41429-018-0125-0DOI Listing
March 2019

Human Papillomavirus Genotyping and p16(INK4a) Expression in Cervical Lesions: A Combined Test to Avoid Cervical Cancer Progression.

J Cancer Prev 2016 Jun 30;21(2):121-5. Epub 2016 Jun 30.

Laboratory of Histo-Cytopathology of Institut Pasteur du Maroc, Hassan II University Casablanca, Casablanca, Morocco.

Cervical cancer is a major public health problem in Morocco. The cervical cancer has a long precancerous period that provides an opportunity for the screening and treatment. Improving screening tests is a priority goal for the early diagnosis of cervical cancer. This study was conducted to evaluate the combination of p16(INK4a) protein expression, human papillomavirus (HPV) typing, and histopathology for the identification of cervical lesions with high risk to progress to cervical cancer among Moroccan women. A total of 96 cervical biopsies were included in this study. Signal amplification in situ hybridization with biotinylated probes was used to detect HPV. Immunohistochemistry was used to evaluate the expression of p16(INK4a) protein. HPV DNA was detected in 74.0% of the biopsies (71/96). Of the seventy-one positive HPV cases, we detected 67.6% (48/71) of high risk (HR)-HPV (HPV 16 and 18), 24% of low risk-HPV (HPV 6 and 11), 1.4% intermediate risk-HPV (HPV 31, 33, and 35), and 7% coinfections (HPV 6/11 and 16/18). Overexpression of p16(INK4a) protein was observed in 72.9% (70/96) of the biopsies. In addition, p16(INK4a) protein detection was closely correlated with recovery of HR HPV. Our result showed that p16(INK4a) expression level is correlated with HR-HPV status.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.15430/JCP.2016.21.2.121DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4933437PMC
June 2016

Knowledge of Human Papillomavirus and Acceptability to Vaccinate in Adolescents and Young Adults of the Moroccan Population.

J Pediatr Adolesc Gynecol 2016 Jun 21;29(3):292-8. Epub 2015 Nov 21.

Laboratory of Neurosciences, Integrated Diseases and Natural Substances, Faculty of Sciences and Technics, Hassan II University, Mohammedia, Morocco.

Study Objective: Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is estimated to play an etiologic role in 99.7% of cervical cancer. Vaccines can prevent up to 70% of the cervical cancer caused by HPV 16 and 18. The present study was designed to define the knowledge of HPV and HPV vaccine acceptability among Moroccan youth. DESIGN, SETTING, PARTICIPANTS, INTERVENTIONS, AND MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: A nationwide anonymous questionnaire with a sample of 688 adolescents (12-17 years) and 356 young adults (18-30 years) was organized, that asked about HPV, origin of cervical cancer, Papanicolaou (Pap) test, and acceptability of HPV vaccine. Data were analyzed using univariate and multivariate logistic regression methods.

Results: Overall, a low frequency (213/1044 = 20%) of HPV knowledge was observed among the studied population. A multivariate model analysis showed that age, educational level, and knowledge of the Pap test remained significantly associated factors with HPV knowledge. Additionally, only 27% (282/1044) of participants were willing to accept HPV vaccination. Highest acceptability was observed among young adults compared with adolescents (166/356 = 46.6% vs 116/688 = 16.9%). Sixty-two percent (103/165) of male participants accepted the HPV vaccine compared with only 20.4% (179/879) of female participants. Educational level, type of school, and knowledge of the Pap test were associated factors with HPV vaccine acceptability in a multivariate model analysis.

Conclusion: The present study showed a low level of HPV knowledge and HPV vaccine acceptability among Moroccan youth. Promotion of activities and sensitization are required to maximize public awareness in the future. This objective can be achieved with the use of media, active efforts by health care providers, and introduction of sexual education in school programs.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jpag.2015.11.002DOI Listing
June 2016

Infectious diseases in North Africa and North African immigrants to Europe.

Eur J Public Health 2014 Aug;24 Suppl 1:47-56

2 Department of Molecular Genetic Epidemiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany.

The epidemiological transition has reduced infectious diseases mortality in most European countries, yet increased migrant influx risks importing diseases. All reported prevalence rates must be considered on a case-by-case basis depending on the disease in question, respective European Union (EU) country and migratory patterns at work. Tuberculosis has seen a re-emergence in Europe and is concentrated among migrants. Migrants arriving from North Africa (NA) and sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) carry higher rates of hepatitis C and B than the local EU population. The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) impact of NA migrants to Europe is very low but a hallmark of the HIV epidemic is the penetration and circulation of non-B strains, recombinant forms and HIV-drug-resistant profiles through SSA migrants using NA as a transit point into Europe. Leishmaniasis is a re-emerging zoonotic disease prevalent to Southern Europe although not specifically isolated in migrant groups. Although not endemic in NA countries, malaria represent S: a risk in terms of re-emergence in Europe through transitory migrants arriving from SSA with the destination to Europe. Schistosomiasis has been largely eliminated from NA. High migrant flux into European countries has resulted in changing patterns of communicable disease and collectively requires a continuous surveillance. World Health Organization guidelines recommend targeted screening and preventative vaccination, followed by integration of migrants into the local health-care systems allowing for long-term treatment and follow-up. Finally, effective public health campaigns as a form of prevention are essential for the mitigation of disease dissemination in the migrant pool and for second-generation children of migrants.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/eurpub/cku109DOI Listing
August 2014
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