Publications by authors named "Yasemin Cekic"

3 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Nurses' Experiences, Fear of COVID-19, and Death Anxiety During the COVID-19 Pandemic: A Cross-Sectional Study From Turkey.

J Psychosoc Nurs Ment Health Serv 2022 Jul 12:1-10. Epub 2022 Jul 12.

According to the literature, fear affects death anxiety, and there is a strong relationship between death anxiety and psychopathology. Using a cross-sectional design, the current study investigated the experiences of nurses ( = 250) working in health institutions in Turkey during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic and the correlation between fear and death anxiety. It was determined that nurses were exposed to many negative psychosocial changes during the pandemic. A moderate positive correlation was found between fear of COVID-19 and death anxiety scores. Initiatives to help control nurses' fear and death anxiety, a reasonable shift schedule, and provision of psychological counseling services are recommended. [(x), xx-xx.].
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3928/02793695-20220621-01DOI Listing
July 2022

"I Am Grateful for Every Day I Live": A Qualitative Study on the Spiritual Experiences of Women With Gynecological Cancer.

Cancer Nurs 2022 May 31. Epub 2022 May 31.

Author Affiliations: Department of Obstetrics and Gynecologic Nursing, Faculty of Nursing, Hacettepe University (Dr Uslu-Sahan); Faculty of Nursing, Departments of Midwifery (Dr Er-Korucu) and Psychiatric Nursing (Dr Cekic), Ankara University; and Hacettepe University Faculty of Medicine Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Gynecologic Oncology Clinic (Mrs Simsek), Ankara, Turkey.

Background: Considering the life-threatening nature of gynecological cancers, spirituality and religious beliefs may play a key role in the experiences of the patients during the disease process and their coping.

Objective: The aim of this study was to understand the spiritual experiences of Muslim women with gynecological cancer during the disease process.

Methods: A qualitative, phenomenological, and hermeneutic approach was followed in the research. Fourteen women with gynecological cancer in Turkey were interviewed individually. The thematic analysis approach of Braun and Clarke was used to evaluate the data.

Results: The results of the data analysis revealed 3 themes (consisting of 9 subthemes): (1) reaction to cancer: spiritual distress (fear of death, perception of punishment, fear of obscurity and uncertainty, and being a cause of spiritual distress in the family); (2) reaction to cancer: spiritual well-being (accepting whatever may come from Allah, strengthening the faith in Allah); and (3) spiritual resources for coping with cancer (religious practices, hobbies and complementary practices, and family support).

Conclusions: The results of the study shed light on the cases that may cause spiritual distress and improve the spiritual well-being that is experienced by Muslim women with gynecological cancer during the disease process; they also reveal that religion has an effect on the experiences during the cancer process and the coping methods.

Implications For Practice: Healthcare professionals who care for Muslim women with gynecological cancer should plan spiritual care by being aware of the cultural characteristics and religious beliefs of these women and their families.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NCC.0000000000001137DOI Listing
May 2022

Effects of interpersonal relational role analysis on nursing students' depressive symptoms and coping styles.

Perspect Psychiatr Care 2021 Oct 27. Epub 2021 Oct 27.

Department of Nursing, Ankara University Faculty of Nursing, Ankara, Turkey.

Purpose: This study aims to investigate the effects of interpersonal relational role analysis (IRRA) on nursing students' depressive symptoms and coping styles.

Design And Methods: This study was conducted with randomized controlled, pretest-posttest control group design, and follow-up test patterns (n = 10).

Findings: As a result, IRRA had a positive effect on nursing students' depressive symptoms and coping styles.

Practice Implications: Psychiatric nurses and other mental health professionals can readily use IRRA to help reduce depressive symptoms in groups with mild to moderate depressive symptoms and to develop effective styles to cope with stress.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/ppc.12966DOI Listing
October 2021
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