Publications by authors named "Yanli Tong"

14 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Highly Sensitive Fluorescence Detection of Global 5-Hydroxymethylcytosine from Nanogram Input with Strongly Emitting Copper Nanotags.

Anal Chem 2021 Oct 12. Epub 2021 Oct 12.

School of Chemistry, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou 510275, China.

Quantitative analysis of 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC) has remarkable clinical significance to early cancer diagnosis; however, it is limited by the requirement in current assays for large amounts of starting material and expensive instruments requring expertise. Herein, we present a highly sensitive fluorescence method, termed hmC-TACN, for global 5hmC quantification from several nanogram inputs based on terminal deoxynucleotide transferase (TdT)-assisted formation of fluorescent copper (Cu) nanotags. In this method, 5hmC is labeled with click tags by T4 phage β-glucosyltransferase (β-GT) and cross-linked with a random DNA primer via click chemistry. TdT initiates the template-free extension along the primer at the modified 5hmC site and then generates a long polythymine (T) tail, which can template the production of strongly emitting Cu nanoparticles (CuNPs). Consequently, an intensely fluorescent tag containing numerous CuNPs can be labeled onto the 5hmC site, providing the sensitive quantification of 5hmC with a limit of detection (LOD) as low as 0.021% of total nucleotides (/ = 3). With only a 5 ng input (∼1000 cells) of genomic DNA, global 5hmC levels were accurately determined in mouse tissues, human cell lines (including normal and cancer cells of breast, lung, and liver), and urines of a bladder cancer patient and healthy control. Moreover, as few as 100 cells can also be distinguished between normal and cancer cells. The hmC-TACN method has great promise of being cost effective and easily mastered, with low-input clinical utility, and even for the microzone analysis of tumor models.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/acs.analchem.1c03266DOI Listing
October 2021

DNA functionalized double quantum dots-based fluorescence biosensor for one-step simultaneous detection of multiple microRNAs.

Talanta 2021 Dec 30;235:122763. Epub 2021 Jul 30.

School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, 510006, China. Electronic address:

The disease diagnosis by detecting single microRNAs (miRNAs) can produce high false positive rate. Herein, a novel fluorescence biosensor method for one-step simultaneous detection of multiple miRNAs was proposed by using single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) functionalized double quantum dots (QDs) and black hole quencher (BHQ)-decorated magnetic nanobeads (MNs). MNs were linked with two black hole quenchers (BHQ1 and BHQ3) via a complementary DNA (cDNA). The ssDNA/cDNA hybridization contributed to the fluorescence quenching of double QDs due to the fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) between double QDs and BHQ. In the presence of target miRNA-33 (miR-33) and miRNA-125b (miR-125b), the ssDNA and ssDNA were respectively hybridized with miR-33 and miR-125b to form more stable duplexes. Thus, the double QDs were released into supernatant after the magnetic separation, leading to the fluorescence signals recovery at 537 nm and 647 nm. A wide linear range (0.5 nM-320 nM for miR-33 and 0.1 nM-250 nM for miR-125b) and low limits of detection (0.09 nM for miR-33 and 0.02 nM for miR-125b) were achieved. Moreover, our approach has been demonstrated to simultaneously detect miR-33 and miR-125b in cell extracts. With advantages of high sensitivity, strong specificity, low background and low cost, the strategies show great potentials for the detection of various targets in bioanalysis and disease diagnosis.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.talanta.2021.122763DOI Listing
December 2021

Resistant starch intake alleviates collagen-induced arthritis in mice by modulating gut microbiota and promoting concomitant propionate production.

J Autoimmun 2021 01 14;116:102564. Epub 2020 Nov 14.

Department of Rheumatology and Immunology, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan, China. Electronic address:

Gut dysbiosis precedes clinic symptoms in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and has been implicated in the initiation and persistence of RA. The early treatment of RA is critical to better clinical outcome especially for joint destruction. Although dietary interventions have been reported to be beneficial for RA patients, it is unclear to whether diet-induced gut microbiome changes can be a preventive strategy to RA development. Here, we investigated the effect of a high fiber diet (HFD) rich with resistant starch (RS) on collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) and gut microbial composition in mice. RS-HFD significantly reduced arthritis severity and bone erosion in CIA mice. The therapeutic effects of RS-HFD were correlated with splenic regulatory T cell (Treg) expansion and serum interleukin-10 (IL-10) increase. The increased abundance of Lactobacillus and Lachnoclostridium genera concomitant with CIA were eliminated in CIA mice fed the RS-HFD diet. Notably, RS-HFD also led to a predominance of Bacteroidetes, and increased abundances of Lachnospiraceae_NK4A136_group and Bacteroidales_S24-7_group genera in CIA mice. Accompanied with the gut microbiome changes, serum levels of the short-chain fatty acid (SCFA) acetate, propionate and isobutyrate detected by GC-TOFMS were also increased in CIA mice fed RS-HFD. While, addition of β-acids from hops extract to the drinking water of mice fed RS-HFD significantly decreased serum propionate and completely eliminated RS-HFD-induced disease improvement, Treg cell increase and IL-10 production in CIA mice. Moreover, exogenous propionate added to drinking water replicated the protective role of RS-HFD in CIA including reduced bone damage. The direct effect of propionate on T cells in vitro was further explored as at least one mechanistic explanation for the dietary effects of microbial metabolites on immune regulation in experimental RA. Taken together, RS-HFD significantly reduced CIA and bone damage and altered gut microbial composition with concomitant increase in circulating propionate, indicating that RS-rich diet might be a promising therapy especially in the early stage of RA.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jaut.2020.102564DOI Listing
January 2021

Fluorescence resonance energy transfer-based DNA framework assembled split G-quadruplex nanodevices for microRNA sensing.

Chem Commun (Camb) 2020 Nov 14;56(88):13583-13586. Epub 2020 Oct 14.

School of Pharmacy, Nantong University, Nantong, Jiangsu 226001, China.

A DNA framework assembled split G4 nanodevice was fabricated to realize microRNA imaging in living HeLa cells. After hybridization with the target, the separated G4 segments underwent structural transformations, which could initiate fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) processes. Our design may pave a novel way to facilitate applications of the G4 motif.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1039/d0cc06054bDOI Listing
November 2020

Microbiota and metabolites in rheumatic diseases.

Autoimmun Rev 2020 Aug 30;19(8):102530. Epub 2020 Mar 30.

Department of Rheumatology and Immunology, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan, China. Electronic address:

As a gigantic community in the human body, the microbiota exerts pleiotropic roles in human health and disease ranging from digestion and absorption of nutrients from food, defense against infection of pathogens, to regulation of immune system development and immune homeostasis. Recent advances in "omics" studies and bioinformatics analyses have broadened our insights of the microbiota composition of the inner and other surfaces of the body and their interactions with the host. Apart from the direct contact of microbes at the mucosal barrier, metabolites produced or metabolized by the gut microbes can serve as important immune regulators or initiators in a wide variety of diseases, including gastrointestinal diseases, metabolic disorders and systemic rheumatic diseases. This review focuses on the most recent understanding of how the microbiota and metabolites shape rheumatic diseases. Studies that explore the mechanistic interplay between microbes, metabolites and the host could thereby provide clues for novel methods in the diagnosis, therapy, and prevention of rheumatic diseases.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.autrev.2020.102530DOI Listing
August 2020

Oral Microbiota Perturbations Are Linked to High Risk for Rheumatoid Arthritis.

Front Cell Infect Microbiol 2019 22;9:475. Epub 2020 Jan 22.

Department of Rheumatology and Immunology, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu, China.

Oral microbial dysbiosis is known to increase susceptibility of an individual to develop rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Individuals at-risk of RA may undergo different phases of disease progression. In this study, we aim to investigate whether and whereby the oral microbiome communities alter prior to symptoms of RA. Seventy-nine saliva samples were collected from 29 high-risk individuals, who were positive for anti-citrullinated protein antibodies (ACPA) and have no clinical arthritis, 27 RA patients and 23 healthy controls (HCs). The salivary microbiome was examined using 16S ribosomal RNA gene sequencing. Alpha and beta diversity analysis and the linear discriminant analysis were applied to examine the bacterial diversity, community structure and discriminatory taxa between three groups, respectively. The correlation between salivary bacteria and autoantibodies were analyzed. In the "pre-clinical" stages, salivary microbial diversity was significantly reduced comparing to RA patients and HCs. In contrast to HCs, like RA patients, individuals at high-risk for RA showed a reduction in the abundance of genus and the species , but an expansion of _6. Unexpectedly, the relative abundance of , reported as opportunistic pathogens for RA development, was significantly decreased in high-risk individuals. Additionally, we identified four genera in the saliva from high-risk individuals positively correlated with serum ACPA titers, and the other two genera inversely displayed. In summary, we observed a characteristic compositional change of salivary microbes in individuals at high-risk for RA, suggesting that oral microbiota dysbiosis occurs in the "pre-clinical" stage of RA and are correlated with systemic autoimmune features.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fcimb.2019.00475DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6987375PMC
August 2020

Ultrasensitive biosensor for microRNA-155 using synergistically catalytic nanoprobe coupled with improved cascade strand displacement reaction.

Biosens Bioelectron 2019 Dec 30;146:111744. Epub 2019 Sep 30.

School of Pharmaceutical Science, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, 510006, China. Electronic address:

MicroRNAs, essential for gene expression and physiological regulation, are considered to be reliable biomarkers for the early diagnosis and treatment of cancers. Herein, a sensitive biosensor that uses a synergistically catalytic nanoprobe and improved toehold strand displacement reaction (TSDR) has been fabricated, and successfully applied to microRNA-155 (miR-155) detection. A nanoscale copper-based metal organic framework assembled by Pt nanoparticles and horseradish peroxidase ([email protected]/HRP) served as a co-catalytic nanoprobe and was coupled with improved TSDR to achieve multiple amplifications. In the absence of miR-155, the tetrahedral DNA nanostructures (TDNs) immobilized on the gold electrode were independent of the TSDR system because of the binding of the shielding region of the locked probe (LP) with the template probe (TP). Instead, the target would initiate the TSDR system, leading to the conformational change of TDNs and hybridization of the nanoprobe. [email protected]/HRP exhibited extraordinary catalytic property towards the hydroquinone-hydrogen peroxide system, demonstrating that the nanoprobe exerted a concerted effect on the electrochemical performance of the biosensor. Under optimal conditions, the cathodic current exhibited a logarithmic relation over 0.50-1.0 × 10fM miR-155, with a detection limit of 0.13 fM, indicating that the constructed biosensor has considerable potential in the field of clinical disease diagnostics for miR-155.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bios.2019.111744DOI Listing
December 2019

A sensitive photochemical reaction-capacitively coupled contactless conductivity detection system for HPLC and its application in determination of Cyclosporin A.

Talanta 2020 Jan 8;206:120242. Epub 2019 Aug 8.

School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou, 510006, Guangdong, China. Electronic address:

High performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) post-column photochemical reaction (PR) coupled capacitively coupled contactless conductivity detector (CD) was used for the first time in analysis of weak ultraviolet (UV)-absorbing, non-fluorescence and nonpolar compound. A series of conditions including the radiation power of light source, the length of the reaction tube and the thickness of detection tube were investigated. HPLC-PR-CD system was successfully applied to the determination of Cyclosporin A (CsA). Consequently, under optimal conditions, the detection system exhibited a detection limit of 0.04 μg/mL and wide linear range from 0.5 μg/mL to 100 μg/mL for CsA detection. Application of the HPLC-PR- CD system to pharmaceutical formulation and biological samples revealed the system developed maybe reliably applied to clinical studies.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.talanta.2019.120242DOI Listing
January 2020

DNA nanotetrahedron linked dual-aptamer based voltammetric aptasensor for cardiac troponin I using a magnetic metal-organic framework as a label.

Mikrochim Acta 2019 05 23;186(6):374. Epub 2019 May 23.

School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou, 510006, China.

An ultrasensitive voltammetric aptasensor was constructed to analyze cardiac troponin I (cTnI). It is based on DNA nanotetrahedron (NTH) linked dual-aptamer (dAPT) and magnetic metal organic frameworks (mMOFs) of type [email protected] Firstly, the DNA NTH linked dAPT (Tro4 and Tro6) were immobilized on a gold electrode for improving the capture efficiency of cTnI. The novel mMOFs [email protected] was then decorated by [email protected] nanoparticles ([email protected]), horseradish peroxidase (HRP), G-quadruplex/hemin (GQH) DNAzyme, and two types of aptamers to form signaling nanoprobes. In the presence of cTnI, an aptamer-protein-nanoprobe sandwich-type structure is formed. Afterward, the nanoprobes including enzyme, GQH DNAzyme and [email protected]/[email protected] were utilized to catalyze the oxidation of hydroquinone by hydrogen peroxide for the electrochemical signals amplification, typically at a working potential of -0.1 V (vs. Ag/AgCl). The voltammetric signal increases linearly in the 0.01 to 100 ng·mL cTnI concentration range, and the detection limit is 5.7 pg·mL. Graphical abstract An ultrasensitive voltammetric aptasensor was constructed to analyze cardiac troponin I (cTnI) based on DNA nanotetrahedron linked dual-aptamer and magnetic metal organic frameworks of type [email protected] The results indicated the aptasensor has a wide linear response range (0.01 to 100 ng/mL) and low detection limit (5.74 pg/mL) for cTnI. GE: gold electrode; MCH: 6-Mmercapto-1-hexanol; HRP: horseradish peroxidase; HQ: hydroquinone; BQ: benzoquinone.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00604-019-3470-1DOI Listing
May 2019

Erratum: Author Correction to: TRIM29 negatively controls antiviral immune response through targeting STING for degradation.

Cell Discov 2018 31;4:25. Epub 2018 May 31.

1Department of Rheumatology and Immunology, State Key Laboratory of Biotherapy and Collaborative Innovation Center for Biotherapy, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu, 610041 China.

[This corrects the article DOI: 10.1038/s41421-018-0010-9.].
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41421-018-0031-4DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5976645PMC
May 2018

TRIM29 negatively controls antiviral immune response through targeting STING for degradation.

Cell Discov 2018 20;4:13. Epub 2018 Mar 20.

1Department of Rheumatology and Immunology, State Key Laboratory of Biotherapy and Collaborative Innovation Center for Biotherapy, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu, 610041 China.

Innate immune system is armed by several lines of pattern recognition receptors to sense various viral infection and to initiate antiviral immune response. This process is under a tight control and the negative feedback induced by infection and/or inflammation is critical to maintain immune homoeostasis and to prevent autoimmune disorders, however, the molecular mechanism is not fully understood. Here we report TRIM29, a ubiquitin E3 ligase, functions as an inducible negative regulator of innate immune response triggered by DNA virus and cytosolic DNA. DNA virus and cytosolic DNA stimulation induce TRIM29 expression robustly in macrophages and dendritic cells, although the basal level of TRIM29 is undetectable in those cells. TRIM29 deficiency elevates IFN-I and proinflammatory cytokine production upon viral DNA and cytosolic dsDNA stimulation. Consistently, in vivo experiments show that TRIM29-deficient mice are more resistant to HSV-1 infection than WT controls, indicated by better survival rate and reduced viral load in organs. Mechanism studies suggest that STING-TBK1-IRF3 signaling pathway in TRIM29 KO cells is significantly enhanced and the degradation of STING is impaired. Furthermore, we identify that TRIM29 targets STING for K48 ubiquitination and degradation. This study reveals TRIM29 as a crucial negative regulator in immune response to DNA virus and cytosolic DNA, preventing potential damage caused by overcommitted immune responses.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41421-018-0010-9DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5859251PMC
March 2018

Aucklandia lappa DC. extract enhances gefitinib efficacy in gefitinib-resistance secondary epidermal growth factor receptor mutations.

J Ethnopharmacol 2017 Jul 12;206:353-362. Epub 2017 Jun 12.

School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510006, China.

Ethnopharmacological Relevance: Aucklandia lappa DC. is a widely used medicinal plant in China, India and Pakistan for a long time. Previously, a number of different pharmacological experiments in vitro and in vivo have convincingly demonstrated the abilities of it to exhibit anticancer activities. Reynoutria japonica Houtt. has also been widely used as traditional Chinese medicinal plant. Previous studies have demonstrated that it is bioactive to exhibit anticancer activities.

Aim Of The Study: This study aims to investigate whether the extracts of Aucklandia lappa DC. and Reynoutria japonica Houtt. are capable of treating drug-resistant non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), providing support for novel usage beyond traditional uses.

Materials And Methods: Extracts combined with gefitinib have been tested taking the vulval development of transgenic C. elegans (jgIs25) as an effective and simple in vivo model system, evaluating their efficacy against acquired NSCLC. Synchronous larval 1 (L1) larvae were treated with extracts plus gefitinib and cultured to obtain mainly L4 larvae. The multivulva (Muv) phenotype was recorded at the adult stage.

Results: Our data showed that Aucklandia lappa DC. extract could significantly enhance the efficacy of gefitinib, suppressing the Muv phenotype of jgIs25. Meanwhile, it could also down-regulate the mRNA and protein expression of EGFR in jgIs25. Collectively, our results verified that the capability of Aucklandia lappa DC. to inhibit Muv phenotype may be based on the EGFR signaling pathway inhibition.

Conclusion: We demonstrated that the co-administration of Aucklandia lappa DC. with gefitinib may provide an effective strategy for the therapy of EGFR inhibitor resistant NSCLCs.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jep.2017.06.011DOI Listing
July 2017

Analysis of rice root hair morphology using cryo-scanning electron microscopy.

Methods Mol Biol 2013 ;956:243-8

State Key Laboratory of Plant Physiology and Biochemistry, College of Life Science, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, China.

Root hairs are highly polarized long tubular outgrowths from the surface of epidermal trichoblast cells. Root hair development is a simple process that has facilitated for the study of cell fate determination and tissue differentiation in higher plants. Root hair patterning types in dicot and monocot plants are different. Rice is a monocot model plant with type II root hair pattern. The method to examine root hair fine structure and cell shape in rice may help elucidate the mechanism of cell initiation and differentiation in monocot plants. Compared with the critical-point-drying SEM, the Cryo-SEM method has great advantage, as the Cryo-SEM can well maintain the delicate structure of root hairs in their natural situation. Here we provide the methodology developed to investigate several rice mutants with impaired root hair cells using Cryo-SEM.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-1-62703-194-3_17DOI Listing
April 2013
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