Publications by authors named "Yamila P Cardoso"

5 Publications

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Multilocus phylogeny and historical biogeography of Hypostomus shed light on the processes of fish diversification in La Plata Basin.

Sci Rep 2021 Mar 3;11(1):5073. Epub 2021 Mar 3.

Department of Genetics and Evolution, University of Geneva, 30 quai Ernest Ansermet, 1211, Geneva 4, Switzerland.

Distribution history of the widespread Neotropical genus Hypostomus was studied to shed light on the processes that shaped species diversity. We inferred a calibrated phylogeny, ancestral habitat preference, ancestral areas distribution, and the history of dispersal and vicariance events of this genus. The phylogenetic and distribution analyses indicate that Hypostomus species inhabiting La Plata Basin do not form a monophyletic clade, suggesting that several unrelated ancestral species colonized this basin in the Miocene. Dispersal to other rivers of La Plata Basin started about 8 Mya, followed by habitat shifts and an increased rate of cladogenesis. Amazonian Hypostomus species colonized La Plata Basin several times in the Middle Miocene, probably via the Upper Paraná and the Paraguay rivers that acted as dispersal corridors. During the Miocene, La Plata Basin experienced marine incursions, and geomorphological and climatic changes that reconfigured its drainage pattern, driving dispersal and diversification of Hypostomus. The Miocene marine incursion was a strong barrier and its retraction triggered Hypostomus dispersal, increased speciation rate and ecological diversification. The timing of hydrogeological changes in La Plata Basin coincides well with Hypostomus cladogenetic events, indicating that the history of this basin has acted on the diversification of its biota.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41598-021-83464-xDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7930046PMC
March 2021

Biogeography, habitat transitions and hybridization in a radiation of South American silverside fishes revealed by mitochondrial and genomic RAD data.

Mol Ecol 2020 02 29;29(4):738-751. Epub 2020 Jan 29.

Department of Biological Sciences, George Washington University, Washington, DC, USA.

Rivers and lake systems in the southern cone of South America have been widely influenced by historical glaciations, carrying important implications for the evolution of aquatic organisms, including prompting transitions between marine and freshwater habitats and by triggering hybridization among incipient species via waterway connectivity and stream capture events. Silverside fishes (Odontesthes) in the region comprise a radiation of 19 marine and freshwater species that have been hypothesized on the basis of morphological or mitochondrial DNA data to have either transitioned repeatedly into continental waters from the sea or colonized marine habitats following freshwater diversification. New double digest restriction-site associated DNA data presented here provide a robust framework to investigate the biogeographical history of and habitat transitions in Odontesthes. We show that Odontesthes silversides originally diversified in the Pacific but independently colonized the Atlantic three times, producing three independent marine-to-freshwater transitions. Our results also indicate recent introgression of marine mitochondrial haplotypes into two freshwater clades, with more recurring instances of hybridization among Atlantic- versus Pacific-slope species. In Pacific freshwater drainages, hybridization with a marine species appears to be geographically isolated and may be related to glaciation events. Substantial structural differences of estuarine gradients between these two geographical areas may have influenced the frequency, intensity and evolutionary effects of hybridization events.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/mec.15350DOI Listing
February 2020

An integrated approach clarifies the cryptic diversity in Hypostomus Lacépède 1803 from the Lower La Plata Basin.

An Acad Bras Cienc 2019 25;91(2):e20180131. Epub 2019 Apr 25.

Département de Génétique et Évolution, Université de Genève, 30 quai Ernest Ansermet, 1211, Genève 4, Switzerland.

Hypostomus commersoni Valenciennes 1836, Hypostomus cordovae (Günther 1880) and Hypostomus laplatae (Eigenmann 1907) have been little studied since their original descriptions. This study shows a comprehensive review of these species from the Lower La Plata Basin, including their taxonomic history, distribution, color patterns, morphology, and ecological and molecular phylogenetic data. Morphological and phylogenetic analyses based on D-loop sequences suggested that H. commersoni can be separated into two subclades, or subgroups. Based on these results and on the non-overlapping distribution range of the two subclades, we conclude that they represent two distinct species, thereby revalidating H. spiniger. The results also suggest that H. paranensis should be considered as species inquirenda and H. cordovae as valid species. This integrated approach provides key information for assessing the conservation status and biogeographic aspects of the genus Hypostomus in the Lower La Plata Basin.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1590/0001-3765201920180131DOI Listing
June 2019

A continental-wide molecular approach unraveling mtDNA diversity and geographic distribution of the Neotropical genus Hoplias.

PLoS One 2018 13;13(8):e0202024. Epub 2018 Aug 13.

Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas, Buenos Aires, Argentina.

With an estimate of around 9,000 species, the Neotropical region hosts the greatest diversity of freshwater fishes of the world. Genetic surveys have the potential to unravel isolated and unique lineages and may result in the identification of undescribed species, accelerating the cataloguing of extant biodiversity. In this paper, molecular diversity within the valuable and widespread Neotropical genus Hoplias was assessed by means of DNA Barcoding. The geographic coverage spanned 40 degrees of latitude from French Guiana to Argentina. Our analyses revealed 22 mitochondrial lineages fully supported by means of Barcode Index Number, Automatic Barcode Gap Discovery and phylogenetic analyses. This mtDNA survey revealed the existence of 15 fully supported mitochondrial lineages within the once considered to be the continentally distributed H. malabaricus. Only four of them are currently described as valid species however, leaving 11 mitochondrial lineages currently "masked" within this species complex. Mean genetic divergence was 13.1%. Barcoding gap analysis discriminated 20 out of the 22 lineages tested. Phylogenetic analyses showed that all taxonomically recognized species form monophyletic groups. Hoplias malabaricus sensu stricto clustered within a large clade, excluding the representatives of the La Plata River Basin. In the H. lacerdae group, all species but H. curupira showed a cohesive match between taxonomic and molecular identification. Two different genetic lineages were recovered for H. aimara. Given the unexpected hidden mitochondrial diversity within H. malabaricus, the COI sequence composition of specimens from Suriname (the type locality), identified as H. malabaricus sensu stricto, is of major importance.
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http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0202024PLOS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6089427PMC
January 2019

Unexpected diversity in the catfish Pseudancistrus brevispinis reveals dispersal routes in a Neotropical center of endemism: the Guyanas Region.

Mol Ecol 2009 Mar;18(5):947-64

Department of Zoology and Animal Biology, University of Geneva, 30 Quai Ernest Ansermet, 1211 Geneva 4, Switzerland.

Neotropical freshwater fishes have reached an unrivalled diversity, organized into several areas of endemism, yet the underlying processes are still largely unknown. The topographical and ecological characteristics of the Guyanas Region make it an ideal area of endemism in which to investigate the forces that have shaped this great diversity. This region is thought to be inhabited by species descending from Amazonian ancestors, which would have used two documented routes that, however, hardly explain the entrance of species adapted to running waters. Here, we investigate the evolutionary history of Pseudancistrus brevispinis, a catfish endemic to this region and exclusively found in running waters, thus making it an ideal model for investigating colonization routes and dispersal in such habitats. Our analyses, based on mitochondrial and nuclear markers, revealed an unexpected diversity consisting of six monophyletic lineages within P. brevispinis, showing a disjoint distribution pattern. The lineages endemic to Guyanas coastal rivers form a monophyletic group that originated via an ancestral colonization event from the Amazon basin. Evidence given favours a colonization pathway through river capture between an Amazonian tributary and the Upper Maroni River. Population genetic analyses of the most widespread species indicate that subsequent dispersal among Guyanas coastal rivers occurred principally by temporary connections between adjacent rivers during periods of lower sea level, yet instances of dispersal via interbasin river captures are not excluded. During high sea level intervals, the isolated populations would have diverged leading to the observed allopatric species. This evolutionary process is named the sea level fluctuation (SLF) hypothesis of diversification.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-294X.2008.04068.xDOI Listing
March 2009