Publications by authors named "Yalin Zhan"

8 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Pro-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-6-induced hepcidin, a key mediator of periodontitis-related anemia of inflammation.

J Periodontal Res 2021 Mar 3. Epub 2021 Mar 3.

Department of Periodontology, Peking University School and Hospital of Stomatology & National Clinical Research Center for Oral Diseases & National Engineering Laboratory for Digital and Material Technology of Stomatology & Beijing Key Laboratory of Digital Stomatology, Beijing, China.

Objectives: To investigate whether anemia of inflammation (AI) occurs in periodontitis patients and to further explore underlying pathogenesis of periodontitis-related AI by an experimental periodontitis model.

Background: Previous studies have reported periodontitis patients could show a tendency toward AI. However, the relationship between periodontitis and AI remains unclear, and the related pathological mechanisms have not been identified.

Materials And Methods: Periodontal clinical parameters, inflammatory markers, and anemia-related indicators were compared between 98 aggressive periodontitis (AgP) patients and 103 healthy subjects. An experimental periodontitis model was induced by ligature placement in mice. The changes in mice inflammatory markers, anemia indicators, hepcidin mRNA expression, and serum hepcidin concentrations were measured. Human and mouse liver cells were treated with interleukin-6 (IL-6) for analyzing the changes in hepcidin expression based on mRNA and protein levels.

Results: AgP patients exhibited higher white blood cell counts, IL-6, and C-reactive protein. Adjusted linear regression analyses showed correlations between AgP and decreased hemoglobin (HGB) and hematocrit (HCT). The ligature-induced periodontitis caused systemic inflammation and elevated IL-6 levels. Lower red blood cell counts, HGB, and HCT were detected, whereas the levels of hepcidin mRNA expression and serum hepcidin concentrations increased. The treatment of hepatocytes with IL-6 induced both hepcidin mRNA expression and hepcidin secretion.

Conclusions: Systemic inflammation induced by periodontitis leads to an increased risk for AI. IL-6-induced hepcidin could play a central mediator role and act as a key pathologic mechanism. Our results demonstrate periodontitis may be considered as an additional inflammatory disease contributing to the development of AI.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/jre.12865DOI Listing
March 2021

Evaluation of a dynamic navigation system for training students in dental implant placement.

J Dent Educ 2021 Feb 10;85(2):120-127. Epub 2020 Sep 10.

First Clinical Division, Peking University School and Hospital of Stomatology, Beijing, China.

Objective: Computer-guided simulation systems may offer a novel training approach in many surgical fields. This study aimed to compare dental students' learning progress in dental implants placement between a dynamic navigation system and a traditional training method using a simulation model.

Methods: Senior dental students with no implant placement experience were randomly assigned to implant placement training using a dynamic navigation system or a traditional freehand protocol. After training, 3-dimensional (3D) deviation at implant platform, 3D deviation at implant apex, and deviation of implant axis between the planned and placed implant positions were measured using superimposed cone beam computed tomography scans.

Results: Six students were trained in this study. Students showed significantly greater improvement in implant placement after training using the dynamic navigation system than after using the traditional freehand protocol. Overall deviation of implant axis (P < 0.001) and 3D apex deviation (P = 0.014) improved with training using the dynamic navigation system, but differences in 3D platform deviation (P = 0.513) were not statistically significant.

Conclusions: A dynamic navigation system may be a useful teaching tool in the early development of clinical skills in implant placement for the novice practitioners. Novice practitioners exhibited significant improvement in angulation deviation across implant placement attempts with dynamic navigation system training.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jdd.12399DOI Listing
February 2021

Platelets as inflammatory mediators in a murine model of periodontitis.

J Clin Periodontol 2020 05 12;47(5):572-582. Epub 2020 Mar 12.

Department of Periodontology, Peking University School and Hospital of Stomatology & National Clinical Research Center for Oral Diseases & National Engineering Laboratory for Digital and Material Technology of Stomatology & Beijing Key Laboratory of Digital Stomatology, Beijing, China.

Aim: To investigate the role of platelets during the development of ligature-induced experimental periodontitis in mice.

Materials And Methods: Experimental periodontitis was induced by placement of sterilized 5-0 cotton ligatures around the maxillary and mandibular second molars of C57BL/6 wild-type mice. Flow cytometry was used to analyse platelet activation and platelet-leucocyte aggregate formation, and histologic analysis was used to evaluate inflammation and localization of platelets and leucocytes in periodontal tissues during the development of experimental periodontitis and in experimental periodontitis with and without antiplatelet drug treatment.

Results: Experimental periodontitis induced platelet activation and platelet-leucocyte interaction. Platelets and leucocytes gradually infiltrated in inflammatory gingival tissues during the development of experimental periodontitis. The inhibition of platelet activation via drug therapy led to significant inhibition of leucocyte migration and marked reduction in periodontal inflammation.

Conclusion: This study revealed that platelets are critical for inflammation and tissue injury in periodontitis and serve as mediators of inflammation in periodontal tissue.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/jcpe.13265DOI Listing
May 2020

Clinical evaluation of ultrasonic subgingival debridement versus ultrasonic subgingival scaling combined with manual root planing in the treatment of periodontitis: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

Trials 2020 Jan 28;21(1):113. Epub 2020 Jan 28.

Department of Periodontology, Peking University School and Hospital of Stomatology and National Engineering Laboratory for Digital and Material Technology of Stomatology and Beijing Key Laboratory of Digital Stomatology, 22 Zhongguancun South Avenue, Haidian District, Beijing, 100081, People's Republic of China.

Background: Periodontal diseases are regarded as the most common diseases of mankind. The prevalence rate of periodontal disease assumes a clear growth tendency, increasing by 57.3% from 1990 to 2010. Thereby, effective periodontal therapy is still a long-term task and a difficult problem. The goals of periodontal therapy are to eliminate the infectious and inflammatory processes of periodontal diseases. Root planing, in order to eliminate the "infected cementum," has been an important step in the treatment of periodontitis since the 1970s. However, along with the understanding of the effects of endotoxin on the root surface, the necessity of manual root planing has been gradually queried. Ultrasonic instruments, which are more recent innovations, would not remove the cementum excessively, and are also more time-saving and labor-saving compared to using hand instruments. Hence, an increasing number of dentists prefer to do scaling with ultrasonic instruments only. However, the necessity of root planing remains emphasized in the international mainstream views of periodontal mechanical treatment. Therefore, this study is devoted to compare the clinical effect of ultrasonic subgingival debridement and ultrasonic subgingival scaling combined with manual root planing, which takes the implementation of root planing as the only variable and is more in line with the current clinical situation, thus hoping to provide some valuable reference to dentists.

Methods/design: Forty adult patients who fit the inclusion criteria are being recruited from the Peking University Hospital of Stomatology (Beijing, China). By means of randomization tables, one quadrant of the upper and lower teeth is the test group and the other is the control group. Test group: ultrasonic subgingival scaling combined with manual root planing.

Control Group: ultrasonic subgingival debridement. In a 24-week follow-up period, plaque index, probing depth, clinical attachment loss, bleeding index, furcation involvement, mobility, and patient-reported outcome (Visual Analog Scale for pain and sensitivity) will be observed and documented.

Discussion: This study evaluates the effectiveness of ultrasonic subgingival scaling combined with manual root planing and ultrasonic subgingival debridement alone in the nonsurgical treatment of periodontitis with a split-mouth design after 1, 3 and 6 months. The result of the trial should potentially contribute to an advanced treatment strategy for periodontitis with an ideal clinical outcome.

Trial Registration: International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP), ID: ChiCTR1800017122. Registered on 12 July 2018.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13063-019-4031-yDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6988244PMC
January 2020

Up-regulated ferritin in periodontitis promotes inflammatory cytokine expression in human periodontal ligament cells through transferrin receptor via ERK/P38 MAPK pathways.

Clin Sci (Lond) 2019 01 11;133(1):135-148. Epub 2019 Jan 11.

Department of Periodontology, Peking University School and Hospital of Stomatology, 22 Zhongguancun South Avenue, Haidian District, Beijing 100081, P.R. China

Objective: Ferritin, an iron-binding protein, is ubiquitous and highly conserved; it plays a crucial role in inflammation, which is the main symptom of periodontitis. Full-length cDNA library analyses have demonstrated abundant expression of ferritin in human periodontal ligament. The aims of the present study were to explore how ferritin is regulated by local inflammation, and to investigate its functions and mechanisms of action in the process of periodontitis.

Methods: Human gingival tissues were collected from periodontitis patients and healthy individuals. Experimental periodontitis was induced by ligature of second molars in mice. The expression of ferritin light polypeptide (FTL) and ferritin heavy polypeptide (FTH) were assessed by immunohistochemistry. Meanwhile, after stimulating human periodontal ligament cells (HPDLCs) with -lipopolysaccharide (LPS), interleukin (IL)-6, and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), the expression of FTH and FTL were measured. Then, IL-6 and IL-8 were measured after incubation with different concentrations of apoferritin (iron-free ferritin) and several intracellular signaling pathway inhibitors, or after knockdown of the transferrin receptor.

Results: Both FTH and FTL were substantially higher in inflamed periodontal tissues than in healthy tissues. The location of the elevated expression correlated well with the extent of inflammatory infiltration. Moreover, expression of FTH and FTL were enhanced after stimulation with -LPS, IL-6, TNF-α. Apoferritin induced the production of IL-6 and IL-8 in a dose-dependent manner partly through binding to the transferrin receptor and activating ERK/P38 signaling pathways in HPDLCs.

Conclusions: Ferritin is up-regulated by inflammation and exhibits cytokine-like activity in HPDLCs inducing a signaling cascade that promotes expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines associated with periodontitis.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1042/CS20180679DOI Listing
January 2019

Population-Genomic Insights into Variation in and Isolates and Its Association with Periodontal Disease.

Front Cell Infect Microbiol 2017 21;7:409. Epub 2017 Sep 21.

Computational Genomics Lab, Beijing Institutes of Life Science, Chinese Academy of SciencesBeijing, China.

High-throughput sequencing has helped to reveal the close relationship between and periodontal disease, but the roles of subspecies diversity and genomic variation within this genus in periodontal diseases still need to be investigated. We performed a comparative genome analysis of 48 and isolates that from the same cohort of subjects to identify the main drivers of their pathogenicity and adaptation to different environments. The comparisons were done between two species and between disease and health based on pooled sequences. The results showed that both and have highly dynamic genomes and can take up various exogenous factors through horizontal gene transfer. The major differences between disease-derived and health-derived samples of and were factors related to genome modification and recombination, indicating that the isolates from disease sites may be more capable of genomic reconstruction. We also identified genetic elements specific to each sample, and found that disease groups had more unique virulence factors related to capsule and lipopolysaccharide synthesis, secretion systems, proteinases, and toxins, suggesting that strains from disease sites may have more specific virulence, particularly for . The differentially represented pathways between samples from disease and health were related to energy metabolism, carbohydrate and lipid metabolism, and amino acid metabolism, consistent with data from the whole subgingival microbiome in periodontal disease and health. Disease-derived samples had gained or lost several metabolic genes compared to healthy-derived samples, which could be linked with the difference in virulence performance between diseased and healthy sample groups. Our findings suggest that and may serve as "crucial substances" in subgingival plaque, which may reflect changes in microbial and environmental dynamics in subgingival microbial ecosystems. This provides insight into the potential of and as new predictive biomarkers and targets for effective interventions in periodontal disease.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fcimb.2017.00409DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5613308PMC
June 2018

The role of platelets in inflammatory immune responses in generalized aggressive periodontitis.

J Clin Periodontol 2017 02 9;44(2):150-157. Epub 2017 Jan 9.

Department of Periodontology, Peking University School and Hospital of Stomatology & National Engineering Laboratory for Digital and Material Technology of Stomatology & Beijing Key Laboratory of Digital Stomatology, Beijing, China.

Aim: To investigate the relationship between inflammatory markers and platelet size in generalized aggressive periodontitis (GAgP).

Material And Methods: Periodontal, inflammatory and platelet indices were compared between 59 GAgP patients and 59 healthy subjects. Gingival biopsies from five patients and five healthy subjects were examined by immunohistochemistry and electron microscopy. Changes in patient periodontal and platelet indices were re-evaluated at 3 months after periodontal therapy.

Results: Platelet size was decreased significantly in GAgP patients compared to healthy subjects (p ≤ 0.003). Weak negative correlations between platelet size and periodontal parameters were found in GAgP patients (p ≤ 0.025). Platelet aggregates and adhesion to the endothelium or leucocytes were found in venules and connective tissues of gingival biopsies from GAgP patients. Mean platelet volume (MPV) and platelet large cell ratio increased after periodontal therapy in GAgP patients (p ≤ 0.038). The increase in MPV was related to the decrease in bleeding index in GAgP patients after periodontal therapy (p < 0.001; r = 0.357).

Conclusion: Platelet size was reduced in GAgP patients compared to healthy controls, possibly due to the consumption of large platelets at sites of periodontal inflammation. Platelets may be involved in host responses to periodontal infection in GAgP.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/jcpe.12657DOI Listing
February 2017

Platelet activation and platelet-leukocyte interaction in generalized aggressive periodontitis.

J Leukoc Biol 2016 11 22;100(5):1155-1166. Epub 2016 Jun 22.

Department of Periodontology, Peking University School and Hospital of Stomatology, Beijing, China.

Generalized aggressive periodontitis (GAgP) is an inflammatory disease of host response to bacterial challenge. To explore the role of platelets in host-microbial interactions in patients with periodontitis, 124 patients with GAgP and 57 healthy subjects were enrolled. Reliable indicators of subclinical platelet functional status, platelet count (PLT), platelet large cell ratio (PLCR), and mean platelet volume (MPV), were significantly lower in the GAgP group than in the control group and were negatively correlated with clinical periodontal parameters. The levels of important cytosolic protein in neutrophils, calprotectin (S100A8/A9) in plasma, and gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) were significantly higher in patients with GAgP compared with healthy subjects. Moreover, the GCF calprotectin level was negatively correlated with PLCR and MPV values. To explore the possible mechanisms of changes in platelet indices in periodontitis, flow cytometry analysis was performed, and patients with GAgP were found to have a higher status of platelet activation compared with healthy controls. Porphyromonas gingivalis (P. gingivalis) and recombinant human S100A8/A9 (rhS100A8/A9) induced platelet activation and facilitated platelet-leukocyte aggregate formation in whole blood of healthy subjects. In response to P. gingivalis and rhS100A8/A9, platelets from patients with GAgP increased activation and increased formation of platelet-leukocyte aggregates compared with those from healthy subjects. Platelet aggregates and platelets attached to leukocytes were found on gingival tissues from patients with GAgP, suggesting that decreased platelet size and count in the circulation might be related to consumption of large, activated platelets at inflamed gingiva. Platelets may have a previously unrecognized role in host response to periodontal infection.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1189/jlb.4A1115-526RRDOI Listing
November 2016