Publications by authors named "Y Xiong"

6,479 Publications

Identification of autophagy-related genes signature predicts chemotherapeutic and immunotherapeutic efficiency in bladder cancer (BLCA).

J Cell Mol Med 2021 May 7. Epub 2021 May 7.

Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Nephrology, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden, The Netherlands.

Autophagy maintains cellular homeostasis by degrading and recycling cytoplasmic components under stress conditions, which is identified to be involved in tumorigenesis and now has been recognized as novel target in cancer treatment. In present study, we gathered total autophagy-related genes and established an autophagy-related genes signature (ATGRS) through LASSO cox regression analysis in BLCA. Kaplan-Meier survival and multivariate cox regression analyses both showed the ATGRS was a robust independent prognostic factor with high accuracy. Subsequently, integrated analyses indicated that ATGRS had a strong correlation with molecular subtypes, clinicopathological characteristics and somatic mutation alteration. Moreover, ATGRS was found to be positively correlated with the infiltration of immune cells in tumour microenvironment (TME) and immune checkpoint expression, indicating the potent role of autophagy by regulating the TME. In addition, ATGRS was proved to be efficient in predicting the clinical benefit of immune checkpoint inhibitors (ICIs) based immunotherapy and chemotherapy in BLCA. Furthermore, we observed abnormal expression levels of autophagy-related genes and found the different behaviour of ATGRS in pancancer by LASSO cox regression analysis. Therefore, construction of ATGRS in BLCA could help us to interpret the underlying mechanism of autophagy and sheds a light on the clinical application for a combination of autophagy modification with targeted immunotherapy and chemotherapy in BLCA.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/jcmm.16552DOI Listing
May 2021

Transcriptomic Analysis Reveals an Altered Hcy Metabolism in the Stria Vascularis of the Pendred Syndrome Mouse Model.

Neural Plast 2021 17;2021:5585394. Epub 2021 Apr 17.

Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Shanghai Jiao Tong University Affiliated Sixth People's Hospital, Shanghai, China.

Purpose: mice exhibit severer defects in the development of the cochlea and develop deafness, while the underlying mechanisms responsible for these effects remain unclear. Our study was to investigate the potential mechanism linking deficiency to hearing loss.

Materials And Methods: RNA sequencing was applied to analyze the differential gene expression of the stria vascularis (SV) from wildtype and mice. GO and KEGG pathway analysis were performed. Quantitative RT-PCR was applied to validate the expression of candidate genes affected by . ELISA and immunofluorescence technique were used to detect the homocysteine (Hcy) level in serum, brain, and SV, respectively.

Results: 183 upregulated genes and 63 downregulated genes were identified in the SV associated with depletion. Transcriptomic profiling revealed that deficiency significantly affected the expression of genes associated with cell adhesion, transmembrane transport, and the biogenesis of multicellular organisms. The SV from mice exhibited a higher expression of mRNAs, as well as altered homocysteine (Hcy) metabolism.

Conclusions: The altered expression of results in a dramatic change in multiple biochemical reactions and a disruption of nutrient homeostasis in the endolymph which may contribute to hearing loss of knockout mouse.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2021/5585394DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8075705PMC
April 2021

Genetic Associations with Stable Warfarin Dose Requirements in Han Chinese Patients.

J Cardiovasc Pharmacol 2021 May 4. Epub 2021 May 4.

Shanghai Key Laboratory of Psychotic Disorders, Shanghai Mental Health Center, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai, China Bio-X Institutes, Key Laboratory for the Genetics of Developmental and Neuropsychiatric Disorders (Ministry of Education), Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200030, China Shanghai Institute of Cardiovascular Diseases, Zhongshan Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai 200032, China Laiwu People's Hospital, Laiwu, Shandong 271100, China Laigang Hospital, Laiwu, Shandong 271126, China Shanghai Baio Technology Co., Ltd. Shanghai 200233, China Fudan University, Shanghai 200032, China The Third Affiliated Hospital, Guangzhou Medical University, Guangzhou 510150, China.

Abstract: Warfarin is a commonly prescribed anticoagulant for valvular heart disease that plays an important role in clinical management to prevent thrombotic events. In this study, we aim to perform a comprehensive study to investigate the genetic biomarkers of stable warfarin dose in the Han Chinese population. We performed an integrative study on 211 Han Chinese patients with valvular heart disease. A total of 40 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 10 important genes (CYP2C9, VKORC1, ABCB1, CYP4F2, APOE, PROC, GGCX, EPHX1, CALU and SETD1A) which are involved in the warfarin metabolic pathway and equilibrium of coagulation and anti-coagulation were selected. We applied MassARRAY technology to genotype the 40 SNPs identified in these Han Chinese patients. Our results showed that 13 SNPs on 6 genes (CYP2C9, VKORC1, ABCB1, PROC, EPHX1 and SETD1A) were associated with the individual stable warfarin dose. Two VKORC1 SNPs (rs9934438 and rs2359612) were the strongest genetic factors determining warfarin dose requirements (P=8×10-6 and 9×10-6, respectively). Rs4889599 in SETD1A was first reported to be associated with warfarin dose at a significant level of 0.001 in our study (Padjust=0.040 after Bonferroni correction). We discovered that, genetic variants in CYP2C9, VKORC1, ABCB1, PROC, EPHX1 and SETD1A may affect the stable warfarin dose requirement in Han Chinese patients with valvular disease. The discovery of these potential genetic markers will facilitate the development of advanced personalized anticoagulation therapy in Han Chinese patients.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/FJC.0000000000001048DOI Listing
May 2021

Emerging roles of nucleotide metabolism in cancer development: progress and prospect.

Aging (Albany NY) 2021 May 5;13. Epub 2021 May 5.

Institute of Gastrointestinal Oncology, School of Medicine, Xiamen University, Fujian, Xiamen 361000, China.

Abnormal cancer metabolism occurs throughout the development of tumors. Recent studies have shown that abnormal nucleotide metabolism not only accelerates the development of tumors but also inhibits the normal immune response in the tumor microenvironment. Although few relevant experiments and reports are available, study of the interaction between nucleotide metabolism and cancer development is rapidly developing. The intervention, alteration or regulation of molecular mechanisms related to abnormal nucleotide metabolism in tumor cells has become a new idea and strategy for the treatment of tumors and prevention of recurrence and metastasis. Determining how nucleotide metabolism regulates the occurrence and progression of tumors still needs long-term and extensive research and exploration.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.18632/aging.202962DOI Listing
May 2021

R and nlmixr as a gateway between statistics and pharmacometrics.

CPT Pharmacometrics Syst Pharmacol 2021 Apr;10(4):283-285

Novartis Pharmaceuticals, Inc, Fort Worth, Texas, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/psp4.12618DOI Listing
April 2021