Publications by authors named "Y Glèlè-Ahanhanzo"

12 Publications

"My right to walk, my right to live": pedestrian fatalities, roads and environmental features in Benin.

BMC Public Health 2021 01 19;21(1):162. Epub 2021 Jan 19.

Public Health School (Université Libre de Bruxelles) - Center for Research in Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Clinical Research, Brussels, Belgium.

Background: The implementation of road safety interventions in many developing countries usually focuses on the behavior of users. In order to draw more attention on the role of road infrastructure and physical environment in road safety interventions, this study aims to analyze the environmental and road factors associated with the pedestrians involved in traffic crashes in Benin.

Method: The method used was an analysis of national road crash statistics for the period 2008 to 2015. The information available included the circumstances surrounding the collision, the road infrastructure, the vehicles and the individuals involved. A multiple logistic regression was used to identify predictors of pedestrian mortality in traffic crashes.

Results: During the period studied, 3760 crashes involved at least one pedestrian. The death rate among these pedestrians was 27.74% (CI 95%: 26.31-29.20). The mortality predictors were the area in which the crash occurred (OR = 4.94; CI 95%: 4.10-5.94), the day of the crash (OR = 2.17; CI 95%:1.34-3.52), light levels (OR = 1.30; CI 95%: 1.06-1.59), road classification (OR = 1.79; CI 95%: 1.46-2.20), the condition of the road surface (2.04, CI 95%: 1.41-2.95) and the position of the pedestrian during the crash (OR = 1.69; CI 95%: 1.19-2.38).

Conclusions: These results support the need for a holistic approach to interventions aiming to tackle deaths on roads. Interventions should integrate environmental factors for greater pedestrian safety around roads with appropriate signs, roads in good condition and awareness campaigns for a proper use of road infrastructures.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12889-021-10192-2DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7816405PMC
January 2021

Can Professional Motorcyclists Be an Asset in the Immediate Post-Crash Care System in Benin? Baseline of Knowledge and Practices in the City of Cotonou (Benin).

Open Access Emerg Med 2021 6;13:1-11. Epub 2021 Jan 6.

Health Policies and Systems Department, Regional Institute of Public Health, Ouidah, Benin.

Purpose: The situation of road crashes-related deaths remains problematic in low-income countries. The present study aims at analyzing the first-aid knowledge and practices of professional motorcyclists (PMs) in the city of Cotonou in Benin.

Materials And Methods: This is a cross-sectional analytical study conducted from 25 March to 19 April 2019 in Cotonou and concerned PMs registered in a fleet who gave their consent to participate in the study. The World Health Organization's two-stage adaptive cluster sampling technique was applied to select the eligible PMs while respecting the proportionality rate per fleet. A logistic regression analysis was done and the odds ratios were estimated with 95% confidence interval.

Results: The 430 PMs surveyed were all middle-aged men with an average age of 38.38 (±8.70). Among them, 62.56% knew at least one of the emergency phone numbers for the ambulance, police or fire services and 49.53% of the PMs knew at least one of the 3 techniques evaluated. In addition, 33.23% of PMs who had witnessed at least an RC stated that they had alerted the emergency services, and 32.27% said they had helped the victims. The main reason given for the lack of initiative in RCs was lack of knowledge of the course of action to take (19.64%). The level of knowledge was associated with the level of education (AOR: 3.11; CI 95%: 1.79-5.43) and with the length of experience (AOR: 2.56; CI 95%: 1.58-4.18).

Conclusion: This study reveals that the level of knowledge and practice of PMs in the field of first aid in Cotonou is low and demonstrates the relevance and the need to include this target group in the first-aid chain for road crashes in Benin.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/OAEM.S267828DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7797346PMC
January 2021

HIV incidence and risk contributing factors among men who have sex with men in Benin: A prospective cohort study.

PLoS One 2020 9;15(6):e0233624. Epub 2020 Jun 9.

Population Health and Best Practices in Health Axis Quebec City University Hospital Research Center Laval University, Hôpital du Saint-Sacrement, Québec, Canada.

Men who have sex with Men (MSM) are a key population in the transmission of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) infection. In Benin, there is a lack of strategic information to offer appropriate interventions for these populations who live hidden due to their stigmatization and discrimination. The objective is to identify contributing factors that affect HIV incidence in the MSM population. Study of a prospective cohort of 358 HIV-negative MSM, aged 18 years and over, reporting having had at least one oral or anal relationship with another man during the last 12 months, prior to recruitment. The monitoring lasted 30 months with a follow-up visit every six months. Univariate analyses and a Cox proportional hazards multivariate regression were used to examine the association between bio-behavioral, socio-demographic and knowledge-related characteristics with HIV incidence. The retention rate for the follow-up of the 358 participants was 94.5%. On the 813.5 person-years of follow-up, 48 seroconversions with an HIV incidence of 5.91 per 100 person-years were observed (95% CI: 4.46-7.85). Factors associated with the high risk of HIV were age (HR = 0.4; 95% CI: 0.2-0.8), living in couple (HR = 0.5 95% CI: 0.2-0.96) and the lack of condom systematic use with a male partner during high-risk sex (HR = 3.9; 95% CI: 1.4-11.1). HIV incidence is high within MSM population and particularly among young people. Targeted, suitable and cost-effective interventions for the delivery of the combination prevention package in an environment free of stigma and discrimination are necessary and vital for reaching the 90x90x90 target.
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http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0233624PLOS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7282649PMC
August 2020

[Sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine-based intermittent preventive treatment in pregnant women and its effect on birth weight: application of 3-dosing regimen in the urban area of South Benin in 2017].

Pan Afr Med J 2019 20;34:155. Epub 2019 Nov 20.

Département de Promotion de la Santé, Institut Régional de Santé Publique, Université d'Abomey-Calavi, Bénin.

Introduction: Malaria is a major public health problem, responsible for many complications during pregnancy including inadequate intra-uterine growth and hypotrophies. The aim of this study was to determine the adherence to the 3 doses of sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine-based intermittent preventive treatment (IPT) on birthweight in the Cotonou health zone II and III.

Methods: We conducted a cross-sectional study focusing on 630 women in the postpartum period residing in the Cotonou health zone II and III and selected using a two stage sample. Data were collected through a questionnaire and a data processing form. For analysis, data were weighted and we used variance analysis to compare means and to compare proportions with Chi-square Test including estimates regarding the strength of the association by odds ratio (OR) and confidence interval at 95%.

Results: Adherence to the 3 doses of sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine-based intermittent preventive treatment was 34.08% (CI95%: 24.84% 43.30%]. A significant birthweight-gain of 264.5 g (p < 0.001) in mothers who had received more than 3 doses of sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine-based intermittent preventive treatment and chances of having low birth weight baby was lower (OR = 0.45; p = 0.001) among these mothers compared to those who had received less than 3 doses of sulfadoxine pyrimethamine.

Conclusion: This study highlights low adherence to the new 3-dose regimen of sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine-based intermittent preventive treatment in the Cotonou health zone II and III, but it reflects its potential to contribute to the reduction of the risk of low birth weight. Strategies must therefore be implemented to strengthen its application for prevention of malaria and of its consequences on vulnerable targets.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.11604/pamj.2019.34.155.19357DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7046103PMC
March 2020

[Sexual Behaviours at Risk of HIV Infection among Male to Female Transgender People in Benin].

Bull Soc Pathol Exot 2020 ;113(3):298-305

Plan international Bénin, Cotonou, Bénin.

Transgender people are a population vulnerable to the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) due to frequent adoption of risky sexual behaviours. To reorient prevention interventions in this population, this study aims to identify factors associated with high-risk sexual behaviours. It's a cross-sectional study. The subjects were recruited by driven respondents sampling throughout the country in December 2017. They included subjects who identified themselves as Male to Female transgender and who adopted such an image. The data were collected by questionnaire. The variables were multi-partnership and condom use during sex. Proportion comparisons were made with Pearson's Chi2 test and multiple logistic modeling was performed. The prevalence of multipartnership was 83.85% and the prevalence of condom use during last intercourse was 92.41%. Sexual risk behaviours were associated with age (P = 0.004), occupation (P = 0.000), education level (P = 0.025), family and friends' attitudes towards transgender status (P = 0.044) and HIV prevention knowledge level (P < 0.05). The factors identified should be integrated into transgender interventions in Benin with a focus on improving knowledge in HIV prevention.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3166/bspe-2021-0158DOI Listing
January 2020