Publications by authors named "Xunyi Wang"

5 Publications

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Objective and Subjective Outcomes in Patients with Hearing Aids: A Cross-Sectional, Comparative, Associational Study.

Audiol Neurootol 2021 Jul 28:1-9. Epub 2021 Jul 28.

Hearing Center/Hearing and Speech Laboratory, Department of Otorhinolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu, China.

Introduction: Outcome assessment for hearing aids (HAs) is an essential part of HA fitting and validation. There is no consensus about the best or standard approach for evaluating HA outcomes. And, the relationship between objective and subjective measures is ambiguous. This study aimed to determine the outcomes after HA fitting, explore correlations between subjective benefit and acoustic gain improvement as well as objective audiologic tests, and investigate several variables that may improve patients' perceived benefits.

Methods: Eighty adults with bilateral symmetrical hearing loss using HAs for at least 1 month were included in this study. All subjects completed the pure tone average (PTA) threshold and word recognition score (WRS) tests in unaided and aided conditions. We also administered the Chinese version of International Outcome Inventory for Hearing Aids (IOI-HA), to measure participants' subjective benefits. Objective HA benefit (acoustic gain improvement) was defined as the difference in thresholds or scores between aided and unaided conditions indicated with ΔPTA and ΔWRS. Thus, patients' baseline hearing levels were taken into account. Correlations were assessed among objective audiologic tests (PTA and WRS), acoustic gain improvement (ΔPTA and ΔWRS), multiple potential factors, and IOI-HA overall scores.

Results: PTA decreased significantly, but WRS did not increase when aided listening was compared to unaided listening. Negative correlations between PTAs and IOI-HA scores were significant but weak (r = -0.370 and r = -0.393, all p < 0.05). Significant weak positive correlations were found between WRSs and IOI-HA (r = 0.386 and r = 0.309, all p < 0.05). However, there was no correlation among ΔPTA, ΔWRS, and IOI-HA (r = 0.056 and r = -0.086, all p > 0.05). Moreover, 2 nonaudiological factors (age and daily use time) were significantly correlated with IOI-HA (r = -0.269 and r = 0.242, all p < 0.05).

Conclusions: Correlations among objective audiologic tests, acoustic gain, and subjective patient-reported outcomes were weak or absent. Subjective questionnaires and objective tests do not reflect the same hearing capability. Therefore, it is advisable to evaluate both objective and subjective outcomes when analyzing HA benefits on a regular basis and pay equal attention to nonaudiological and audiological factors.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000516623DOI Listing
July 2021

Correction: Good News and Bad News About Incentives to Violate the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA): Scenario-Based Questionnaire Study.

JMIR Med Inform 2020 Sep 15;8(9):e24243. Epub 2020 Sep 15.

State University of New York at Buffalo, Buffalo, NY, United States.

[This corrects the article DOI: 10.2196/15880.].
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http://dx.doi.org/10.2196/24243DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7525400PMC
September 2020

Good News and Bad News About Incentives to Violate the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA): Scenario-Based Questionnaire Study.

JMIR Med Inform 2020 Jul 20;8(7):e15880. Epub 2020 Jul 20.

State University of New York at Buffalo, Buffalo, NY, United States.

Background: The health care industry has more insider breaches than any other industry. Soon-to-be graduates are the trusted insiders of tomorrow, and their knowledge can be used to compromise organizational security systems.

Objective: The objective of this paper was to identify the role that monetary incentives play in violating the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act's (HIPAA) regulations and privacy laws by the next generation of employees. The research model was developed using the economics of crime literature and rational choice theory. The primary research question was whether higher perceptions of being apprehended for violating HIPAA regulations were related to higher requirements for monetary incentives.

Methods: Five scenarios were developed to determine if monetary incentives could be used to influence subjects to illegally obtain health care information and to release that information to individuals and media outlets. The subjects were also asked about the probability of getting caught for violating HIPAA laws. Correlation analysis was used to determine whether higher perceptions of being apprehended for violating HIPAA regulations were related to higher requirements for monetary incentives.

Results: Many of the subjects believed there was a high probability of being caught. Nevertheless, many of them could be incentivized to violate HIPAA laws. In the nursing scenario, 45.9% (240/523) of the participants indicated that there is a price, ranging from US $1000 to over US $10 million, that is acceptable for violating HIPAA laws. In the doctors' scenario, 35.4% (185/523) of the participants indicated that there is a price, ranging from US $1000 to over US $10 million, for violating HIPAA laws. In the insurance agent scenario, 45.1% (236/523) of the participants indicated that there is a price, ranging from US $1000 to over US $10 million, for violating HIPAA laws. When a personal context is involved, the percentages substantially increase. In the scenario where an experimental treatment for the subject's mother is needed, which is not covered by insurance, 78.4% (410/523) of the participants would accept US $100,000 from a media outlet for the medical records of a politician. In the scenario where US $50,000 is needed to obtain medical records about a famous reality star to help a friend in need of emergency medical transportation, 64.6% (338/523) of the participants would accept the money.

Conclusions: A key finding of this study is that individuals perceiving a high probability of being caught are less likely to release private information. However, when the personal context involves a friend or family member, such as a mother, they will probably succumb to the incentive, regardless of the probability of being caught. The key to reducing noncompliance will be to implement organizational procedures and constantly monitor and develop educational and training programs to encourage HIPAA compliance.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.2196/15880DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7399953PMC
July 2020

Can online social support be detrimental in stigmatized chronic diseases? A quadratic model of the effects of informational and emotional support on self-care behavior of HIV patients.

J Am Med Inform Assoc 2018 08;25(8):931-944

Department of Management Science and Systems, State University of New York at Buffalo, Buffalo, NY 14260-4000, USA.

Objective: We studied the impact of online social support on patient self-care behavior in an online health community for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) patients. We conceptualized emotional and informational support provided by community members into nuanced sub-dimensions. We explored how the direct and interaction effects of these sub-dimensions impact the self-care behavior of a support seeker.

Methods: We used data from 330 255 posts in 30 050 threads from POZ, an online health community for HIV patients. Our key variables-self-care behaviori, objective informationj, experiential supportj, and emotional tonej-were operationalized using linguistic analysis with self-generated dictionaries and Python libraries. We tested our hypotheses using Tobit regression.

Results: Out of 6 null hypotheses, 5 were rejected. Objective information and emotional tone had an inverted-U relationship with self-care behavior. Experiential information and community involvement were positively related to self-care behavior. Community involvement amplified the inverted-U relationship between emotional tone and self-care behavior. No significant interaction effect was found between experiential support and objective information.

Conclusions: Beyond a threshold, both informational and emotional online social support had a deleterious impact on self-care behavior of HIV patients. Our results suggested that caution should be exercised in the use of online health community interventions for HIV patients, and perhaps patients with other stigmatized chronic diseases.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/jamia/ocy012DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7646863PMC
August 2018

Phosphorylated Codonopsis pilosula polysaccharide could inhibit the virulence of duck hepatitis A virus compared with Codonopsis pilosula polysaccharide.

Int J Biol Macromol 2017 Jan 3;94(Pt A):28-35. Epub 2016 Oct 3.

Institute of Traditional Chinese Veterinary Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, Nanjing Agricultural University, Nanjing 210095, PR China. Electronic address:

To screen effective anti-duck hepatitis A virus (DHAV) drugs, we applied STMP-STPP method to prepare phosphorylated Codonopsis pilosula polysaccharide (pCPPS), the phosphorylation-modified product of Codonopsis pilosula polysaccharide (CPPS). The IR spectrum and field emission scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM) were subsequently used to analyze the structure of pCPPS. Several tests were conducted to compare the anti-DHAV activities of CPPS and pCPPS. The MTT method was used to compare the effect of the drugs on DHAV-infected duck embryonic hepatocytes (DEHs), and the Reed-Muench assay was employed to observe changes in the virulence of DHAV. We also applied real-time PCR to examine the relationship between virus replication and the expression of IFN-β. The results indicated that CPPS could not inhibit the replication of DHAV. In contrast, pCPPS increased the virus TCID, inhibited viral replication and, accordingly, increased the survival rate of DEHs infected with DHAV. Because DHAV induced the expression of IFN-β, and the IFN-β expression level was positively associated with the number of DHAV, the reduction of IFN-β expression levels after pCPPS treatment demonstrated a decrease in the number of virus particles. These results indicated that pCPPS, which reduces the number of DHAV, was more effective than CPPS in anti-DHAV activity.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ijbiomac.2016.10.002DOI Listing
January 2017
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