Publications by authors named "Xueyi Sui"

5 Publications

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Ethnobotany and diversity of medicinal plants used by the Buyi in eastern Yunnan, China.

Plant Divers 2020 Dec 7;42(6):401-414. Epub 2020 Oct 7.

College of Life and Environmental Sciences, Minzu University of China, Beijing, 100081, China.

The Buyi are a socio-linguistic group in Yunnan Province of southwest China that have a long history of using medicinal plants as part of their indigenous medical system. Given the limited written documentation of the Buyi indigenous medical system, the objective of this paper is to document the medicinal plants of the Buyi and associated traditional knowledge and transmission. Field research was conducted in four villages in Lubuge Township of Luoping County in Yunnan Province using ethnobotanical methodologies including participatory observation, semi-structured interviews, key informant interviews, and focus group discussions to elicit information on medicinal plants. In total, 120 informants (including 15 key informants who are healers) were interviewed. This study found that a total of 121 medicinal plant species belonging to 64 families are used by the Buyi including by local healers to treat different diseases. Among the medicinal plants recorded in this study, 56 species (46%) have not previously been documented in the scientific literature as having medicinal value, highlighting the pressing need for ethnobotanical documentation in indigenous communities. The most frequently used medicinal part was the leaf (24.9% of documented plants), and the most common preparation method was decoction (62.8% of medicinal). Medicinal plants were mainly used to treat rheumatism (12.4% of plants), trauma and injuries (9.6%). The documented plants are also used for other non-medicinal purposes including food, fodder, fencing, and ornamental. In addition, 35 of the medicinal plants are considered poisonous and are used by local Buyi healers for medicine. The traditional Buyi beliefs and practices associated with the documented medicinal plants likely contributes to their conservation in the environments and around Buyi communities. This study further highlights that ethnomedicinal knowledge of the Buyi is at risk of disappearing due to increased introduction and use of modern medicine in Buyi communities, livelihood changes, rapid modernization, and urbanization. Research, policy, and community programs are urgently needed to conserve the biocultural diversity associated with the Buyi medical system including ethnobotanical knowledge towards supporting both environmental and human wellbeing.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.pld.2020.09.004DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7936110PMC
December 2020

Development of a nornicotine-reduced flue-cured tobacco line via EMS mutagenesis of nicotine N-demethylase genes.

Plant Signal Behav 2020 3;15(2):1710053. Epub 2020 Jan 3.

Yunnan Academy of Tobacco Agricultural Sciences, Kunming, Yunnan, China.

Substantial progress had been made in reducing nornicotine accumulation in burley tobacco, as nornicotine is a precursor of the carcinogen N-nitrosonornicotine (NNN). Three members of the family encoding nicotine N-demethylase (NND) have been reported to be responsible for the majority of nicotine demethylation that forms nornicotine in burley tobacco. We had obtained a nonsense mutant of each NND member in flue-cured tobacco from an ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS)-mutagenized population. In this study, we developed dCAPS markers for each nonsense mutation. Using marker-assisted selection, NND mutants were crossed with each other to generate a triple mutant GP449. In line with previous reports, the triple knockout caused significantly decreased levels of nornicotine and NNN in flue-cured tobacco. With the decreased nornicotine, the nicotine level was expected to accumulate. However, the nicotine level in GP449 was significantly decreased to 72.80% of wild type. Realtime RT-PCR analysis showed that the nicotine reduction was correlated with inhibited expression of nicotine biosynthetic pathway genes. The triple mutant and dCAPS markers can be utilized to develop new flue-cured tobacco varieties with lower levels of nornicotine and NNN.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/15592324.2019.1710053DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7053972PMC
January 2021

Ethylene response factor NtERF91 positively regulates alkaloid accumulations in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.).

Biochem Biophys Res Commun 2019 09 18;517(1):164-171. Epub 2019 Jul 18.

Tobacco Breeding and Biotechnology Research Center, Yunnan Academy of Tobacco Agricultural Sciences, Kunming, Yunnan, 650201, China. Electronic address:

Tobacco alkaloid metabolism is regulated by various transcription factors (TFs). Here, we have characterized a non-NIC2 locus gene, Ethylene Response Factor 91 (ERF91), function in regulation of alkaloid accumulation in tobacco. NtERF91 was preferentially expressed in roots and induced by jasmonic acid. Additionally, NtERF91 was able to in vitro bind to the NtPMT2 and NtQPT2 promoters via directly targeting the GCC-box elements and transactivate NtQPT2 gene expression. Ectopic overexpression of NtERF91 not only increased the expression of most nicotine biosynthetic genes, but also altered alkaloid accumulation profile, resulting in dramatically anatabine accumulation. We conclude that NtERF91 plays an overlapped but distinct role in regulating tobacco alkaloid accumulations.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bbrc.2019.07.037DOI Listing
September 2019

Cross-family transcription factor interaction between MYC2 and GBFs modulates terpenoid indole alkaloid biosynthesis.

J Exp Bot 2018 08;69(18):4267-4281

Department of Plant and Soil Sciences and Kentucky Tobacco Research and Development Center, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY, USA.

Biosynthesis of medicinally valuable terpenoid indole alkaloids (TIAs) in Catharanthus roseus is regulated by transcriptional activators such as the basic helix-loop-helix factor CrMYC2. However, the transactivation effects are often buffered by repressors, such as the bZIP factors CrGBF1 and CrGBF2, possibly to fine-tune the accumulation of cytotoxic TIAs. Questions remain as to whether and how these factors interact to modulate TIA production. We demonstrated that overexpression of CrMYC2 induces CrGBF expression and results in reduced alkaloid accumulation in C. roseus hairy roots. We found that CrGBF1 and CrGBF2 form homo- and heterodimers to repress the transcriptional activities of key TIA pathway gene promoters. We showed that CrGBFs dimerize with CrMYC2, and CrGBF1 binds to the same cis-elements (T/G-box) as CrMYC2 in the target gene promoters. Our findings suggest that CrGBFs antagonize CrMYC2 transactivation possibly by competitive binding to the T/G-box in the target promoters and/or protein-protein interaction that forms a non-DNA binding complex that prevents CrMYC2 from binding to its target promoters. Homo- and heterodimer formation allows fine-tuning of the amplitude of TIA gene expression. Our findings reveal a previously undescribed regulatory mechanism that governs the TIA pathway genes to balance metabolic flux for TIA production in C. roseus.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/jxb/ery229DOI Listing
August 2018

A differentially regulated AP2/ERF transcription factor gene cluster acts downstream of a MAP kinase cascade to modulate terpenoid indole alkaloid biosynthesis in Catharanthus roseus.

New Phytol 2017 Feb 1;213(3):1107-1123. Epub 2016 Nov 1.

Department of Plant and Soil Sciences and Kentucky Tobacco Research Development Center, University of Kentucky, 1401 University Drive, Lexington, KY, 40546, USA.

Catharanthus roseus produces bioactive terpenoid indole alkaloids (TIAs), including the chemotherapeutics, vincristine and vinblastine. Transcriptional regulation of TIA biosynthesis is not fully understood. The jasmonic acid (JA)-responsive AP2/ERF transcription factor (TF), ORCA3, and its regulator, CrMYC2, play key roles in TIA biosynthesis. ORCA3 forms a physical cluster with two uncharacterized AP2/ERFs, ORCA4 and 5. Here, we report that (1) the ORCA gene cluster is differentially regulated; (2) ORCA4, while overlapping functionally with ORCA3, modulates an additional set of TIA genes. Unlike ORCA3, ORCA4 overexpression resulted in dramatic increase of TIA accumulation in C. roseus hairy roots. In addition, CrMYC2 is capable of activating ORCA3 and co-regulating TIA pathway genes concomitantly with ORCA3. The ORCA gene cluster and CrMYC2 act downstream of a MAP kinase cascade that includes a previously uncharacterized MAP kinase kinase, CrMAPKK1. Overexpression of CrMAPKK1 in C. roseus hairy roots upregulated TIA pathways genes and increased TIA accumulation. This work provides detailed characterization of a TF gene cluster and advances our understanding of the transcriptional and post-translational regulatory mechanisms that govern TIA biosynthesis in C. roseus.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/nph.14252DOI Listing
February 2017