Publications by authors named "Xuefeng Liu"

286 Publications

Light-Trapping SERS Substrate with Regular Bioinspired Arrays for Detecting Trace Dyes.

ACS Appl Mater Interfaces 2021 Feb 24. Epub 2021 Feb 24.

The Key Laboratory of Food Colloids and Biotechnology, Ministry of Education, School of Chemical and Material Engineering, Jiangnan University, Wuxi 214122, China.

Recently, few studies have focused on the light-trapping surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) substrate combined with Si micropyramids and Ag (or Au). However, the Si micropyramids possess no ordered period, which not only affects the repeatability of the SERS signal but also affects the theoretical exploration. Here, the ordered micropyramids with strong light-trapping capability were fabricated by utilizing unconventional nanosphere lithography and anisotropy wet etching technique. Then, the Ag nanobowls were assembled on the ordered micropyramids to form the SERS substrate with bioinspired compound-eyes structure by utilizing the liquid-solid interface self-assembly and transfer technique. Especially, the evidence for the contribution of antireflective Si micropyramids to Raman enhancement was first presented. For this bioinspired SERS substrate, the lowest concentration of R6G that can be detected is 10 M with the level of a single molecule, and the relative standard deviation (RSD) is 3.68%. Meanwhile, the quantitative analysis and qualitative analysis can be realized. Especially, simultaneous trace detection of four common dyes (R6G, CV, MG, and MB) in food can be realized, suggesting that this SERS substrate will have a good application prospect in the field of optical sensors.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/acsami.1c00702DOI Listing
February 2021

A survey on incorporating domain knowledge into deep learning for medical image analysis.

Med Image Anal 2021 Apr 30;69:101985. Epub 2021 Jan 30.

School of Computer Science, University of Technology Sydney, 15 Broadway, Ultimo NSW 2007, Australia.

Although deep learning models like CNNs have achieved great success in medical image analysis, the small size of medical datasets remains a major bottleneck in this area. To address this problem, researchers have started looking for external information beyond current available medical datasets. Traditional approaches generally leverage the information from natural images via transfer learning. More recent works utilize the domain knowledge from medical doctors, to create networks that resemble how medical doctors are trained, mimic their diagnostic patterns, or focus on the features or areas they pay particular attention to. In this survey, we summarize the current progress on integrating medical domain knowledge into deep learning models for various tasks, such as disease diagnosis, lesion, organ and abnormality detection, lesion and organ segmentation. For each task, we systematically categorize different kinds of medical domain knowledge that have been utilized and their corresponding integrating methods. We also provide current challenges and directions for future research.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.media.2021.101985DOI Listing
April 2021

Accurate Analysis of Tricarboxylic Acid Cycle Metabolites and Anion Components in Hemocytes by IC-CD/ESI-MS for Quantifying Insecticide Impairment on Cellular Immunity in .

J Agric Food Chem 2021 Feb 3;69(6):1984-1993. Epub 2021 Feb 3.

Shanghai Key Lab of Chemical Biology, School of Pharmacy, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai 200237, China.

Insecticides are more broadly known to affect insect cellular immunity, but the components in hemocytes and their response to insecticide stress are still unknown. In this paper, a method based on trifluoroacetic acid extraction, followed by IC-CD/ESI-MS analysis, was developed to simultaneously determine tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle metabolites and anion components in hemocytes from larvae. Validation gave excellent selectivity, recovery (88.7-107.6%), linear correlation ( > 0.9961), precision (<3.89%), LOD (0.002-0.006 mg/L), LOQ (0.006-0.020 mg/L), and a short chromatographic run. The method was verified by administration of 4-((3-chloro-4-fluorophenyl)amino)-7-methoxyquinazolin-6-yl 3-(1,3-dioxoiso-indolin-2-yl) propanoate (QDP) or emamectin benzoate (EMB) to hemocytes in vitro and larvae in vivo. TCA metabolites including citrate, α-ketoglutarate, fumarate, malate, and oxaloacetate, and anions including acetate, oxalate, chloride, carbonate, and sulfate were identified and clearly separated. QDP and EMB showed a biphasic dose effect on TCA metabolites, and the contrary hormesis paralleled the different actions of QDP and EMB. The inhibition or improvement of cellular immunity depended on the QDP concentration. In conclusion, a highly sensitive, reliable, and robust method was developed, enabling the monitoring of hemocyte immunity by the quantification of TCA metabolites and anion components in minute hemocyte samples.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/acs.jafc.0c07481DOI Listing
February 2021

A novel missense mutation in the gene encoding major intrinsic protein (MIP) in a Giant panda with unilateral cataract formation.

BMC Genomics 2021 Feb 2;22(1):100. Epub 2021 Feb 2.

, Chengdu Zoo, Chengdu, China.

Background: Cataracts are defects of the lens that cause progressive visual impairment and ultimately blindness in many vertebrate species. Most cataracts are age-related, but up to one third have an underlying genetic cause. Cataracts are common in captive zoo animals, but it is often unclear whether these are congenital or acquired (age-related) lesions.

Results: Here we used a functional candidate gene screening approach to identify mutations associated with cataracts in a captive giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca). We screened 11 genes often associated with human cataracts and identified a novel missense mutation (c.686G > A) in the MIP gene encoding major intrinsic protein. This is expressed in the lens and normally accumulates in the plasma membrane of lens fiber cells, where it plays an important role in fluid transport and cell adhesion. The mutation causes the replacement of serine with asparagine (p.S229N) in the C-terminal tail of the protein, and modeling predicts that the mutation induces conformational changes that may interfere with lens permeability and cell-cell interactions.

Conclusion: The c.686G > A mutation was found in a captive giant panda with a unilateral cataract but not in 18 controls from diverse regions in China, suggesting it is most likely a genuine disease-associated mutation rather than a single-nucleotide polymorphism. The mutation could therefore serve as a new genetic marker to predict the risk of congenital cataracts in captive giant pandas.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12864-021-07386-8DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7856726PMC
February 2021

Author correction: Quiescence and attenuated DNA damage response promote survival of esophageal cancer stem cells.

J Cell Biochem 2021 Feb 28;122(2):301-302. Epub 2020 Oct 28.

State Key Laboratory of Molecular Oncology, Cancer Institute and Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing, China.

View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jcb.29864DOI Listing
February 2021

Why wild giant pandas frequently roll in horse manure.

Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 2020 12 7;117(51):32493-32498. Epub 2020 Dec 7.

Key Laboratory of Animal Ecology and Conservation Biology, Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 100101 Beijing, China;

Attraction to feces in wild mammalian species is extremely rare. Here we introduce the horse manure rolling (HMR) behavior of wild giant pandas (). Pandas not only frequently sniffed and wallowed in fresh horse manure, but also actively rubbed the fecal matter all over their bodies. The frequency of HMR events was highly correlated with an ambient temperature lower than 15 °C. BCP/BCPO (beta-caryophyllene/caryophyllene oxide) in fresh horse manure was found to drive HMR behavior and attenuated the cold sensitivity of mice by directly targeting and inhibiting transient receptor potential melastatin 8 (TRPM8), an archetypical cold-activated ion channel of mammals. Therefore, horse manure containing BCP/BCPO likely bestows the wild giant pandas with cold tolerance at low ambient temperatures. Together, our study described an unusual behavior, identified BCP/BCPO as chemical inhibitors of TRPM8 ion channel, and provided a plausible chemistry-auxiliary mechanism, in which animals might actively seek and utilize potential chemical resources from their habitat for temperature acclimatization.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1073/pnas.2004640117DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7768701PMC
December 2020

Author Correction: Multi-region sequencing unveils novel actionable targets and spatial heterogeneity in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma.

Nat Commun 2020 Nov 12;11(1):5870. Epub 2020 Nov 12.

Shenzhen Peking University-The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology (PKU-HKUST) Medical Center, Peking University Shenzhen Hospital, 518035, Shenzhen, PR China.

An amendment to this paper has been published and can be accessed via a link at the top of the paper.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41467-020-19641-9DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7665205PMC
November 2020

Retrieving similar substructures on 3D neuron reconstructions.

Brain Inform 2020 Nov 4;7(1):14. Epub 2020 Nov 4.

Faculty of Information Technology, Beijing University of Technology, Beijing, China.

Since manual tracing is time consuming and the performance of automatic tracing is unstable, it is still a challenging task to generate accurate neuron reconstruction efficiently and effectively. One strategy is generating a reconstruction automatically and then amending its inaccurate parts manually. Aiming at finding inaccurate substructures efficiently, we propose a pipeline to retrieve similar substructures on one or more neuron reconstructions, which are very similar to a marked problematic substructure. The pipeline consists of four steps: getting a marked substructure, constructing a query substructure, generating candidate substructures and retrieving most similar substructures. The retrieval procedure was tested on 163 gold standard reconstructions provided by the BigNeuron project and a reconstruction of a mouse's large neuron. Experimental results showed that the implementation of the proposed methods is very efficient and all retrieved substructures are very similar to the marked one in numbers of nodes and branches, and degree of curvature.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s40708-020-00117-xDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7642183PMC
November 2020

Burden of Neurological Disorders Across the US From 1990-2017: A Global Burden of Disease Study.

JAMA Neurol 2021 Feb;78(2):165-176

Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation, University of Washington, Seattle.

Importance: Accurate and up-to-date estimates on incidence, prevalence, mortality, and disability-adjusted life-years (burden) of neurological disorders are the backbone of evidence-based health care planning and resource allocation for these disorders. It appears that no such estimates have been reported at the state level for the US.

Objective: To present burden estimates of major neurological disorders in the US states by age and sex from 1990 to 2017.

Design, Setting, And Participants: This is a systematic analysis of the Global Burden of Disease (GBD) 2017 study. Data on incidence, prevalence, mortality, and disability-adjusted life-years (DALYs) of major neurological disorders were derived from the GBD 2017 study of the 48 contiguous US states, Alaska, and Hawaii. Fourteen major neurological disorders were analyzed: stroke, Alzheimer disease and other dementias, Parkinson disease, epilepsy, multiple sclerosis, motor neuron disease, migraine, tension-type headache, traumatic brain injury, spinal cord injuries, brain and other nervous system cancers, meningitis, encephalitis, and tetanus.

Exposures: Any of the 14 listed neurological diseases.

Main Outcome And Measure: Absolute numbers in detail by age and sex and age-standardized rates (with 95% uncertainty intervals) were calculated.

Results: The 3 most burdensome neurological disorders in the US in terms of absolute number of DALYs were stroke (3.58 [95% uncertainty interval [UI], 3.25-3.92] million DALYs), Alzheimer disease and other dementias (2.55 [95% UI, 2.43-2.68] million DALYs), and migraine (2.40 [95% UI, 1.53-3.44] million DALYs). The burden of almost all neurological disorders (in terms of absolute number of incident, prevalent, and fatal cases, as well as DALYs) increased from 1990 to 2017, largely because of the aging of the population. Exceptions for this trend included traumatic brain injury incidence (-29.1% [95% UI, -32.4% to -25.8%]); spinal cord injury prevalence (-38.5% [95% UI, -43.1% to -34.0%]); meningitis prevalence (-44.8% [95% UI, -47.3% to -42.3%]), deaths (-64.4% [95% UI, -67.7% to -50.3%]), and DALYs (-66.9% [95% UI, -70.1% to -55.9%]); and encephalitis DALYs (-25.8% [95% UI, -30.7% to -5.8%]). The different metrics of age-standardized rates varied between the US states from a 1.2-fold difference for tension-type headache to 7.5-fold for tetanus; southeastern states and Arkansas had a relatively higher burden for stroke, while northern states had a relatively higher burden of multiple sclerosis and eastern states had higher rates of Parkinson disease, idiopathic epilepsy, migraine and tension-type headache, and meningitis, encephalitis, and tetanus.

Conclusions And Relevance: There is a large and increasing burden of noncommunicable neurological disorders in the US, with up to a 5-fold variation in the burden of and trends in particular neurological disorders across the US states. The information reported in this article can be used by health care professionals and policy makers at the national and state levels to advance their health care planning and resource allocation to prevent and reduce the burden of neurological disorders.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1001/jamaneurol.2020.4152DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7607495PMC
February 2021

Imbalance of laminar-specific excitatory and inhibitory circuits of the orbitofrontal cortex in autism.

Mol Autism 2020 10 20;11(1):83. Epub 2020 Oct 20.

Human Systems Neuroscience Laboratory, Department of Health Sciences, Boston University, 635 Commonwealth Ave., Room 401D, Boston, MA, 02215, USA.

Background: The human orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) is involved in assessing the emotional significance of events and stimuli, emotion-based learning, allocation of attentional resources, and social cognition. Little is known about the structure, connectivity and excitatory/inhibitory circuit interactions underlying these diverse functions in human OFC, as well as how the circuit is disrupted in individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD).

Methods: We used post-mortem brain tissue from neurotypical adults and individuals with ASD. We examined the morphology and distribution of myelinated axons across cortical layers in OFC, at the single axon level, as a proxy of excitatory pathways. In the same regions, we also examined the laminar distribution of all neurons and neurochemically- and functionally-distinct inhibitory neurons that express the calcium-binding proteins parvalbumin (PV), calbindin (CB), and calretinin (CR).

Results: We found that the density of myelinated axons increased consistently towards layer 6, while the average axon diameter did not change significantly across layers in both groups. However, both the density and diameter of myelinated axons were significantly lower in the ASD group compared with the Control group. The distribution pattern and density of the three major types of inhibitory neurons was comparable between groups, but there was a significant reduction in the density of excitatory neurons across OFC layers in ASD.

Limitations: This study is limited by the availability of human post-mortem tissue optimally processed for high-resolution microscopy and immunolabeling, especially from individuals with ASD.

Conclusions: The balance between excitation and inhibition in OFC is at the core of its function, assessing and integrating emotional and social cues with internal states and external inputs. Our preliminary results provide evidence for laminar-specific changes in the ratio of excitation/inhibition in OFC of adults with ASD, with an overall weakening and likely disorganization of excitatory signals and a relative strengthening of local inhibition. These changes likely underlie pathology of major OFC communications with limbic or other cortices and the amygdala in individuals with ASD, and may provide the anatomic basis for disrupted transmission of signals for social interactions and emotions in autism.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13229-020-00390-xDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7574354PMC
October 2020

Identification of a prognostic gene signature based on an immunogenomic landscape analysis of bladder cancer.

J Cell Mol Med 2020 Nov 13;24(22):13370-13382. Epub 2020 Oct 13.

Department of Urology, Zhongnan Hospital of Wuhan University, Wuhan, China.

Cancer immune plays a critical role in cancer progression. Tumour immunology and immunotherapy are one of the exciting areas in bladder cancer research. In this study, we aimed to develop an immune-related gene signature to improve the prognostic prediction of bladder cancer. Firstly, we identified 392 differentially expressed immune-related genes (IRGs) based on TCGA and ImmPort databases. Functional enrichment analysis revealed that these genes were enriched in inflammatory and immune-related pathways, including in 'regulation of signaling receptor activity', 'cytokine-cytokine receptor interaction' and 'GPCR ligand binding'. Then, we separated all samples in TCGA data set into the training cohort and the testing cohort in a ratio of 3:1 randomly. Data set GSE13507 was set as the validation cohort. We constructed a prognostic six-IRG signature with LASSO Cox regression in the training cohort, including AHNAK, OAS1, APOBEC3H, SCG2, CTSE and KIR2DS4. Six IRGs reflected the microenvironment of bladder cancer, especially immune cell infiltration. The prognostic value of six-IRG signature was further validated in the testing cohort and the validation cohort. The results of multivariable Cox regression and subgroup analysis revealed that six-IRG signature was a clinically independent prognostic factor for bladder cancer patients. Further, we constructed a nomogram based on six-IRG signature and other clinicopathological risk factors, and it performed well in predict patients' survival. Finally, we found six-IRG signature showed significant difference in different molecular subtypes of bladder cancer. In conclusions, our research provided a novel immune-related gene signature to estimate prognosis for patients' survival with bladder cancer.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/jcmm.15960DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7701570PMC
November 2020

Role of Ubiquitination in PTEN Cellular Homeostasis and Its Implications in GB Drug Resistance.

Front Oncol 2020 2;10:1569. Epub 2020 Sep 2.

School of Life Sciences, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing, China.

Glioblastoma (GB) is the most common and aggressive brain malignancy, characterized by heterogeneity and drug resistance. PTEN, a crucial tumor suppressor, exhibits phosphatase-dependent (PI3K-AKT-mTOR pathway)/independent (nucleus stability) activities to maintain the homeostatic regulation of numerous physiological processes. Premature and absolute loss of PTEN activity usually tends to cellular senescence. However, monoallelic loss of PTEN is frequently observed at tumor inception, and absolute loss of PTEN activity also occurs at the late stage of gliomagenesis. Consequently, aberrant PTEN homeostasis, mainly regulated at the post-translational level, renders cells susceptible to tumorigenesis and drug resistance. Ubiquitination-mediated degradation or deregulated intracellular localization of PTEN hijacks cell growth rheostat control for neoplastic remodeling. Functional inactivation of PTEN mediated by the overexpression of ubiquitin ligases (E3s) renders GB cells adaptive to PTEN loss, which confers resistance to EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors and immunotherapies. In this review, we discuss how glioma cells develop oncogenic addiction to the E3s-PTEN axis, promoting their growth and proliferation. Antitumor strategies involving PTEN-targeting E3 ligase inhibitors can restore the tumor-suppressive environment. E3 inhibitors collectively reactivate PTEN and may represent next-generation treatment against deadly malignancies such as GB.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fonc.2020.01569DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7492558PMC
September 2020

Prenatal diagnosis and genetic counseling of complete uniparental isodisomy of chromosome 3 with no phenotypic abnormalities.

Taiwan J Obstet Gynecol 2020 Sep;59(5):788-789

Department of Child Health Care, Shiyan Maternal and Child Health Hospital, Shiyan, Hubei, China. Electronic address:

View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.tjog.2020.07.033DOI Listing
September 2020

Visualization of ultrasonic wave field by stroboscopic polarization selective imaging.

Opt Express 2020 Aug;28(18):27096-27106

A stroboscopic method based on polarization selective imaging is proposed for dynamic visualization of ultrasonic waves propagating in a transparent medium. Multiple independent polarization parametric images were obtained, which enabled quantitative evaluation of the distribution of the ultrasonic pressure in quartz. In addition to the detection of optical phase differences δ in conventional photo-elastic techniques, the azimuthal angle φ and the Stokes parameter S of the polarized light are found to be highly sensitive to the wave-induced refraction index distribution, opening a new window on ultrasonic field visualization.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1364/OE.400355DOI Listing
August 2020

Fungicidal Effect of Pyraclostrobin against in Relation to Its Crystal Structure.

J Agric Food Chem 2020 Sep 9;68(39):10975-10983. Epub 2020 Sep 9.

Shanghai Key Lab of Chemical Biology, School of Pharmacy, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai 200237, PR China.

Pyraclostrobin (PYR) is a commonly used strobilurin fungicide, which inhibits mitochondrial respiration at the ubiquinol oxidation center site of the cytochrome bc1 complex. Little information is available regarding the crystal structure of PYR on its fungicidal effect. In this study, the crystal structures of eight PYRs (PYR-A to H) from different sources are determined by using high-resolution X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD) and model construction with the Pawley refinement module. The effects of PYRs on mycelium growth, the kinetics of mycelial growth, conidial germination, and tube elongation of conidia of from tomato are compared. The level of organic acids in the mitochondrial tricarboxylic acid cycle of PYR-treated is analyzed. The results show that PYR-A to PYR-H have their own unique character of XRPD patterns, but the crystal morphology of eight PYRs presents in the triclinic crystal system and space group 1̅. PYR-D with the eclipsed conformation and rational edge angles α (72.599°) and β (98.612°) in the crystal cell shows the highest inhibitory effect against mycelium growth with EC as 3.383 μg mL, the best time-dependent effects on the mycelium growth kinetics, and the strongest inhibition on tube elongation of conidia, whereas PYR-E with anticonformation is the worst. Moreover, a significant accumulation of fumarate, malate, and oxalate in the PYR-D-treated mycelium is observed. These findings reinforce the need for a definite crystal structure of PYR to limit usage and mitigate future selection pressure for gray mold management.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/acs.jafc.0c04908DOI Listing
September 2020

Estimating global injuries morbidity and mortality: methods and data used in the Global Burden of Disease 2017 study.

Authors:
Spencer L James Chris D Castle Zachary V Dingels Jack T Fox Erin B Hamilton Zichen Liu Nicholas L S Roberts Dillon O Sylte Gregory J Bertolacci Matthew Cunningham Nathaniel J Henry Kate E LeGrand Ahmed Abdelalim Ibrahim Abdollahpour Rizwan Suliankatchi Abdulkader Aidin Abedi Kedir Hussein Abegaz Akine Eshete Abosetugn Abdelrahman I Abushouk Oladimeji M Adebayo Jose C Adsuar Shailesh M Advani Marcela Agudelo-Botero Tauseef Ahmad Muktar Beshir Ahmed Rushdia Ahmed Miloud Taki Eddine Aichour Fares Alahdab Fahad Mashhour Alanezi Niguse Meles Alema Biresaw Wassihun Alemu Suliman A Alghnam Beriwan Abdulqadir Ali Saqib Ali Cyrus Alinia Vahid Alipour Syed Mohamed Aljunid Amir Almasi-Hashiani Nihad A Almasri Khalid Altirkawi Yasser Sami Abdeldayem Amer Catalina Liliana Andrei Alireza Ansari-Moghaddam Carl Abelardo T Antonio Davood Anvari Seth Christopher Yaw Appiah Jalal Arabloo Morteza Arab-Zozani Zohreh Arefi Olatunde Aremu Filippo Ariani Amit Arora Malke Asaad Beatriz Paulina Ayala Quintanilla Getinet Ayano Martin Amogre Ayanore Ghasem Azarian Alaa Badawi Ashish D Badiye Atif Amin Baig Mohan Bairwa Ahad Bakhtiari Arun Balachandran Maciej Banach Srikanta K Banerjee Palash Chandra Banik Amrit Banstola Suzanne Lyn Barker-Collo Till Winfried Bärnighausen Akbar Barzegar Mohsen Bayati Shahrzad Bazargan-Hejazi Neeraj Bedi Masoud Behzadifar Habte Belete Derrick A Bennett Isabela M Bensenor Kidanemaryam Berhe Akshaya Srikanth Bhagavathula Pankaj Bhardwaj Anusha Ganapati Bhat Krittika Bhattacharyya Zulfiqar A Bhutta Sadia Bibi Ali Bijani Archith Boloor Guilherme Borges Rohan Borschmann Antonio Maria Borzì Soufiane Boufous Dejana Braithwaite Nikolay Ivanovich Briko Traolach Brugha Shyam S Budhathoki Josip Car Rosario Cárdenas Félix Carvalho João Mauricio Castaldelli-Maia Carlos A Castañeda-Orjuela Giulio Castelpietra Ferrán Catalá-López Ester Cerin Joht S Chandan Jens Robert Chapman Vijay Kumar Chattu Soosanna Kumary Chattu Irini Chatziralli Neha Chaudhary Daniel Youngwhan Cho Jee-Young J Choi Mohiuddin Ahsanul Kabir Chowdhury Devasahayam J Christopher Dinh-Toi Chu Flavia M Cicuttini João M Coelho Vera M Costa Saad M A Dahlawi Ahmad Daryani Claudio Alberto Dávila-Cervantes Diego De Leo Feleke Mekonnen Demeke Gebre Teklemariam Demoz Desalegn Getnet Demsie Kebede Deribe Rupak Desai Mostafa Dianati Nasab Diana Dias da Silva Zahra Sadat Dibaji Forooshani Hoa Thi Do Kerrie E Doyle Tim Robert Driscoll Eleonora Dubljanin Bereket Duko Adema Arielle Wilder Eagan Demelash Abewa Elemineh Shaimaa I El-Jaafary Ziad El-Khatib Christian Lycke Ellingsen Maysaa El Sayed Zaki Sharareh Eskandarieh Oghenowede Eyawo Pawan Sirwan Faris Andre Faro Farshad Farzadfar Seyed-Mohammad Fereshtehnejad Eduarda Fernandes Pietro Ferrara Florian Fischer Morenike Oluwatoyin Folayan Artem Alekseevich Fomenkov Masoud Foroutan Joel Msafiri Francis Richard Charles Franklin Takeshi Fukumoto Biniyam Sahiledengle Geberemariyam Hadush Gebremariam Ketema Bizuwork Gebremedhin Leake G Gebremeskel Gebreamlak Gebremedhn Gebremeskel Berhe Gebremichael Getnet Azeze Gedefaw Birhanu Geta Agegnehu Bante Getenet Mansour Ghafourifard Farhad Ghamari Reza Ghanei Gheshlagh Asadollah Gholamian Syed Amir Gilani Tiffany K Gill Amir Hossein Goudarzian Alessandra C Goulart Ayman Grada Michal Grivna Rafael Alves Guimarães Yuming Guo Gaurav Gupta Juanita A Haagsma Brian James Hall Randah R Hamadeh Samer Hamidi Demelash Woldeyohannes Handiso Josep Maria Haro Amir Hasanzadeh Shoaib Hassan Soheil Hassanipour Hadi Hassankhani Hamid Yimam Hassen Rasmus Havmoeller Delia Hendrie Fatemeh Heydarpour Martha Híjar Hung Chak Ho Chi Linh Hoang Michael K Hole Ramesh Holla Naznin Hossain Mehdi Hosseinzadeh Sorin Hostiuc Guoqing Hu Segun Emmanuel Ibitoye Olayinka Stephen Ilesanmi Leeberk Raja Inbaraj Seyed Sina Naghibi Irvani M Mofizul Islam Sheikh Mohammed Shariful Islam Rebecca Q Ivers Mohammad Ali Jahani Mihajlo Jakovljevic Farzad Jalilian Sudha Jayaraman Achala Upendra Jayatilleke Ravi Prakash Jha Yetunde O John-Akinola Jost B Jonas Kelly M Jones Nitin Joseph Farahnaz Joukar Jacek Jerzy Jozwiak Suresh Banayya Jungari Mikk Jürisson Ali Kabir Amaha Kahsay Leila R Kalankesh Rohollah Kalhor Teshome Abegaz Kamil Tanuj Kanchan Neeti Kapoor Manoochehr Karami Amir Kasaeian Hagazi Gebremedhin Kassaye Taras Kavetskyy Gbenga A Kayode Peter Njenga Keiyoro Abraham Getachew Kelbore Yousef Saleh Khader Morteza Abdullatif Khafaie Nauman Khalid Ibrahim A Khalil Rovshan Khalilov Maseer Khan Ejaz Ahmad Khan Junaid Khan Tripti Khanna Salman Khazaei Habibolah Khazaie Roba Khundkar Daniel N Kiirithio Young-Eun Kim Yun Jin Kim Daniel Kim Sezer Kisa Adnan Kisa Hamidreza Komaki Shivakumar K M Kondlahalli Ali Koolivand Vladimir Andreevich Korshunov Ai Koyanagi Moritz U G Kraemer Kewal Krishan Barthelemy Kuate Defo Burcu Kucuk Bicer Nuworza Kugbey Nithin Kumar Manasi Kumar Vivek Kumar Narinder Kumar Girikumar Kumaresh Faris Hasan Lami Van C Lansingh Savita Lasrado Arman Latifi Paolo Lauriola Carlo La Vecchia Janet L Leasher Shaun Wen Huey Lee Shanshan Li Xuefeng Liu Alan D Lopez Paulo A Lotufo Ronan A Lyons Daiane Borges Machado Mohammed Madadin Muhammed Magdy Abd El Razek Narayan Bahadur Mahotra Marek Majdan Azeem Majeed Venkatesh Maled Deborah Carvalho Malta Navid Manafi Amir Manafi Ana-Laura Manda Narayana Manjunatha Fariborz Mansour-Ghanaei Mohammad Ali Mansournia Joemer C Maravilla Amanda J Mason-Jones Seyedeh Zahra Masoumi Benjamin Ballard Massenburg Pallab K Maulik Man Mohan Mehndiratta Zeleke Aschalew Melketsedik Peter T N Memiah Walter Mendoza Ritesh G Menezes Melkamu Merid Mengesha Tuomo J Meretoja Atte Meretoja Hayimro Edemealem Merie Tomislav Mestrovic Bartosz Miazgowski Tomasz Miazgowski Ted R Miller G K Mini Andreea Mirica Erkin M Mirrakhimov Mehdi Mirzaei-Alavijeh Prasanna Mithra Babak Moazen Masoud Moghadaszadeh Efat Mohamadi Yousef Mohammad Aso Mohammad Darwesh Abdollah Mohammadian-Hafshejani Reza Mohammadpourhodki Shafiu Mohammed Jemal Abdu Mohammed Farnam Mohebi Mohammad A Mohseni Bandpei Mariam Molokhia Lorenzo Monasta Yoshan Moodley Masoud Moradi Ghobad Moradi Maziar Moradi-Lakeh Rahmatollah Moradzadeh Lidia Morawska Ilais Moreno Velásquez Shane Douglas Morrison Tilahun Belete Mossie Atalay Goshu Muluneh Kamarul Imran Musa Ghulam Mustafa Mehdi Naderi Ahamarshan Jayaraman Nagarajan Gurudatta Naik Mukhammad David Naimzada Farid Najafi Vinay Nangia Bruno Ramos Nascimento Morteza Naserbakht Vinod Nayak Javad Nazari Duduzile Edith Ndwandwe Ionut Negoi Josephine W Ngunjiri Trang Huyen Nguyen Cuong Tat Nguyen Diep Ngoc Nguyen Huong Lan Thi Nguyen Rajan Nikbakhsh Dina Nur Anggraini Ningrum Chukwudi A Nnaji Richard Ofori-Asenso Felix Akpojene Ogbo Onome Bright Oghenetega In-Hwan Oh Andrew T Olagunju Tinuke O Olagunju Ahmed Omar Bali Obinna E Onwujekwe Heather M Orpana Erika Ota Nikita Otstavnov Stanislav S Otstavnov Mahesh P A Jagadish Rao Padubidri Smita Pakhale Keyvan Pakshir Songhomitra Panda-Jonas Eun-Kee Park Sangram Kishor Patel Ashish Pathak Sanghamitra Pati Kebreab Paulos Amy E Peden Veincent Christian Filipino Pepito Jeevan Pereira Michael R Phillips Roman V Polibin Suzanne Polinder Farshad Pourmalek Akram Pourshams Hossein Poustchi Swayam Prakash Dimas Ria Angga Pribadi Parul Puri Zahiruddin Quazi Syed Navid Rabiee Mohammad Rabiee Amir Radfar Anwar Rafay Ata Rafiee Alireza Rafiei Fakher Rahim Siavash Rahimi Muhammad Aziz Rahman Ali Rajabpour-Sanati Fatemeh Rajati Ivo Rakovac Sowmya J Rao Vahid Rashedi Prateek Rastogi Priya Rathi Salman Rawaf Lal Rawal Reza Rawassizadeh Vishnu Renjith Serge Resnikoff Aziz Rezapour Ana Isabel Ribeiro Jennifer Rickard Carlos Miguel Rios González Leonardo Roever Luca Ronfani Gholamreza Roshandel Basema Saddik Hamid Safarpour Mahdi Safdarian S Mohammad Sajadi Payman Salamati Marwa R Rashad Salem Hosni Salem Inbal Salz Abdallah M Samy Juan Sanabria Lidia Sanchez Riera Milena M Santric Milicevic Abdur Razzaque Sarker Arash Sarveazad Brijesh Sathian Monika Sawhney Mehdi Sayyah David C Schwebel Soraya Seedat Subramanian Senthilkumaran Seyedmojtaba Seyedmousavi Feng Sha Faramarz Shaahmadi Saeed Shahabi Masood Ali Shaikh Mehran Shams-Beyranvand Aziz Sheikh Mika Shigematsu Jae Il Shin Rahman Shiri Soraya Siabani Inga Dora Sigfusdottir Jasvinder A Singh Pankaj Kumar Singh Dhirendra Narain Sinha Amin Soheili Joan B Soriano Muluken Bekele Sorrie Ireneous N Soyiri Mark A Stokes Mu'awiyyah Babale Sufiyan Bryan L Sykes Rafael Tabarés-Seisdedos Karen M Tabb Biruk Wogayehu Taddele Yonatal Mesfin Tefera Arash Tehrani-Banihashemi Gebretsadkan Hintsa Tekulu Ayenew Kassie Tesema Tesema Berhe Etsay Tesfay Rekha Thapar Mariya Vladimirovna Titova Kenean Getaneh Tlaye Hamid Reza Tohidinik Roman Topor-Madry Khanh Bao Tran Bach Xuan Tran Jaya Prasad Tripathy Alexander C Tsai Aristidis Tsatsakis Lorainne Tudor Car Irfan Ullah Saif Ullah Bhaskaran Unnikrishnan Era Upadhyay Olalekan A Uthman Pascual R Valdez Tommi Juhani Vasankari Yousef Veisani Narayanaswamy Venketasubramanian Francesco S Violante Vasily Vlassov Yasir Waheed Yuan-Pang Wang Taweewat Wiangkham Haileab Fekadu Wolde Dawit Habte Woldeyes Temesgen Gebeyehu Wondmeneh Adam Belay Wondmieneh Ai-Min Wu Grant M A Wyper Rajaram Yadav Ali Yadollahpour Yuichiro Yano Sanni Yaya Vahid Yazdi-Feyzabadi Pengpeng Ye Paul Yip Engida Yisma Naohiro Yonemoto Seok-Jun Yoon Yoosik Youm Mustafa Z Younis Zabihollah Yousefi Chuanhua Yu Yong Yu Telma Zahirian Moghadam Zoubida Zaidi Sojib Bin Zaman Mohammad Zamani Hamed Zandian Fatemeh Zarei Zhi-Jiang Zhang Yunquan Zhang Arash Ziapour Sanjay Zodpey Rakhi Dandona Samath Dhamminda Dharmaratne Simon I Hay Ali H Mokdad David M Pigott Robert C Reiner Theo Vos

Inj Prev 2020 Oct 24;26(Supp 1):i125-i153. Epub 2020 Aug 24.

Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA.

Background: While there is a long history of measuring death and disability from injuries, modern research methods must account for the wide spectrum of disability that can occur in an injury, and must provide estimates with sufficient demographic, geographical and temporal detail to be useful for policy makers. The Global Burden of Disease (GBD) 2017 study used methods to provide highly detailed estimates of global injury burden that meet these criteria.

Methods: In this study, we report and discuss the methods used in GBD 2017 for injury morbidity and mortality burden estimation. In summary, these methods included estimating cause-specific mortality for every cause of injury, and then estimating incidence for every cause of injury. Non-fatal disability for each cause is then calculated based on the probabilities of suffering from different types of bodily injury experienced.

Results: GBD 2017 produced morbidity and mortality estimates for 38 causes of injury. Estimates were produced in terms of incidence, prevalence, years lived with disability, cause-specific mortality, years of life lost and disability-adjusted life-years for a 28-year period for 22 age groups, 195 countries and both sexes.

Conclusions: GBD 2017 demonstrated a complex and sophisticated series of analytical steps using the largest known database of morbidity and mortality data on injuries. GBD 2017 results should be used to help inform injury prevention policy making and resource allocation. We also identify important avenues for improving injury burden estimation in the future.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/injuryprev-2019-043531DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7571362PMC
October 2020

Effective in-situ reduction of Cr(VI) from leather wastewater by advanced reduction process based on CO with visible-light photocatalyst.

Chemosphere 2021 Jan 12;263:127898. Epub 2020 Aug 12.

State Key Laboratory of Urban Water Resource and Environment, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin, 150090, PR China. Electronic address:

Advanced reduction process (ARP) has drawn an increasing interest as a new manner for removing oxidative pollutants in water. In this paper, we demonstrate the possibility of in-situ reduction of Cr(VI) by CO produced from formate originally existing in leather wastewater by visible-light-driven ARP containing black TiO photocatalyst. The prepared black TiO with nanotube structure achieves remarkable enhanced the reduction rate of Cr(VI) as high as 96.2% (k = 0.0114 min) in the presence of formate, which is approximately 4.75 times than that of 56.3% (k = 0.0024 min) in the absence under 120 min visible-light irradiate at unadjusted pH. The results exhibit a distinct contrast with commercial TiO (P25). A series of control experiments are also performed, indicating that formate is able to convert the oxidative environment into a highly reductive one, and the formate concentration, black TiO dosage and pH may greatly impact on the Cr(VI) reduction rate. According to the electron spin resonance (ESR) measurement, CO radicals can be directly verified as dominate radical in this system. Moreover, this system appears to be attractive for creating photochemical systems where in-situ production of CO radicals may be realized by using formate. Then this in-situ ARP system will provide a new perspective for the Cr(VI) removing, which makes leather wastewater treatment much easier and more sustainable in the future.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.chemosphere.2020.127898DOI Listing
January 2021

CircHIPK3 Promotes Clear Cell Renal Cell Carcinoma (ccRCC) Cells Proliferation and Metastasis via Altering of miR-508-3p/CXCL13 Signal.

Onco Targets Ther 2020 25;13:6051-6062. Epub 2020 Jun 25.

Department of Urology, Shengjing Hospital of China Medical University, Shenyang, People's Republic of China.

Introduction: Accumulating evidence has demonstrated that circular RNAs (circRNAs) play a key role in the tumorigenesis of various types of cancers, including clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC).

Materials And Methods: Reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction was used to detect the expression of circRNA homeodomain interacting protein kinase 3 (circHIPK3) and microRNAs (miRNAs), including miR-508-3p. The clinical measurement of circHIPK3 was evaluated by Kaplan-Meier survival analysis and receiver operating characteristic analysis. Cell Counting Kit-8 and Transwell chamber assays were performed to determine the changes in the proliferative and metastatic ability of A498 and 786-O cells. C-X-C motif chemokine ligand 13 (CXCL13) protein expression was detected by Western blot analysis. The targeted binding effect between miR-508-3p and circHIPK3 or CXCL13 was confirmed by constructed luciferase and RNA immunoprecipitation (RIP) assays, respectively. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) assay was used to measure the subcellular localization of circHIPK3 and miR-508-3p.

Results: It was found that circHIPK3 was markedly upregulated in ccRCC tissue and cell lines, and circHIPK3-upregulation was closely correlated with poor clinicopathological features in patients with ccRCC. It was found that both miR-508-3p and circHIPK3 were localized in the cytoplasm of ccRCC cells. The up- and downregulation of circHIPK3 positively regulated ccRCC cell proliferation and metastasis, and this regulatory effect was reversed by miR-508-3p. Through luciferase and RIP assays, it was confirmed that circHIPK3 could interacted with miR-508-3p. Furthermore, it was revealed that CXCL13, which was negatively correlated with miR-508-3p, was upregulated in ccRCC. It was also shown that CXCL13 was a downstream target of miR-508-3p. miR-508-3p suppressed ccRCC cell proliferation and metastasis by targeting CXCL13. Lastly, it was demonstrated that circHIPK3 promoted CXCL13 to facilitate ccRCC cell proliferation and metastasis by decoying miR-508-3p.

Conclusion: In brief, the results of the present study showed that circHIPK3 promoted ccRCC cell proliferation and metastasis by altering miR-5083p/CXCL13 signaling. The present findings might provide a novel target for the molecular treatment of ccRCC.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/OTT.S251436DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7422843PMC
June 2020

BORA regulates cell proliferation and migration in bladder cancer.

Cancer Cell Int 2020 6;20:290. Epub 2020 Jul 6.

Department of Urology, Zhongnan Hospital of Wuhan University, Wuhan, China.

Background: Bladder cancer is having a gradually increasing incidence in China. Except for the traditional chemotherapy drugs, there are no emerging new drugs for almost 30 years in bladder cancer. New potential therapeutic targets and biomarkers are urgently needed.

Methods: BORA is the activator of kinase Aurora A and plays an important role in cell cycle progression. To investigate the function of BORA in BCa, we established knockdown and overexpression cell models for in vitro studies, xenograft and pulmonary metastasis mouse models for in vivo studies.

Results: Our results indicated that BORA was upregulated in human bladder cancer (BCa) compared to the normal bladder and paracancerous tissues at transcriptional and translational levels. We found that BORA was positively related to BCa cell proliferation. Furthermore, knockdown induced cell cycle arrest in G2/M phase while overexpression decreased the proportion of cells in G2/M, associated with PLK1-CDC25C-CDK1 alteration. Interestingly, we observed that knockdown of inhibited BCa cell migration and invasion, accompanied with alterations of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) pathway related proteins. In vivo studies confirmed the inhibition effect of knockdown on BCa cell growth and migration.

Conclusions: Our study indicates that BORA regulates BCa cell cycle and growth, meanwhile influences cell motility by EMT, and could be a novel biomarker and potential therapeutic target in BCa.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12935-020-01392-8DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7339433PMC
July 2020

Conditionally Reprogrammed Human Normal Airway Epithelial Cells at ALI: A Physiological Model for Emerging Viruses.

Virol Sin 2020 Jun 17;35(3):280-289. Epub 2020 Jun 17.

Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of Illinoi at Chicago, Chicago, IL, 60612, USA.

Cancer cell lines have been used widely in cancer biology, and as biological or functional cell systems in many biomedical research fields. These cells are usually defective for many normal activities or functions due to significant genetic and epigenetic changes. Normal primary cell yields and viability from any original tissue specimens are usually relatively low or highly variable. These normal cells cease after a few passages or population doublings due to very limited proliferative capacity. Animal models (ferret, mouse, etc.) are often used to study virus-host interaction. However, viruses usually need to be adapted to the animals by several passages due to tropism restrictions including viral receptors and intracellular restrictions. Here we summarize applications of conditionally reprogrammed cells (CRCs), long-term cultures of normal airway epithelial cells from human nose to lung generated by conditional cell reprogramming (CR) technology, as an ex vivo model in studies of emerging viruses. CR allows to robustly propagate cells from non-invasive or minimally invasive specimens, for example, nasal or endobronchial brushing. This process is rapid (2 days) and conditional. The CRCs maintain their differentiation potential and lineage functions, and have been used for studies of adenovirus, rhinovirus, respiratory syncytial virus, influenza viruses, parvovirus, and SARS-CoV. The CRCs can be easily used for air-liquid interface (ALI) polarized 3D cultures, and these coupled CRC/ALI cultures mimic physiological conditions and are suitable for studies of viral entry including receptor binding and internalization, innate immune responses, viral replications, and drug discovery as an ex vivo model for emerging viruses.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12250-020-00244-zDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7298165PMC
June 2020

MFP-FePt-GO Nanocomposites Promote Radiosensitivity of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Via Activating Mitochondrial-Mediated Apoptosis and Impairing DNA Damage Repair.

Int J Biol Sci 2020 18;16(12):2145-2158. Epub 2020 May 18.

Department of Radiation and Medical Oncology, Zhongnan Hospital of Wuhan University, Wuhan, China.

: Recent advances in nanomedicine provided promising alternatives for tumor treatment to improve the survival and life quality of cancer patients. This study was designed to explore the insight mechanisms of the anti-tumor effects of the novel nanocomposites (NCs) MFP-FePt-GO with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). : A chemical co-reduction method was applied to the synthesis process of MFP-FePt-GO NCs. The chemical synthesis efficiency and morphology of the NCs were measured with spectroscope and transmission electron microscope. Colony formation assay and cell apoptosis were conducted to assess the radiosensitivity effect of NCs with radiation. Then, we detected cell mitochondrial membrane potential and reactive oxygen species (ROS) level by flow cytometry to further explore the cause of cell death. Immunofluorescence staining and Confocal were carried out to determine the DNA damage repair. A Lewis lung carcinoma animal model was used to measure safety and anti-tumor efficiency . : The novel NCs MFP-FePt-GO designed on a lamellar-structure magnetic graphene oxide and polyethylene glycol drug delivery system was synthesized and functionalized for co-delivery of metronidazole and 5-fluorouracil. While no severe allergies, liver and kidney damage, or drug-related deaths were observed, MFP-FePt-GO NCs promoted radiosensitivity of NSCLC cells both and i. It improved the effects of radiation via activating intrinsic mitochondrial-mediated apoptosis and impairing DNA damage repair. This NCs also induced a ROS burst, which suppressed the antioxidant protein expression and induced cell apoptosis. Furthermore, MFP-FePt-GO NCs prevented NSCLC cell migration and invasion. : MFP-FePt-GO NCs showed a synergistic anti-tumor effect with radiation to eliminate tumors. With good safety and efficacy, this novel NCs could be a potential radiosensitive agent for NSCLC patients.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.7150/ijbs.46194DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7294941PMC
May 2020

Temperature-Switchable Surfactant-Free Microemulsion.

Langmuir 2020 Jul 25;36(26):7356-7364. Epub 2020 Jun 25.

Key Laboratory of Synthetic and Biological Colloids, Ministry of Education, School of Chemical & Materials Engineering, Jiangnan University, Wuxi 214122, P. R. China.

Stimuli-responsive microemulsions have recently attracted significant interest due to their unique properties. Here, we developed a novel surfactant-free microemulsion (SFME) in a nontoxic ternary mixture, in which dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) was used as an amphisolvent, n-butanol was used as a nonpolar phase, and water was used as a polar phase. The DLS results confirmed the presence of the preouzo zone, and the polarity experiment revealed that the single-phase region can be further divided into oil-in-water, bicontinuous, and water-in-oil subregions. The size of droplets increased upon increasing the water or n-butanol content but decreased with increasing DMSO content. With increasing temperature, the area of the single-phase region increased, accompanied by a decrease in the size of the droplets, and the critical point moved to the corner of n-butanol. No matter in what subregion the formulation was found, decreasing temperature to below the phase-transition temperature (PTT) will induce a transition from monophasic MEs to complete phase separation and vice versa. This is mainly attributed to the effect of temperature on the hydrogen-bond interaction. Ag nanoparticles (Ag NPs) can be prepared above the PTT and facilely separated below PTT. The Ag NPs obtained from the current SFME showed higher catalytic activity than that obtained from a common surfactant-based ME.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/acs.langmuir.0c00828DOI Listing
July 2020

Predicting the emission characteristics of VOCs in a simulated vehicle cabin environment based on small-scale chamber tests: Parameter determination and validation.

Environ Int 2020 09 7;142:105817. Epub 2020 Jun 7.

School of Mechanical Engineering, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing 100081, China. Electronic address:

Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emitted from vehicle parts and interior materials can seriously affect in-cabin air quality. Prior studies mainly focused on indoor material emissions, while studies of emissions in-cabins were relatively scarce. The emission behaviors of VOCs from vehicle cabin materials can be characterized by three key emission parameters: the initial emittable concentration (C), diffusion coefficient (D), and partition coefficient (K). Based on a C-history method, we have performed a series of tests with a 30 L small-scale chamber to determine these three key emission parameters for six VOCs, benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, xylene, formaldehyde, and acetaldehyde, from typical vehicle cabin materials, car roof upholstery, carpet, and seat. We found that acetaldehyde had the highest level in the gas-phase concentration and C, which differs from residential indoor environments where formaldehyde is usually the most prevalent pollutant. The influence of temperature on the key emission parameters was also investigated. When the temperature rose from 25 °C to 65 °C, C increased by 40-640%, D increased by 40-170%, but K decreased by 38-71% for different material-VOC combinations. We then performed an independent validation to demonstrate the accuracy of the measured key emission parameters. Furthermore, considering that in reality, several materials coexist in vehicle cabins, we made a first attempt at applying a multi-source model to predict VOC emission behaviors in a simulated 3 m vehicle cabin, using the key emission parameters obtained from the small-scale chamber tests. The good agreement between the predictions and experiments (R = 0.82-0.99) demonstrated that the three key emission parameters measured via chamber tests can be scaled to estimate emission scenarios in realistic vehicle cabin environments. A pollution contribution analysis for the tested materials indicated that the car seat could significantly contribute to the total emissions.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.envint.2020.105817DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7485589PMC
September 2020

Conditionally Reprogrammed Cells from Patient-Derived Xenograft to Model Neuroendocrine Prostate Cancer Development.

Cells 2020 06 4;9(6). Epub 2020 Jun 4.

Vancouver Prostate Centre, Department of Urologic Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC V6H 3Z6, Canada.

Neuroendocrine prostate cancer (NEPC) is a lethal subtype of prostate cancer. It develops mainly via NE transdifferentiation of prostate adenocarcinoma in response to androgen receptor (AR)-inhibition therapy. The study of NEPC development has been hampered by a lack of clinically relevant models. We previously established a unique and first-in-field patient-derived xenograft (PDX) model of adenocarcinoma (LTL331)-to-NEPC (LTL331R) transdifferentiation. In this study, we applied conditional reprogramming (CR) culture to establish a LTL331 PDX-derived cancer cell line named LTL331_CR_Cell. These cells retain the same genomic mutations as the LTL331 parental tumor. They can be continuously propagated in vitro and can be genetically manipulated. Androgen deprivation treatment on LTL331_CR_Cells had no effect on cell proliferation. Transcriptomic analyses comparing the LTL331_CR_Cell to its parental tumor revealed a profound downregulation of the androgen response pathway and an upregulation of stem and basal cell marker genes. The transcriptome of LTL331_CR_Cells partially resembles that of post-castrated LTL331 xenografts in mice. Notably, when grafted under the renal capsules of male NOD/SCID mice, LTL331_CR_Cells spontaneously gave rise to NEPC tumors. This is evidenced by the histological expression of the NE marker CD56 and the loss of adenocarcinoma markers such as PSA. Transcriptomic analyses of the newly developed NEPC tumors further demonstrate marked enrichment of NEPC signature genes and loss of AR signaling genes. This study provides a novel research tool derived from a unique PDX model. It allows for the investigation of mechanisms underlying NEPC development by enabling gene manipulations ex vivo and subsequent functional evaluations in vivo.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/cells9061398DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7349646PMC
June 2020

Conditional reprogramming: Modeling urological cancer and translation to clinics.

Clin Transl Med 2020 Jun 5;10(2):e95. Epub 2020 Jun 5.

Department of Urology, Zhongnan Hospital of Wuhan University, Wuhan, China.

Patient-derived models, including cell models (organoids and conditionally reprogrammed cells [CRCs]) and patient-derived xenografts, are urgently needed for both basic and translational cancer research. Conditional reprogramming (CR) technique refers to a co-culture system of primary human normal or tumor cells with irradiated murine fibroblasts in the presence of a Rho-associated kinase inhibitor to allow the primary cells to acquire stem cell properties and the ability to proliferate indefinitely in vitro without any exogenous gene or viral transfection. Considering its robust features, the CR technique may facilitate cancer research in many aspects. Under in vitro culturing, malignant CRCs can share certain genetic aberrations and tumor phenotypes with their parental specimens. Thus, tumor CRCs can promisingly be utilized for the study of cancer biology, the discovery of novel therapies, and the promotion of precision medicine. For normal CRCs, the characteristics of normal karyotype maintenance and lineage commitment suggest their potential in toxicity testing and regenerative medicine. In this review, we discuss the applications, limitations, and future potential of CRCs in modeling urological cancer and translation to clinics.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ctm2.95DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7403683PMC
June 2020

Retest positive for SARS-CoV-2 RNA of "recovered" patients with COVID-19: Persistence, sampling issues, or re-infection?

J Med Virol 2020 11 9;92(11):2263-2265. Epub 2020 Jun 9.

Departments of Pathology and Oncology, Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center, Georgetown University Medical Center, Washington, District of Columbia.

"Retest Positive" for severe acute respiratory syndrome-related coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2) from "recovered" coronavirus disease-19 (COVID-19) has been reported and raised several important questions for this novel coronavirus and COVID-19 disease. In this commentary, we discussed several questions: (a) Can SARS-CoV-2 re-infect the individuals who recovered from COVID-19? This question is also associated with other questions: whether or not SARS-CoV-2 infection induces protective reaction or neutralized antibody? Will SARS-CoV-2 vaccines work? (b) Why could some recovered patients with COVID-19 be re-tested positive for SARS-CoV-2 RNA? (c) Are some recovered pwith atients COVID-19 with re-testing positive for SARS-CoV-2 RNA infectious? and (d) How should the COVID-19 patients with retest positive for SARS-CoV-2 be managed?
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jmv.26114DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7300489PMC
November 2020

Conditional cell reprogramming for modeling host-virus interactions and human viral diseases.

J Med Virol 2020 11 16;92(11):2440-2452. Epub 2020 Jun 16.

Department of Pathology, Center for Cell Reprogramming, Georgetown University Medical Center, Washington, DC.

Conventional cancer and transformed cell lines are widely used in cancer biology and other fields within biology. These cells usually have abnormalities from the original tumor itself, but may also develop abnormalities due to genetic manipulation, or genetic and epigenetic changes during long-term passages. Primary cultures may maintain lineage functions as the original tissue types, yet they have a very limited life span or population doubling time because of the nature of cellular senescence. Primary cultures usually have very low yields, and the high variability from any original tissue specimens, largely limiting their applications in research. Animal models are often used for studies of virus infections, disease modeling, development of antiviral drugs, and vaccines. Human viruses often need a series of passages in vivo to adapt to the host environment because of variable receptors on the cell surface and may have intracellular restrictions from the cell types or host species. Here, we describe a long-term cell culture system, conditionally reprogrammed cells (CRCs), and its applications in modeling human viral diseases and drug discovery. Using feeder layer coculture in presence of Y-27632 (conditional reprogramming, CR), CRCs can be obtained and rapidly propagated from surgical specimens, core or needle biopsies, and other minimally invasive or noninvasive specimens, for example, nasal cavity brushing. CRCs preserve their lineage functions and provide biologically relevant and physiological conditions, which are suitable for studies of viral entry and replication, innate immune responses of host cells, and discovery of antiviral drugs. In this review, we summarize the applications of CR technology in modeling host-virus interactions and human viral diseases including severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 and coronavirus disease-2019, and antiviral discovery.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jmv.26093DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7586785PMC
November 2020

Asymptomatic cases with SARS-CoV-2 infection.

J Med Virol 2020 Sep 22;92(9):1401-1403. Epub 2020 May 22.

Department of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, Beijing Institute of Respiratory Medicine, Beijing Chao-Yang Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing, China.

On 31 March 2020, Chinese Health Authorization announced that numbers of asymptomatic cases with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection will be made to the public daily. This was a very important step since different counties have different capacities for the detection of SARS-CoV-2 infection and control strategy for the Coronavirus Disease 2019 outbreak. We summarized the characteristics of asymptomatic SARS-CoV-2 infections and the transmission potential of asymptomatic cases. Then we provided guidelines for the management of asymptomatic cases through quarantine and nucleic acid/serology tests.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jmv.25990DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7267605PMC
September 2020

Cytochrome P450 metabolism mediates low-temperature resistance in pinewood nematode.

FEBS Open Bio 2020 06 22;10(6):1171-1179. Epub 2020 May 22.

College of Forestry, Northeast Forestry University, Harbin, China.

Pinewood nematode (PWN; Bursaphelenchus xylophilus) is a devastating invasive species that is expanding into colder regions. Here, we investigated the molecular mechanisms underlying low-temperature resistance of PWN. We identified differentially expressed genes enriched under low temperature in previously published transcriptome data using the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes. Quantitative real-time PCR was used to further validate the transcript level changes of three known cytochrome P450 genes under low temperature. RNA interference was used to validate the low-temperature resistance function of three cytochrome P450 genes from PWN. We report that differentially expressed genes were significantly enriched in two cytochrome P450-related pathways under low-temperature treatment. Heatmap visualization of transcript levels of cytochrome P450-related genes revealed widely different transcript patterns between PWNs treated under low and regular temperatures. Transcript levels of three cytochrome P450 genes from PWNs were elevated at low temperature, and knockdown of these genes decreased the survival rates of PWNs under low temperature. In summary, these findings suggest that cytochrome P450 metabolism plays a critical role in the low-temperature resistance mechanism of PWN.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/2211-5463.12871DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7262887PMC
June 2020

Global injury morbidity and mortality from 1990 to 2017: results from the Global Burden of Disease Study 2017.

Authors:
Spencer L James Chris D Castle Zachary V Dingels Jack T Fox Erin B Hamilton Zichen Liu Nicholas L S Roberts Dillon O Sylte Nathaniel J Henry Kate E LeGrand Ahmed Abdelalim Amir Abdoli Ibrahim Abdollahpour Rizwan Suliankatchi Abdulkader Aidin Abedi Akine Eshete Abosetugn Abdelrahman I Abushouk Oladimeji M Adebayo Marcela Agudelo-Botero Tauseef Ahmad Rushdia Ahmed Muktar Beshir Ahmed Miloud Taki Eddine Aichour Fares Alahdab Genet Melak Alamene Fahad Mashhour Alanezi Animut Alebel Niguse Meles Alema Suliman A Alghnam Samar Al-Hajj Beriwan Abdulqadir Ali Saqib Ali Mahtab Alikhani Cyrus Alinia Vahid Alipour Syed Mohamed Aljunid Amir Almasi-Hashiani Nihad A Almasri Khalid Altirkawi Yasser Sami Abdeldayem Amer Saeed Amini Arianna Maever Loreche Amit Catalina Liliana Andrei Alireza Ansari-Moghaddam Carl Abelardo T Antonio Seth Christopher Yaw Appiah Jalal Arabloo Morteza Arab-Zozani Zohreh Arefi Olatunde Aremu Filippo Ariani Amit Arora Malke Asaad Babak Asghari Nefsu Awoke Beatriz Paulina Ayala Quintanilla Getinet Ayano Martin Amogre Ayanore Samad Azari Ghasem Azarian Alaa Badawi Ashish D Badiye Eleni Bagli Atif Amin Baig Mohan Bairwa Ahad Bakhtiari Arun Balachandran Maciej Banach Srikanta K Banerjee Palash Chandra Banik Amrit Banstola Suzanne Lyn Barker-Collo Till Winfried Bärnighausen Lope H Barrero Akbar Barzegar Mohsen Bayati Bayisa Abdissa Baye Neeraj Bedi Masoud Behzadifar Tariku Tesfaye Bekuma Habte Belete Corina Benjet Derrick A Bennett Isabela M Bensenor Kidanemaryam Berhe Pankaj Bhardwaj Anusha Ganapati Bhat Krittika Bhattacharyya Sadia Bibi Ali Bijani Muhammad Shahdaat Bin Sayeed Guilherme Borges Antonio Maria Borzì Soufiane Boufous Alexandra Brazinova Nikolay Ivanovich Briko Shyam S Budhathoki Josip Car Rosario Cárdenas Félix Carvalho João Mauricio Castaldelli-Maia Carlos A Castañeda-Orjuela Giulio Castelpietra Ferrán Catalá-López Ester Cerin Joht S Chandan Wagaye Fentahun Chanie Soosanna Kumary Chattu Vijay Kumar Chattu Irini Chatziralli Neha Chaudhary Daniel Youngwhan Cho Mohiuddin Ahsanul Kabir Chowdhury Dinh-Toi Chu Samantha M Colquhoun Maria-Magdalena Constantin Vera M Costa Giovanni Damiani Ahmad Daryani Claudio Alberto Dávila-Cervantes Feleke Mekonnen Demeke Asmamaw Bizuneh Demis Gebre Teklemariam Demoz Desalegn Getnet Demsie Afshin Derakhshani Kebede Deribe Rupak Desai Mostafa Dianati Nasab Diana Dias da Silva Zahra Sadat Dibaji Forooshani Kerrie E Doyle Tim Robert Driscoll Eleonora Dubljanin Bereket Duko Adema Arielle Wilder Eagan Aziz Eftekhari Elham Ehsani-Chimeh Maysaa El Sayed Zaki Demelash Abewa Elemineh Shaimaa I El-Jaafary Ziad El-Khatib Christian Lycke Ellingsen Mohammad Hassan Emamian Daniel Adane Endalew Sharareh Eskandarieh Pawan Sirwan Faris Andre Faro Farshad Farzadfar Yousef Fatahi Wubalem Fekadu Tomas Y Ferede Seyed-Mohammad Fereshtehnejad Eduarda Fernandes Pietro Ferrara Garumma Tolu Feyissa Irina Filip Florian Fischer Morenike Oluwatoyin Folayan Masoud Foroutan Joel Msafiri Francis Richard Charles Franklin Takeshi Fukumoto Biniyam Sahiledengle Geberemariyam Abadi Kahsu Gebre Ketema Bizuwork Gebremedhin Gebreamlak Gebremedhn Gebremeskel Berhe Gebremichael Getnet Azeze Gedefaw Birhanu Geta Mansour Ghafourifard Farhad Ghamari Ahmad Ghashghaee Asadollah Gholamian Tiffany K Gill Alessandra C Goulart Ayman Grada Michal Grivna Mohammed Ibrahim Mohialdeen Gubari Rafael Alves Guimarães Yuming Guo Gaurav Gupta Juanita A Haagsma Nima Hafezi-Nejad Hassan Haghparast Bidgoli Brian James Hall Randah R Hamadeh Samer Hamidi Josep Maria Haro Md Mehedi Hasan Amir Hasanzadeh Soheil Hassanipour Hadi Hassankhani Hamid Yimam Hassen Rasmus Havmoeller Khezar Hayat Delia Hendrie Fatemeh Heydarpour Martha Híjar Hung Chak Ho Chi Linh Hoang Michael K Hole Ramesh Holla Naznin Hossain Mehdi Hosseinzadeh Sorin Hostiuc Guoqing Hu Segun Emmanuel Ibitoye Olayinka Stephen Ilesanmi Irena Ilic Milena D Ilic Leeberk Raja Inbaraj Endang Indriasih Seyed Sina Naghibi Irvani Sheikh Mohammed Shariful Islam M Mofizul Islam Rebecca Q Ivers Kathryn H Jacobsen Mohammad Ali Jahani Nader Jahanmehr Mihajlo Jakovljevic Farzad Jalilian Sudha Jayaraman Achala Upendra Jayatilleke Ravi Prakash Jha Yetunde O John-Akinola Jost B Jonas Nitin Joseph Farahnaz Joukar Jacek Jerzy Jozwiak Suresh Banayya Jungari Mikk Jürisson Ali Kabir Rajendra Kadel Amaha Kahsay Leila R Kalankesh Rohollah Kalhor Teshome Abegaz Kamil Tanuj Kanchan Neeti Kapoor Manoochehr Karami Amir Kasaeian Hagazi Gebremedhin Kassaye Taras Kavetskyy Hafte Kahsay Kebede Peter Njenga Keiyoro Abraham Getachew Kelbore Bayew Kelkay Yousef Saleh Khader Morteza Abdullatif Khafaie Nauman Khalid Ibrahim A Khalil Rovshan Khalilov Mohammad Khammarnia Ejaz Ahmad Khan Maseer Khan Tripti Khanna Habibolah Khazaie Fatemeh Khosravi Shadmani Roba Khundkar Daniel N Kiirithio Young-Eun Kim Daniel Kim Yun Jin Kim Adnan Kisa Sezer Kisa Hamidreza Komaki Shivakumar K M Kondlahalli Vladimir Andreevich Korshunov Ai Koyanagi Moritz U G Kraemer Kewal Krishan Burcu Kucuk Bicer Nuworza Kugbey Vivek Kumar Nithin Kumar G Anil Kumar Manasi Kumar Girikumar Kumaresh Om P Kurmi Oluwatosin Kuti Carlo La Vecchia Faris Hasan Lami Prabhat Lamichhane Justin J Lang Van C Lansingh Dennis Odai Laryea Savita Lasrado Arman Latifi Paolo Lauriola Janet L Leasher Shaun Wen Huey Lee Tsegaye Lolaso Lenjebo Miriam Levi Shanshan Li Shai Linn Xuefeng Liu Alan D Lopez Paulo A Lotufo Raimundas Lunevicius Ronan A Lyons Mohammed Madadin Muhammed Magdy Abd El Razek Narayan Bahadur Mahotra Marek Majdan Azeem Majeed Jeadran N Malagon-Rojas Venkatesh Maled Reza Malekzadeh Deborah Carvalho Malta Navid Manafi Amir Manafi Ana-Laura Manda Narayana Manjunatha Fariborz Mansour-Ghanaei Borhan Mansouri Mohammad Ali Mansournia Joemer C Maravilla Lyn M March Amanda J Mason-Jones Seyedeh Zahra Masoumi Benjamin Ballard Massenburg Pallab K Maulik Gebrekiros Gebremichael Meles Addisu Melese Zeleke Aschalew Melketsedik Peter T N Memiah Walter Mendoza Ritesh G Menezes Meresa Berwo Mengesha Melkamu Merid Mengesha Tuomo J Meretoja Atte Meretoja Hayimro Edemealem Merie Tomislav Mestrovic Bartosz Miazgowski Tomasz Miazgowski Ted R Miller G K Mini Andreea Mirica Erkin M Mirrakhimov Mehdi Mirzaei-Alavijeh Prasanna Mithra Babak Moazen Masoud Moghadaszadeh Efat Mohamadi Yousef Mohammad Karzan Abdulmuhsin Mohammad Aso Mohammad Darwesh Naser Mohammad Gholi Mezerji Abdollah Mohammadian-Hafshejani Milad Mohammadoo-Khorasani Reza Mohammadpourhodki Shafiu Mohammed Jemal Abdu Mohammed Farnam Mohebi Mariam Molokhia Lorenzo Monasta Yoshan Moodley Mahmood Moosazadeh Masoud Moradi Ghobad Moradi Maziar Moradi-Lakeh Farhad Moradpour Lidia Morawska Ilais Moreno Velásquez Naho Morisaki Shane Douglas Morrison Tilahun Belete Mossie Atalay Goshu Muluneh Srinivas Murthy Kamarul Imran Musa Ghulam Mustafa Ashraf F Nabhan Ahamarshan Jayaraman Nagarajan Gurudatta Naik Mukhammad David Naimzada Farid Najafi Vinay Nangia Bruno Ramos Nascimento Morteza Naserbakht Vinod Nayak Duduzile Edith Ndwandwe Ionut Negoi Josephine W Ngunjiri Cuong Tat Nguyen Huong Lan Thi Nguyen Rajan Nikbakhsh Dina Nur Anggraini Ningrum Chukwudi A Nnaji Peter S Nyasulu Felix Akpojene Ogbo Onome Bright Oghenetega In-Hwan Oh Emmanuel Wandera Okunga Andrew T Olagunju Tinuke O Olagunju Ahmed Omar Bali Obinna E Onwujekwe Kwaku Oppong Asante Heather M Orpana Erika Ota Nikita Otstavnov Stanislav S Otstavnov Mahesh P A Jagadish Rao Padubidri Smita Pakhale Keyvan Pakshir Songhomitra Panda-Jonas Eun-Kee Park Sangram Kishor Patel Ashish Pathak Sanghamitra Pati George C Patton Kebreab Paulos Amy E Peden Veincent Christian Filipino Pepito Jeevan Pereira Hai Quang Pham Michael R Phillips Marina Pinheiro Roman V Polibin Suzanne Polinder Hossein Poustchi Swayam Prakash Dimas Ria Angga Pribadi Parul Puri Zahiruddin Quazi Syed Mohammad Rabiee Navid Rabiee Amir Radfar Anwar Rafay Ata Rafiee Alireza Rafiei Fakher Rahim Siavash Rahimi Vafa Rahimi-Movaghar Muhammad Aziz Rahman Ali Rajabpour-Sanati Fatemeh Rajati Ivo Rakovac Kavitha Ranganathan Sowmya J Rao Vahid Rashedi Prateek Rastogi Priya Rathi Salman Rawaf Lal Rawal Reza Rawassizadeh Vishnu Renjith Andre M N Renzaho Serge Resnikoff Aziz Rezapour Ana Isabel Ribeiro Jennifer Rickard Carlos Miguel Rios González Luca Ronfani Gholamreza Roshandel Anas M Saad Yogesh Damodar Sabde Siamak Sabour Basema Saddik Saeed Safari Roya Safari-Faramani Hamid Safarpour Mahdi Safdarian S Mohammad Sajadi Payman Salamati Farkhonde Salehi Saleh Salehi Zahabi Marwa R Rashad Salem Hosni Salem Omar Salman Inbal Salz Abdallah M Samy Juan Sanabria Lidia Sanchez Riera Milena M Santric Milicevic Abdur Razzaque Sarker Arash Sarveazad Brijesh Sathian Monika Sawhney Susan M Sawyer Sonia Saxena Mehdi Sayyah David C Schwebel Soraya Seedat Subramanian Senthilkumaran Sadaf G Sepanlou Seyedmojtaba Seyedmousavi Feng Sha Faramarz Shaahmadi Saeed Shahabi Masood Ali Shaikh Mehran Shams-Beyranvand Morteza Shamsizadeh Mahdi Sharif-Alhoseini Hamid Sharifi Aziz Sheikh Mika Shigematsu Jae Il Shin Rahman Shiri Soraya Siabani Inga Dora Sigfusdottir Pankaj Kumar Singh Jasvinder A Singh Dhirendra Narain Sinha Catalin-Gabriel Smarandache Emma U R Smith Amin Soheili Bija Soleymani Ali Reza Soltanian Joan B Soriano Muluken Bekele Sorrie Ireneous N Soyiri Dan J Stein Mark A Stokes Mu'awiyyah Babale Sufiyan Hafiz Ansar Rasul Suleria Bryan L Sykes Rafael Tabarés-Seisdedos Karen M Tabb Biruk Wogayehu Taddele Degena Bahrey Tadesse Animut Tagele Tamiru Ingan Ukur Tarigan Yonatal Mesfin Tefera Arash Tehrani-Banihashemi Merhawi Gebremedhin Tekle Gebretsadkan Hintsa Tekulu Ayenew Kassie Tesema Berhe Etsay Tesfay Rekha Thapar Asres Bedaso Tilahune Kenean Getaneh Tlaye Hamid Reza Tohidinik Roman Topor-Madry Bach Xuan Tran Khanh Bao Tran Jaya Prasad Tripathy Alexander C Tsai Lorainne Tudor Car Saif Ullah Irfan Ullah Maida Umar Bhaskaran Unnikrishnan Era Upadhyay Olalekan A Uthman Pascual R Valdez Tommi Juhani Vasankari Narayanaswamy Venketasubramanian Francesco S Violante Vasily Vlassov Yasir Waheed Girmay Teklay Weldesamuel Andrea Werdecker Taweewat Wiangkham Haileab Fekadu Wolde Dawit Habte Woldeyes Dawit Zewdu Wondafrash Temesgen Gebeyehu Wondmeneh Adam Belay Wondmieneh Ai-Min Wu Rajaram Yadav Ali Yadollahpour Yuichiro Yano Sanni Yaya Vahid Yazdi-Feyzabadi Paul Yip Engida Yisma Naohiro Yonemoto Seok-Jun Yoon Yoosik Youm Mustafa Z Younis Zabihollah Yousefi Yong Yu Chuanhua Yu Hasan Yusefzadeh Telma Zahirian Moghadam Zoubida Zaidi Sojib Bin Zaman Mohammad Zamani Maryam Zamanian Hamed Zandian Ahmad Zarei Fatemeh Zare Zhi-Jiang Zhang Yunquan Zhang Sanjay Zodpey Lalit Dandona Rakhi Dandona Louisa Degenhardt Samath Dhamminda Dharmaratne Simon I Hay Ali H Mokdad Robert C Reiner Benn Sartorius Theo Vos

Inj Prev 2020 Oct 24;26(Supp 1):i96-i114. Epub 2020 Apr 24.

Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA.

Background: Past research in population health trends has shown that injuries form a substantial burden of population health loss. Regular updates to injury burden assessments are critical. We report Global Burden of Disease (GBD) 2017 Study estimates on morbidity and mortality for all injuries.

Methods: We reviewed results for injuries from the GBD 2017 study. GBD 2017 measured injury-specific mortality and years of life lost (YLLs) using the Cause of Death Ensemble model. To measure non-fatal injuries, GBD 2017 modelled injury-specific incidence and converted this to prevalence and years lived with disability (YLDs). YLLs and YLDs were summed to calculate disability-adjusted life years (DALYs).

Findings: In 1990, there were 4 260 493 (4 085 700 to 4 396 138) injury deaths, which increased to 4 484 722 (4 332 010 to 4 585 554) deaths in 2017, while age-standardised mortality decreased from 1079 (1073 to 1086) to 738 (730 to 745) per 100 000. In 1990, there were 354 064 302 (95% uncertainty interval: 338 174 876 to 371 610 802) new cases of injury globally, which increased to 520 710 288 (493 430 247 to 547 988 635) new cases in 2017. During this time, age-standardised incidence decreased non-significantly from 6824 (6534 to 7147) to 6763 (6412 to 7118) per 100 000. Between 1990 and 2017, age-standardised DALYs decreased from 4947 (4655 to 5233) per 100 000 to 3267 (3058 to 3505).

Interpretation: Injuries are an important cause of health loss globally, though mortality has declined between 1990 and 2017. Future research in injury burden should focus on prevention in high-burden populations, improving data collection and ensuring access to medical care.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/injuryprev-2019-043494DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7571366PMC
October 2020