Dr. Xinyu Zhang, PhD - University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Dr. Xinyu Zhang

PhD

University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

USA

Dr. Xinyu Zhang, PhD - University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Dr. Xinyu Zhang

PhD

Introduction

Primary Affiliation: University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign - USA

Publications

6Publications

26Reads

2893Profile Views

6PubMed Central Citations

Determining Critical Factors Controlling Off-Site Transport of Pyrethroids in the Urban Environment

DOI: 10.1021/bk-2014-1168.ch003 In book: Describing the Behavior and Effects of Pesticides in Urban

Describing the Behavior and Effects of Pesticides in Urban and Agricultural Settings, Chapter: 3

Identifying critical factors that control the off-site transport of pyrethoids in the urban environment is critical to the safe and effective use of pyrethroids in the control of insects for home and business owners. This work uses a data mining approach to extract critical event variables from an urban study site that had been operational for a year (August, 2011 – August, 2012). Six applications occurred for four surfaces (driveway, garage door, grass perimeter, and house wall) and one application to the grass lawn following historic and revised practices. A Multivariate Adaptive Regression Spline (MARS) modeling approach was used to statistically model the percent of pyrethroid mass applied (percent washoff) from all surfaces. This approach yielded accurate models for all surfaces, with the driveway surface having the simplest model of percent © 2014 American Chemical Society washoff. The MARS modeling approach allows very dynamic changes in variables to represent complex behavior at the sites—integrating many variables to calculate percent washoff. For all surfaces, a near-post application period (around 14 days for all surfaces except the grass lawn, which had an extended multiple month period post application) controlled washoff particularly during low intensity lawn sprinkler events. During natural and simulated rainfall events, the dynamics of washoff included multiple types of characterizing runoff factors (from 10, 20, 30, and 60 min maximum runoff rates), the rainfall amounts, days since the previous application of a pyretheroid, among other factors. In addition, a number of other often minor factors were included by the MARS models for each surface for the calculation of percent washoff that warrant further investigation.

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September 2014
10 Reads

Lignocellulosic hydrolysates and extracellular electron shuttles for H2 production using co-culture fermentation with Clostridium beijerinckii and Geobacter metallireducens.

Bioresour Technol 2013 Nov 30;147:89-95. Epub 2013 Jul 30.

Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.biortech.2013.07.106DOI Listing
November 2013
10 Reads
4.494 Impact Factor

Exogenous anthrahydroquinone-2,6-disulfonate specifically increases xylose utilization during mixed sugar fermentation by Clostridium beijerinckii NCIMB 8052

International Journal of Hydrogen Energy (Impact Factor: 3.55). 02/2013; 38(6):2719–2727. DOI: 10.10

International Journal of Hydrogen Energy

The influence of a reduced extracellular electron shuttle (anthrahydroquinone-2,6-disulfonate, AH2QDS) on substrate utilization and H2 production was investigated at different glucose:xylose ratios using the fermentative culture Clostridium beijerinckii NCIMB 8052. Adding 250 μM AH2QDS increased the total substrate utilization by 23–66%, and specifically xylose utilization by 20–54% at glucose:xylose ratios of 1:1, 1:3 and 1:9. Adding 250 μM AH2QDS also increased the substrate utilization by 40–88% at all tested glucose:xylose ratios (which ranged from 1:9 to 9:1). Increasing AH2QDS concentrations from 250 μM to 2 mM increased xylose utilization (>99% xylose consumed) as well as cumulative hydrogen production during mixed sugar fermentation. The extent of glucose utilization was consistent amongst all tests, which was expected. However, hydroquinone amendment specifically increased the extent of xylose utilized irrespective of the starting glucose:xylose ratio. To the best of our knowledge this is the first report of 100% xylose utilization by C. beijerinckii NCIMB 8052 grown under mixed sugar conditions. These data demonstrate that the substrate utilization, particularly xylose utilization, can be manipulated by amending extracellular redox active compounds. This will improve pentose utilization during fermentation of hydrolyzates that result from pre-treatment of lignocellulosic materials with wild type (non-GMO) cultures.

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February 2013
10 Reads

Interactions between Clostridium beijerinckii and Geobacter metallireducens in co-culture fermentation with anthrahydroquinone-2, 6-disulfonate (AH2QDS) for enhanced biohydrogen production from xylose.

Biotechnol Bioeng 2013 Jan 1;110(1):164-72. Epub 2012 Sep 1.

Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois 61801, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/bit.24627DOI Listing
January 2013
8 Reads
5 Citations
4.130 Impact Factor

Anthrahydroquinone-2,6-disulfonate increases the rate of hydrogen production during Clostridium beijerinckii fermentation with glucose, xylose, and cellobiose

International Journal of Hydrogen Energy (Impact Factor: 3.55). 08/2012; 37(16):11701–11709. DOI: 10

International Journal of Hydrogen Energy

Fermentative hydrogen production is considered a reasonable alternative for generating H2 as an energy carrier for electricity production using hydrogen fuel cells. The kinetics of hydrogen production from glucose, xylose and cellobiose were investigated using pure culture Clostridium beijerinckii NCIMB 8052. Adding anthrahydroquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AH2QDS) at concentrations ranging from 100 μM to 500 μM increased the hydrogen production rates from 0.80 to 1.35 mmol/L-hr to 1.20–2.70 mmol/L-hr with glucose, xylose, or cellobiose as the primary substrates. AH2QDS amendment also increased the substrate utilization rate and biomass growth rate by at least two times. These findings suggest that adding hydroquinone reducing equivalents influence cellular metabolism with hydrogen production rate, substrate utilization rate, and growth rate being simultaneously affected. Resting cell suspensions were conducted to investigate the influence of AH2QDS on the hydrogen production rate from glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate, which is a shared intermediate in both glycolysis and pentose phosphate pathway. Data demonstrated that hydrogen production rate increased by 1.5 times when glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate was the sole carbon source, suggesting that the hydroquinone may alter reactions starting with or after glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate in central metabolism. These data demonstrate that adding hydroquinones increased overall metabolic activity of C. beijerinckii. This will eventually increase the efficiency of industrial scale production once appropriate hydroquinone equivalents are identified that work well in large-scale operations, since fermentation rate is one of the two critical factors (production rate and yield) influencing efficiency and cost.

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August 2012
10 Reads

Anthrahydroquinone-2,6,-disulfonate (AH2QDS) increases hydrogen molar yield and xylose utilization in growing cultures of Clostridium beijerinckii.

Appl Microbiol Biotechnol 2011 Nov 23;92(4):855-64. Epub 2011 Sep 23.

Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801, USA.

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http://link.springer.com/content/pdf/10.1007/s00253-011-3571
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http://link.springer.com/10.1007/s00253-011-3571-1
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00253-011-3571-1DOI Listing
November 2011
8 Reads
1 Citation
3.340 Impact Factor