Publications by authors named "Xingfang Liu"

5 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Celastrol ameliorates inflammatory pain and modulates HMGB1/NF-κB signaling pathway in dorsal root ganglion.

Neurosci Lett 2019 01 2;692:83-89. Epub 2018 Nov 2.

Department of Physiology, Gannan Medical University, Ganzhou, 341000, PR China; Institute of Pain Medicine, First Affiliated Hospital of Gannan Medical University, Ganzhou, 341000, PR China. Electronic address:

Evidences reported that high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) played a pivotal role in the modulation of chronic inflammatory pain. Celastrol, a bioactive component extracted from Tripterygium wilfordii Hook, possesses anti-inflammatory activity, but the underlying mechanism remains to be fully clarified. We aim to investigate whether HMGB1 in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) participates in the effect of celastrol on inflammatory pain. Complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA)-induced inflammatory pain rat model was used. Paw withdrawal latency (PWL) was detected to evaluate the effects of celastrol on CFA-evoked inflammatory pain. After application of celastrol (1mg/kg, i.p.) on day 1, 3, 7 and 14 post-CFA injection, the expression levels of HMGB1, NF-κB, some proinflammatory markers, GFAP and CD11b in DRG were determined by qRT-PCR and western blot analysis. These results showed that celastrol significantly suppressed HMGB1, NF-κB and IL-1β mRNA and protein expression in DRG and alleviated CFA-evoked thermal hyperalgesia. Furthermore, celastrol obviously inhibited COX-2 protein expression and down-regulated IL-6, IL-17, TNF-α, MCP-1, GFAP and CD11b mRNA levels in DRG of CFA rats. Collectively, the present study firstly provide evidences of the anti-inflammatory effect of celastrol via suppressing CFA-induced the activation of HMGB1/NF-κB signaling pathway in DRG, which maybe a potential therapeutic target for celastrol alleviating inflammatory pain.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.neulet.2018.11.002DOI Listing
January 2019

Surface Evolution of Nano-Textured 4H-SiC Homoepitaxial Layers after High Temperature Treatments: Morphology Characterization and Graphene Growth.

Nanomaterials (Basel) 2015 Sep 18;5(3):1532-1543. Epub 2015 Sep 18.

Key Laboratory of Semiconductor Materials Science, Institute of Semiconductors, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 912, Beijing 100083, China.

Nano-textured 4H-SiC homoepitaxial layers (NSiCLs) were grown on 4H-SiC(0001) substrates using a low pressure chemical vapor deposition technique (LPCVD), and subsequently were subjected to high temperature treatments (HTTs) for investigation of their surface morphology evolution and graphene growth. It was found that continuously distributed nano-scale patterns formed on NSiCLs which were about submicrons in-plane and about 100 nanometers out-of-plane in size. After HTTs under vacuum, pattern sizes reduced, and the sizes of the remains were inversely proportional to the treatment time. Referring to Raman spectra, the establishment of multi-layer graphene (MLG) on NSiCL surfaces was observed. MLG with ² disorders was obtained from NSiCLs after a high temperature treatment under vacuum at 1700 K for two hours, while MLG without ² disorders was obtained under Ar atmosphere at 1900 K.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/nano5031532DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5304623PMC
September 2015

Effect of Growth Pressure on Epitaxial Graphene Grown on 4H-SiC Substrates by Using Ethene Chemical Vapor Deposition.

Materials (Basel) 2015 Aug 26;8(9):5586-5596. Epub 2015 Aug 26.

Key Laboratory of Semiconductor Materials Science, Institute of Semiconductors, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 912, Beijing 100083, China.

The Si(0001) face and C(000-1) face dependences on growth pressure of epitaxial graphene (EG) grown on 4H-SiC substrates by ethene chemical vapor deposition (CVD) was studied using atomic force microscopy (AFM) and micro-Raman spectroscopy (μ-Raman). AFM revealed that EGs on Si-faced substrates had clear stepped morphologies due to surface step bunching. However, This EG formation did not occur on C-faced substrates. It was shown by μ-Raman that the properties of EG on both polar faces were different. EGs on Si-faced substrates were relatively thinner and more uniform than on C-faced substrates at low growth pressure. On the other hand, D band related defects always appeared in EGs on Si-faced substrates, but they did not appear in EG on C-faced substrate at an appropriate growth pressure. This was due to the μ-Raman covering the step edges when measurements were performed on Si-faced substrates. The results of this study are useful for optimized growth of EG on polar surfaces of SiC substrates.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/ma8095263DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5512615PMC
August 2015

Growth of Hexagonal Columnar Nanograin Structured SiC Thin Films on Silicon Substrates with Graphene-Graphitic Carbon Nanoflakes Templates from Solid Carbon Sources.

Materials (Basel) 2013 Apr 16;6(4):1543-1553. Epub 2013 Apr 16.

Key Laboratory of Semiconductor Materials Science, Institute of Semiconductors, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100083, China.

We report a new method for growing hexagonal columnar nanograin structured silicon carbide (SiC) thin films on silicon substrates by using graphene-graphitic carbon nanoflakes (GGNs) templates from solid carbon sources. The growth was carried out in a conventional low pressure chemical vapor deposition system (LPCVD). The GGNs are small plates with lateral sizes of around 100 nm and overlap each other, and are made up of nanosized multilayer graphene and graphitic carbon matrix (GCM). Long and straight SiC nanograins with hexagonal shapes, and with lateral sizes of around 200-400 nm are synthesized on the GGNs, which form compact SiC thin films.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/ma6041543DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5452306PMC
April 2013

Dependence of the electrical and optical properties on growth interruption in AlAs/In0.53Ga0.47As/InAs resonant tunneling diodes.

Nanoscale Res Lett 2011 Nov 23;6(1):603. Epub 2011 Nov 23.

Key Laboratory of Semiconductor Materials Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P, O, Box 912, Beijing, 100083, People's Republic of China.

The dependence of interface roughness of pseudomorphic AlAs/In0.53Ga0.47As/InAs resonant tunneling diodes [RTDs] grown by molecular beam epitaxy on interruption time was studied by current-voltage [I-V] characteristics, photoluminescence [PL] spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy [TEM]. We have observed that a splitting in the quantum-well PL due to island formation in the quantum well is sensitive to growth interruption at the AlAs/In0.53Ga0.47As interfaces. TEM images also show flatter interfaces with a few islands which only occur by applying an optimum value of interruption time. The symmetry of I-V characteristics of RTDs with PL and TEM results is consistent because tunneling current is highly dependent on barrier thickness and interface roughness.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1556-276X-6-603DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3238496PMC
November 2011