Publications by authors named "Xiling Deng"

3 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

In-vitro and in-vivo monitoring of gold(III) ions from intermediate metabolite of sodium aurothiomalate through water-soluble ruthenium (II) complex-based luminescent probe.

Bioorg Chem 2021 Feb 19;110:104749. Epub 2021 Feb 19.

Key Laboratory of Xinjiang Phytomedicine Resources of Ministry of Education, School of Pharmacy, Shihezi University, Shihezi 832002, China. Electronic address:

Real-time monitoring of drug metabolism in vivo is of great significance to drug development and toxicology research. The purpose of this study is to establish a rapid and visual in vivo detection method for the detection of an intermediate metabolite of the gold (I) drug. Gold (I) drugs such as sodium aurothiomalate (AuTM) have anti-inflammatory effects in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. Gold(III) ions (Au) are the intermediate metabolite of gold medicine, and they are also the leading factor of side effects in the treatment of patients. However, the rapid reduction of Au to Au by thiol proteins in organisms limits the in-depth study of metabolism of gold drugs in vivo. Here we describe a luminescence Au probe (RA) based on ruthenium (II) complex for detecting Au in vitro and in vivo. RA with large Stokes shift, good water solubility and biocompatibility was successfully applied to detect Au in living cells and vivo by luminescence imaging, and to trap the fluctuation of Au level produced by gold (I) medicine. More importantly, the luminescent probe was used to the detection of the intermediate metabolites of gold (I) drugs for the first time. Overall, this work offers a new detection tool/method for a deeper study of gold (I) drugs metabolite.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bioorg.2021.104749DOI Listing
February 2021

Electrochemical sensor based on molecularly imprinted polymer for sensitive and selective determination of metronidazole via two different approaches.

Anal Bioanal Chem 2016 Jun 21;408(16):4287-95. Epub 2016 Apr 21.

Key Laboratory of Xinjiang Phytomedicine Resources for Ministry of Education, School of Pharmacy, Shihezi University, Shihezi, 832000, China.

A molecularly imprinted polymer decorated glassy carbon electrode (MIP/GCE) is facilely developed into an electrochemical sensing platform for detection of metronidazole (MNZ). MIP preparation was carried out via in situ electropolymerization and o-phenylenediamine was selected as the optimal functional monomer. Cyclic voltammetry (CV) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) were employed to characterize and assess the performance of the so-obtained sensor. In particular, two assay methods, which are based on different principles, were involved in the detection procedure. One is based on MIP/catalysis (Method І) and the other is MIP/gate effect (Method II). Comparison of these two methods was made in the aspects including detection range, sensitivity, accuracy, selectivity, repeatability, and long-term stability. It is found that Method І affords a lower detection limit of 3.33 × 10(-10) M (S/N = 3) while the detection limit of Method II is 6.67 × 10(-10) M (S/N = 3). The linear range of Method І and II is 1.0 × 10(-9) to 1.0 × 10(-8) M and 2.0 × 10(-9) to 1.0 × 10(-7) M, respectively. The MIP/GCE exhibits good recognition ability towards the template molecule-MNZ in the presence of the analogues of MNZ and other interferents, which can be ascribed to the successful imprinting effect during MIP membrane preparation. Graphical Abstract Procedure for fabricating MIP/GCE and its application in detecting metronidazole in serum.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00216-016-9520-1DOI Listing
June 2016

A novel single nucleotide polymorphism within the NOD2 gene is associated with pulmonary tuberculosis in the Chinese Han, Uygur and Kazak populations.

BMC Infect Dis 2012 Apr 14;12:91. Epub 2012 Apr 14.

Institute of Cell Biology, Zhejiang University, 866 Yuhangtang Road, Hangzhou 310058, China.

Background: The present study aimed to investigate the genetic polymorphisms in exon 4 of the NOD2 gene in tuberculosis patients and healthy controls, in order to clarify whether polymorphisms in the NOD2 gene is associated with tuberculosis.

Methods: A case-control study was performed on the Chinese Han, Uygur and Kazak populations. Exon 4 of the NOD2 gene was sequenced in 425 TB patients and 380 healthy controls to identify SNPs.

Results: The frequency of T/G genotypes for the Arg587Arg (CGT → CGG) single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in NOD2 was found to be significantly higher in the Uygur (34.9%) and Kazak (37.1%) populations than the Han population (18.6%). Also, the frequency of G/G genotypes for the Arg587Arg SNP was significantly higher in the Uyghur (8.3%) and Kazak (5.4%) populations than the Han population (0.9%). Meanwhile, no significant difference was found in the Arg587Arg polymorphism between the tuberculosis patients and healthy controls in the Uyghur and Kazak populations (P > 0.05) whereas, a significant difference was observed in the Arg587Arg polymorphism between the tuberculosis patients and healthy controls in the Han population (P < 0.01). The odd ratio of 2.16 (95% CI = 1.31-3.58; P < 0.01) indicated that the Arg587Arg SNP in NOD2 may be associated with susceptibility to tuberculosis in the Chinese Han population.

Conclusions: Our study is the first to demonstrate that the Arg587Arg SNP in NOD2 is a new possible risk factor for tuberculosis in the Chinese Han population, but not in the Uyghur and Kazak populations. Our results may reflect racial differences in genetic susceptibility to tuberculosis.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1471-2334-12-91DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3379957PMC
April 2012