Publications by authors named "Xiaoyou Hong"

8 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Vasa expression is associated with sex differentiation in the Asian yellow pond turtle, Mauremys mutica.

J Exp Zool B Mol Dev Evol 2021 Jul 8;336(5):431-442. Epub 2021 Jun 8.

Key Laboratory of Tropical & Subtropical Fishery Resource Application & Cultivation of Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Affairs, Pearl River Fisheries Research Institute, Chinese Academy of Fishery Sciences, Guangzhou, China.

Vasa, one of the best-studied germ cell markers plays a critical role in germ cell development and differentiation in animals. Vasa deficiency would lead to male-specific sterility in most vertebrates, but female sterility in the fly. However, the role of the vasa gene involved in germ cell differentiation is largely elusive. Here, we first characterized the expression profile of vasa products in the Asian yellow pond turtle by quantitative reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction and fluorescence immunostaining. The results showed that vasa messenger RNA (mRNA) is initially detected in embryos at stage 16, and then dramatically increased in embryos at stage 19. In particular, like the sex-related genes, vasa mRNA exhibited differential expression in embryos between the male-producing temperature (MPT, 25°C) and the female-producing temperature (FPT, 33°C), whereas there was no difference in methylation levels of vasa promoter detected between FPT and MPT. In contrast, in the adult Asian yellow pond, the level of vasa mRNA was much higher in the testis than ovary. Moreover, the immunostaining on testicular sections and cells showed that Vasa protein was exclusively expressed in germ cells: Weak but detectable in spermatogonia, highest in spermatocytes, moderate and concentrated in chromatid bodies in spermatids and spermatozoa, and bare in somatic cells. The expression profile of Vasa protein is similar in turtle species studied so far but distinct from those in fish species in this study. The findings of this study would provide new insights into our understanding of the conservation and divergence of the vasa gene, even other germ cell genes across phyla.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jez.b.23064DOI Listing
July 2021

Complete mitochondrial genome and the phylogenetic position of the Burmese narrow-headed softshell turtle (Testudines: Trionychidae).

Mitochondrial DNA B Resour 2021 Mar 26;6(3):1216-1218. Epub 2021 Mar 26.

Key Laboratory of Tropical and Subtropical Fishery Resources Application and Cultivation, Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Affairs, Pearl River Fisheries Research Institute, Chinese Academy of Fishery Sciences, Guangzhou, China.

Narrow-headed softshell turtles constitute a group of critically endangered freshwater turtles that belong to the family Trionychidae. Here, we determine the complete mitogenome of the Burmese narrow-headed softshell turtle . The length of the mitochondrial genome was 16,614 bp, composed of 13 protein-coding genes, 22 tRNA genes, two rRNA genes, and twelve noncoding regions. The phylogenetic analysis strongly indicated that is closely related to . The mitochondrial genome will contribute to the genetic research and conservation of in the future.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/23802359.2021.1903350DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8008941PMC
March 2021

Comparative transcriptome analysis reveals the sexual dimorphic expression profiles of mRNAs and non-coding RNAs in the Asian yellow pond turtle (Meauremys mutica).

Gene 2020 Aug 7;750:144756. Epub 2020 May 7.

Key Laboratory of Tropical & Subtropical Fishery Resource Application & Cultivation of Ministry of Agriculture, Pearl River Fisheries Research Institute, Chinese Academy of Fishery Sciences, Guangzhou 510380, China. Electronic address:

Noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs), including long ncRNAs (lncRNAs), circular RNAs (circRNAs) and microRNAs (miRNAs) have been extensively studied in biological processes such as disease development, cell proliferation but remained unclear in sex differentiation in organisms. In this study, the transcriptome profiles were comparatively analyzed between male and female gonads in Mauremys mutica. A total of 8237 differentially expressed genes (DEGs), 9573 DE lncRNAs, 84 DE circRNAs and 665 DE miRNAs were identified between male and female gonads. Through gene Ontology (GO) and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) of the DE RNAs, it was revealed that the DE mRNAs were majorly involved in GO terms, such as 'reproduction', 'reproductive process' and the pathways of 'focal adhesion' and 'oocyte meiosis'. In addition, a co-expression network showed that the expression of gametogenesis and sex differentiation related genes, including dmrt3a, tdrd7, sox14, etc were closely associated with the levels of their corresponding ncRNAs. Intriguingly, the dmrt1 circRNA and its target mRNA were detected upregulated both in adult testis and male producing temperature (MPT) embryos. Our findings demonstrated the sexually dimorphic expression profiles of mRNAs and ncRNAs in turtle gonads, which will provide the index to find out the molecular mechanisms behind the sex differentiation in turtles, even in other environmental sex determination (ESD) species.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.gene.2020.144756DOI Listing
August 2020

Morphological characterization and phylogenetic relationships of Indochinese box turtles-The complex.

Ecol Evol 2019 Dec 2;9(23):13030-13042. Epub 2019 Oct 2.

Key Laboratory of Aquatic Genomics Ministry of Agriculture Key Laboratory of Tropical & Subtropical Fishery Resource Application & Cultivation of Ministry of Agriculture Pearl River Fisheries Research Institute Chinese Academy of Fishery Sciences Guangzhou China.

The members of the Indochinese box turtle complex, namely , , and , rank the most critically endangered turtle species on earth after more than three decades of over-harvesting for food, traditional Chinese medicine, and pet markets. Despite advances in molecular biology, species boundaries and phylogenetic relationships, the status of the .  complex remains unresolved due to the small number of specimens observed and collected in the field. In this study, we present analyses of morphologic characters as well as mitochondrial and nuclear DNA data to reconstruct the species boundaries and systematic relationships within the .  complex. Based on principal component analysis (PCA) and statistical analysis, we found that phenotypic traits partially overlapped among , , and , and that and might be only subspecifically distinct. Moreover, we used the mitochondrial genome, , and nuclear gene under the maximum likelihood criteria and Bayesian inference criteria to elucidate whether could be divided into three separate species or subspecies. We found strong support for a sister relationship between and the other two species, and consequently, we recommend maintaining as a full species, and classifying and as subspecies of . These findings provide evidence for a better understanding of the evolutionary histories of these critically endangered turtles.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ece3.5680DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6912918PMC
December 2019

Comparative study of two immunity-related GTPase genes in Chinese soft-shell turtle reveals their molecular characteristics and functional activity in immune defense.

Dev Comp Immunol 2018 04 14;81:63-73. Epub 2017 Nov 14.

College of Oceanography, Hohai University, Nanjing 210098, China. Electronic address:

The immunity-related GTPases (IRGs) are a family of proteins that play critical roles in innate resistance to intracellular pathogens. The number and diversity of IRG genes differ greatly in different species. Although IRG proteins have been well studies in mammals, they remain poorly characterized in lower vertebrates. In this study, we cloned two IRG genes, PsIRG5 and PsIRG8, from the Chinese soft-shelled turtle and compared their characterization and functional activity with mammalian IRGs. The PsIRG5 is a gene of 1896 bp that encodes a protein of 413 amino acid and PsIRG8 is 1543 bp in length encoding another 413 aa protein. Sequence alignment between all turtle IRG-like genes and mammalian IRGs showed that both PsIRG5 and PsIRG8 were conserved with mammalian GKS IRGs, while PsIRG5 appeared a closer evolutionary relationship with mammalian GMS IRGs. The expression and subcellular characterization revealed that PsIRG5 was dramatically upregulated under Aeromonas hydrophila challenge and exhibited co-localization with lysosomes in cells; whereas PsIRG8 was downregulated and has no distinct localization. Functional activity assay demonstrated that PsIRG5 plays a role in autophagy induction and IFN-γ contributes to enhance the induction, since it has IFN-inducible elements in its promoter region. These data above unravel the molecular characterization and functional activity of IRGs in lower vertebrate for the first time and will provide insights into the comparative immunity and evolutionary relationships of IRGs between mammals and reptiles.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.dci.2017.11.009DOI Listing
April 2018

Characterization and functional analysis of voltage-dependent anion channel 1 (VDAC1) from orange-spotted grouper (Epinephelus coioides).

J Biochem Mol Toxicol 2014 Jul 30;28(7):292-301. Epub 2014 May 30.

Key Laboratory of Tropical & Subtropical Fishery Resource Application & Cultivation, Ministry of Agriculture, Pearl River Fishery Research Institute, Chinese Academic of Fishery Sciences, Guangzhou, 510380, People's Republic of China.

The voltage-dependent anion channel (VDAC) is a highly conserved integral protein of mitochondria in different eukaryotic species. It forms a selective channel in the mitochondrial outer membrane that serves as the controlled pathway for small metabolites and ions. In this study, a VDAC gene, EcVDAC1, was isolated from orange-spotted grouper (Epinephelus coioides). The EcVDAC1 exhibits ubiquitous expression in various tissues of orange-spotted grouper and is upregulated in liver, gill, and spleen after stimulation with lipopolysaccharides (LPS). Subcellular localization analysis shows that the EcVDAC1 protein colocalized with the mitochondria. A caspase-3 assay demonstrates that overexpression of the EcVDAC1 induced apoptotic cell death in fathead minnow cells. The data presented in this study provide new information regarding the relationship between LPS and the EcVDAC1 gene, suggesting that the fish VDAC1 gene may play an important role in antibacterial immune response.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jbt.21565DOI Listing
July 2014

Two molecular markers based on mitochondrial genomes for varieties identification of the northern snakehead (Channa argus) and blotched snakehead (Channa maculata) and their reciprocal hybrids.

Mitochondrial DNA 2015 Aug 17;26(4):555-8. Epub 2014 Jan 17.

Key Laboratory of Tropical & Subtropical Fishery Resource Application & Cultivation of Ministry of Agriculture, Pearl River Fisheries Research Institute, Chinese Academy of Fishery Sciences , Guangzhou , PR China .

The northern snakehead (Channa argus) and blotched snakehead (Channa maculata) and their reciprocal hybrids have played important roles in the Chinese freshwater aquaculture industry, with an annual production in China exceeding 400 thousand tons. While these are popular aquaculture breeds in China, it is not easy to identify northern snakehead, blotched snakehead, and their hybrids. Thus, a method should be developed to identify these varieties. To distinguish between the reciprocal hybrids (C. argus ♀ × C. maculata ♂ and C. maculata ♀ × C. argus ♂), the mitochondrial genome sequences of northern snakehead and blotched snakehead and their reciprocal hybrids were compared. Following the alignment and analysis of mtDNA sequences of northern snakehead, blotched snakehead and their hybrids, two pairs of specific primers were designed based on identified differences ranging from 12S rRNA to 16S rRNA gene. The BY1 primers amplified the same bands in the blotched snakehead and the hybrid (C. maculata ♀ × C. argus ♂), while producing no products in northern snakehead and the hybrid (C. argus ♀ × C. maculata ♂). Amplification with WY1 yielded the opposite results. Then, 30 individuals per fish were randomized to verify the primers, and the results showed that the primers were specific for breeds, as intended. The specific primers can not only simply distinguish between two kinds of hybrids, but also rapidly identify the two parents. This study provides a method of molecular marker identification to identify reciprocal hybrids.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3109/19401736.2013.873893DOI Listing
August 2015

Comparison of the northern snakehead (Channa argus) and blotched snakehead (Channa maculata) and their reciprocal hybrids (C. maculata ♀ × C. argus ♂ and C. argus ♀ × C. maculata ♂) based on complete mitochondrial DNA sequences.

Mitochondrial DNA 2015 10;26(5):805-6. Epub 2014 Jan 10.

a Key Laboratory of Tropical and Subtropical Fishery Resource Application and Cultivation of Ministry of Agriculture , Pearl River Fisheries Research Institute, Chinese Academy of Fishery Sciences , Guangzhou , People's Republic of China and.

The complete mitochondrial DNA of Channa argus, Channa maculata, C. maculate ♀ × C. argus ♂ and C. argus ♀ × C. maculata ♂ were sequenced to characterize and compare their mitochondrial genomes. The lengths were 16,558, 16,559, 16,558 and 16,559 bp respectively. Start codon of 13 protein-coding genes was ATG, except that COI was GTG. The control region of the mitogenome were 907, 908, 907 and 908 bp in C. argus, C. maculata and their reciprocal hybrids (C. argus ♀ × C. maculata ♂ and C. maculate ♀ × C. argus ♂), respectively.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3109/19401736.2013.855902DOI Listing
June 2016
-->