Publications by authors named "Xiaolin Pang"

8 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Associations between clinical characteristics and tumor response to neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy in rectal cancer.

Cancer Med 2021 Jul 15;10(14):4832-4843. Epub 2021 Jun 15.

Department of Radiation Oncology, The Sixth Affiliated Hospital of Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou, China.

Following standard neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy and total mesorectal excision, some patients with locally advanced rectal cancer achieve good response (pathological T0-2N0), while others show nonresponse (pathological T3-4N0 or node-positive). To date, the clinicopathological predictors of good response and the necessity of adjuvant chemotherapy treatment (ACT) in good responders remain unclear. In this retrospective study, clinicopathological characteristics were surveyed to investigate the correlation with good response; furthermore, a propensity score matching (PSM) model was designed to balance the confounding factors between good responders treated with ACT or observation. A total of 2255 patients were enrolled, including 1069 good responders and 1186 nonresponders. The results of the survival analysis showed a good response predicted a better 3-year prognosis (p < 0.001). The logistic regression analysis showed less advanced T and N stages (T3 vs. T4; N0 vs. N1-2), more neoadjuvant chemotherapy (nCT) cycles (≥4 vs. 1-3), and delayed surgery (≥8 weeks vs. <8 weeks) were independent predictors of a good response (p < 0.05). Especially, patients treated with both more nCT cycles and a delay in surgery included the greatest number of good responders (p < 0.001). For good responders, after PSM (1:3), 235 observation cases were matched to 705 ACT cases. As compared with observation, ACT had no greater impact on prognosis analysis (p > 0.05). In conclusion, more cycles of nCT and a delay in surgery predicted a better response, and the delivery of ACT might be omitted in good responders.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/cam4.4051DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8290248PMC
July 2021

Association between adjuvant chemotherapy and survival in patients with rectal cancer and pathological complete response after neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy and resection.

Br J Cancer 2020 10 29;123(8):1244-1252. Epub 2020 Jul 29.

Department of Radiation Oncology, The Sixth Affiliated Hospital of Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, China.

Background: For patients with locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC), it is unclear whether neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy-induced pathologic complete response (pCR) individuals would further benefit from adjuvant chemotherapy (ACT).

Methods: The pCR individuals who received different ACT cycles were paired by propensity score matching. Overall survival (OS), disease-free survival (DFS), local recurrence-free survival (LRFS), and distant metastasis-free survival (DMFS) were calculated by Kaplan-Meier and log-rank test.

Results: In total, 1041 pCR individuals were identified from 5567 LARC cases. Specifically, 303 pCR cases had no ACT treatment, and 738 pCR patients received fluoropyrimidine-based ACT (median, 4 cycles) treatment. After 1:3 propensity score matching, 297 cases without ACT treatment were matched to 712 cases who received ACT treatment. Kaplan-Meier analysis showed that pCR individuals treated with or without ACT had the similar 3-year outcome (OS, DFS, LRFS and DMFS) (all P > 0.05). Moreover, the pCR patients received different ACT cycle(s) (0 vs. 1-4 cycles, 0 vs. ≥5 cycles) had comparable 3-year OS, DFS, LRFS and DMFS (all P > 0.05). In stratified analysis, ACT treatment did not improve 3-year survival (OS, DFS, LRFS and DMFS) for the baseline high-risk (cT3-4/cN1-2) subgroup patients (all P > 0.05).

Conclusion: ACT, which did not improve survival, is unnecessary to neoadjuvant treatment-induced pCR LARC patients.

Trial Registration: 2019ZSLYEC-136 (24-6-2019).
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41416-020-0989-1DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7553967PMC
October 2020

Distant Metastasis Risk Definition by Tumor Biomarkers Integrated Nomogram Approach for Locally Advanced Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma.

Cancer Control 2019 Jan-Dec;26(1):1073274819883895

Department of Radiation Oncology, The Sixth Affiliated Hospital, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, China.

Identifying metastasis remains a challenge for death control and tailored therapy for nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). Here, we addressed this by designing a nomogram-based Cox proportional regression model through integrating a panel of tumor biomarkers. A total of 147 locally patients with advanced NPC, derived from a randomized phase III clinical trial, were enrolled. We constructed the model by selecting the variables from 31 tumor biomarkers, including 6 pathological signaling pathway molecules and 3 Epstein-Barr virus-related serological variables. Through the least absolute shrinkage and selection operator (LASSO) Cox proportional regression analysis, a nomogram was designed to refine the metastasis risk of each NPC individuals. Using the LASSO Cox regression model, we constructed a 9 biomarkers-based prognostic nomogram: Beclin 1, Aurora-A, Cyclin D1, Ki-67, P27, Bcl-2, MMP-9, 14-3-3σ, and VCA-IgA. The time-dependence receiver operating characteristic analysis at 1, 3, and 5 years showed an appealing prognostic accuracy with the area under the curve of 0.830, 0.827, and 0.817, respectively. In the validation subset, the concordance index of this nomogram reached to 0.64 to identify the individual metastasis pattern. Supporting by this nomogram algorithm, the individual metastasis risk might be refined personally and potentially guiding the treatment decisions and target therapy against the related signaling pathways for patients with locally advanced NPC.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1073274819883895DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6811765PMC
May 2020

Molecular Decision Tree Algorithms Predict Individual Recurrence Pattern for Locally Advanced Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma.

J Cancer 2019 2;10(15):3323-3332. Epub 2019 Jun 2.

Department of Radiation Oncology, The Sixth Affiliated Hospital, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510655, China.

: Recurrence remains one of the key reasons of relapse after the radical radiation for locally advanced nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). Here, the multiple molecular and clinical variables integrated decision tree algorithms were designed to predict individual recurrence patterns (with VS without recurrence) for locally advanced NPC. : A total of 136 locally advanced NPC patients retrieved from a randomized controlled phase III trial, were included. For each patient, the expression levels of 33 clinicopathological biomarkers in tumor specimen, 3 Epstein-Barr virus related serological antibody titer and 5 clinicopathological variables, were detected and collected to construct the decision tree algorithm. The expression level of 33 clinicopathological biomarkers in tumor specimen was evaluated by immunohistochemistry staining. : Three algorithm classifiers, augmented by the adaptive boosting algorithm for variable selection and classification, were designed to predict individual recurrence pattern. The classifiers were trained in the training subset and further tested using a 10-fold cross-validation scheme in the validation subset. In total, 13 molecules expression level in tumor specimen, including AKT1, Aurora-A, Bax, Bcl-2, N-Cadherin, CENP-H, HIF-1α, LMP-1, C-Met, MMP-2, MMP-9, Pontin and Stathmin, and N stage were selected to construct three 10-fold cross-validation decision tree classifiers. These classifiers showed high predictive sensitivity (87.2-93.3%), specificity (69.0-100.0%), and overall accuracy (84.5-95.2%) to predict recurrence pattern individually. Multivariate analyses confirmed the decision tree classifier was an independent prognostic factor to predict individual recurrence (algorithm 1: hazard ration (HR) 0.07, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.03-0.16, < 0.01; algorithm 2: HR 0.13, 95% CI 0.04-0.44, < 0.01; algorithm 3: HR 0.13, 95% CI 0.03-0.68, = 0.02). : Multiple molecular and clinicopathological variables integrated decision tree algorithms may individually predict the recurrence pattern for locally advanced NPC. This decision tree algorism provides a potential tool to select patients with high recurrence risk for intensive follow-up, and to diagnose recurrence at an earlier stage for salvage treatment in the NPC endemic region.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.7150/jca.29693DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6603411PMC
June 2019

Impact of Chemotherapy Regimens on Normal Tissue Complication Probability Models of Acute Hematologic Toxicity in Rectal Cancer Patients Receiving Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy With Concurrent Chemotherapy From a Prospective Phase III Clinical Trial.

Front Oncol 2019 9;9:244. Epub 2019 Apr 9.

Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Colorectal and Pelvic Floor Diseases, Department of Radiation Oncology, Guangdong Institute of Gastroenterology, The Sixth Affiliated Hospital, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, China.

To determine whether there are differences in bone marrow tolerance to chemoradiotherapy (CRT) between two chemotherapy regimens according to FOWARC protocol and how chemotherapy regimens affect radiation dose parameters and normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) modelings that correlate with acute hematologic toxicity (HT) in rectal cancer patients treated with intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and concurrent chemotherapy. One hundred and twenty-eight rectal cancer patients who received IMRT from a single institution were recruited from Chinese FOWARC multicenter, open-label, randomized phase III trial. We assessed HT in these patients who were separated into two groups: Oxaliplatin (L-OHP) + 5- fluorouracil (5FU) (FOLFOX, 70 of 128) and 5FU (58 of 128). The pelvic bone marrow (PBM) was divided into three subsites: lumbosacral spine (LSS), ilium (I), and lower pelvic (LP). The endpoint for HT was grade ≥3 (HT3+) and grade ≥2 (HT2+) leukopenia, neutropenia, anemia and thrombocytopenia. Logistic regression was used to analyze the association between HT2+/HT3+ and dosimetric parameters. Lyman-Kutcher-Burman (LKB) model was used to calculate NTCP. Sixty-eight patients experienced HT2+: 22 of 58 (37.9%) 5FU and 46 of 70 (65.7%) FOLFOX ( = 0.008), while twenty-six patients experienced HT3+: 4 of 58 (6.9%) 5FU and 22 of 70 (31.4%) FOLFOX ( = 0.016). PBM and LP dosimetric parameters were correlated with HT2+ in the 5FU group but not in the FOLFOX group. No PBM dosimetric parameters were correlated with HT3+ in both groups. For PBM, NTCP at HT3+ was 0.32 in FOLFOX group relative to 0.10 in 5FU subset ( < 0.05). Patients receiving FOLFOX have lower BM tolerance to CRT than those receiving 5FU. Low-dose radiation to the PBM is predictive for HT2+ in patients who received 5FU. NTCP modeling in FOLFOX group predicts much higher risk of HT3+ than 5FU group.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fonc.2019.00244DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6465593PMC
April 2019

Role of miR-145 in chronic constriction injury in rats.

Exp Ther Med 2016 Dec 14;12(6):4121-4127. Epub 2016 Nov 14.

Department of Anesthesiology, First Hospital of Tsinghua University, Beijing 100016, P.R. China.

The present study aims to investigate the effects and underlying mechanisms of miRNA-145 (miR-145) in rat models of chronic constriction injury (CCI). Rats were randomly divided into control, sham, CCI, agomiRNA (agomiR)-normal control (NC) and agomiR-145 groups (n=25 in each group); in addition, 30 rats with CCI were divided into small hairpin (sh)RNA-NC and shRNA-ras responsive element binding protein 1 (RREB1) groups. Paw withdrawal thermal latency (PWTL) and paw withdrawal mechanical threshold (PWMT) were detected. Reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction was used to detect miR-145 expression levels, and western blotting was performed to measure RREB1 and phosphorylated-protein kinase B (p-AKT) expression levels. In addition, a dual luciferase reporter assay was conducted to identify the target gene of miR-145. PWMT and PWTL were decreased in CCI rats and this decrease was alleviated by miR-145 injection. At 1, 3, 5 and 7 days after CCI, miR-145 expression level in the spinal cord tissue of rats in the CCI group was significantly decreased compared with 1 day before CCI (P<0.05). Compared with the CCI group, miR-145 expression level in the agomiR-145 group was significantly higher (P<0.05). In addition, expression levels of RREB1 and p-AKT were significantly increased in the CCI group and significantly decreased in the agomiR-145 group (P<0.05). Furthermore, knockdown of RREB1 expression by shRNA-RREB1 significantly increased values of PWMT and PWTL, decreased expression levels of RREB1 and p-AKT, and increased miR-145 expression levels (P<0.05). Further investigation demonstrated that miR-145 can bind with RREB1 mRNA. In conclusion, miR-145 may be involved in the development of CCI through regulating the expression of RREB1.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3892/etm.2016.3900DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5228344PMC
December 2016

Effects of abhydrolase domain containing 5 gene (ABHD5) expression and variations on chicken fat metabolism.

Poult Sci 2016 Jan 14;95(1):99-107. Epub 2015 Nov 14.

Department of Animal Genetics, Breeding and Reproduction, College of Animal Science, South China Agricultural University, Guangzhou 510642, Guangdong, China Guangdong Provincial Key Lab of Agro-Animal Genomics and Molecular Breeding and Key Laboratory of Chicken Genetics, Breeding and Reproduction, Ministry of Agriculture, Guangzhou 510642, Guangdong, China.

Abhydrolase domain containing 5 gene (ABHD5), also known as comparative gene identification 58 (CGI-58), is a member of the α/β-hydrolase family as a protein cofactor of ATGL stimulating its triacylglycerol hydrolase activity. In this study, we aim to characterize the expression and variations of ABHD5 and to study their functions in chicken fat metabolism. We compared the ABHD5 expression level in various tissues and under different nutrition conditions, identified the variations of ABHD5, and associated them with production traits in an F2 resource population of chickens. Overexpression analysis with two different genotypes and siRNA interfering analysis of ABHD5 were performed in chicken preadipocytes. Chicken ABDH5 was expressed widely and most predominantly in adipose tissue. Five SNPs of the ABHD5 gene were identified and genotyped in the F2 resource population. The c.490C > T SNP was associated with subcutaneous fat thickness (P < 0.01), carcass weight (P < 0.05), body weight (P < 0.05), shank diameter (P < 0.05), and shank length (P < 0.05). The c.423T > C SNP was also associated with chicken body weight (P < 0.05) and shank diameter (P < 0.05). In chicken preadipocytes, overexpression of wild type ABDH5 did not affect the mRNA level of ATGL (adipose triglyceride lipase) but markedly decreased (P < 0.05) the TG (triglyceride) content of the cell, whereas overexpression of mutation type ABHD5 did not affect either ATGL expression or TG content of the cell. The expression of ATGL and TG content of the cell were decreased (P < 0.05) after ABHD5 knockdown in preadipocytes. The mRNA level of ABHD5 was regulated by both feeding and fasting, and by consumption of a high fat diet. It was increased greatly by fasting (P < 0.05) and was returned to control levels after re-feeding in the adipose tissues, and down-regulated in abdominal fat (P < 0.05) and the liver (P < 0.01) of chickens with a high fat diet. These results suggest that expression and variations of ABHD5 may affect fat metabolism through regulating the activity of ATGL in chickens.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3382/ps/pev315DOI Listing
January 2016
-->