Publications by authors named "Xiaogang Yu"

12 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Long-term low-dose oxytetracycline potentially leads to neurobehavioural changes.

Ecotoxicol Environ Saf 2021 Oct 27;223:112546. Epub 2021 Jul 27.

Department of Infectious Disease, Xinhua Children's Hospital, Xinhua Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai 200092, China. Electronic address:

Trace levels of oxytetracycline (OTC)-a veterinary antibiotic and feed additive-are widespread in the environment. Studies revealed that OTC potentially impairs thyroid function, which may affect neurobehaviour; however, the impact of exposure to environmental concentrations of OTC on adult neurobehaviour is unknown. In this study, the effects of OTC on zebrafish after 30-day exposure were investigated. The total swimming distance was significantly increased under vibration and light/dark stimulation, while time spent in the white area was prolonged during the black/white preference test, indicating that the zebrafish became bolder and more impulsive under low OTC exposure. Additionally, monoamine neurotransmitter (5-hydroxytryptamine, dopamine, norepinephrine) levels were decreased and gene expression of monoamine oxidase (mao) involved in neurotransmitter metabolism was upregulated at the transcription level after OTC exposure. Because triiodothyronine (T3) levels were enhanced following exposure to OTC, we speculated that T3 may mediate OTC damage to the nervous system. Our simulated molecular docking analysis showed that OTC combined with the sodium iodide cotransporter protein may result in excessive T3 synthesis. We further exposed zebrafish to T3, and they exhibited similar behaviour to the OTC exposure group. In conclusion, environmental OTC may activate monoamine oxidase and enhance the metabolism of monoaminergic neurotransmitters via T3, thereby inducing abnormal neurobehaviour.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ecoenv.2021.112546DOI Listing
October 2021

Long non‑coding RNA BANCR promotes proliferation, invasion and migration in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma cells via the Raf/MEK/ERK signaling pathway.

Mol Med Rep 2021 06 21;23(6). Epub 2021 Apr 21.

Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Affiliated Hospital of North Sichuan Medical College, Nanchong, Sichuan 637000, P.R. China.

Esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) is a major histological type of esophageal cancer, identified as a leading cause of tumor‑associated death worldwide. In addition, long non‑coding RNA (lncRNA) BRAF‑activated non‑coding RNA (BANCR) expression is increased in the plasma of patients with ESCC, which can be reversed by tumor resection. Thus, the aim of the present study was to investigate the underlying mechanism of BANCR in ESCC progression. The relative mRNA expression of BANCR was determined via reverse transcription‑quantitative PCR. The cell behaviors of Eca‑109 cells were detected using Cell Counting Kit‑8, colony formation, wound healing and Transwell chamber assays. Finally, the expression levels of proteins involved in the Raf/MEK/ERK signaling pathway and cell metastasis were analyzed with western blotting. The results revealed that lncRNA BANCR was highly expressed in ESCC cells compared with in normal esophageal cells. BANCR overexpression enhanced proliferation, migration and invasion of ESCC cells, and BANCR silencing exerted opposite effects. Moreover, BANCR overexpression induced activation of the Raf/MEK/ERK signaling pathway in ESCC cells. Notably, U0126, a specific MEK inhibitor, decreased MEK and ERK expression, and blocked the promotive effects of BANCR overexpression on the proliferation, migration and invasion of ESCC cells. Overall, lncRNA BANCR facilitated the proliferation, migration and invasion of ESCC cells via the Raf/MEK/ERK signaling pathway. Thus, lncRNA BANCR may be a promising target for inhibiting ESCC growth and metastasis.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3892/mmr.2021.12104DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8097753PMC
June 2021

Low-dose effects on thyroid disruption in zebrafish by long-term exposure to oxytetracycline.

Aquat Toxicol 2020 Oct 20;227:105608. Epub 2020 Aug 20.

Department of Pediatrics, Xinhua Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, School of Medicine, Shanghai, China. Electronic address:

As a feed additive in agriculture, the antibiotic oxytetracycline (OTC) has become widely distributed in the natural environment, leading to the exposure of many organisms to low doses of OTC. Although OTC is clinically contraindicated in children because of its multiple side effects, the effect of exposure to low doses of environmental OTC on children is unknown, particularly during development. In this study, we investigated the effects of OTC on the thyroid endocrine system in zebrafish, through determinations of the whole-body contents of triiodothyronine (T3), thyroxine (T4), and thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and analysis of the mRNA expression of regulatory genes involved in the hypothalamus-pituitary-thyroid (HPT) axis using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. Zebrafish embryos were exposed to OTC at environmentally relevant concentrations from 2 h to 120 days post-fertilisation. After exposure to OTC at 1,000 and 5,000 ng/L, T3 contents were significantly enhanced (37.8% and 45.1%, respectively) and TSH contents were reduced (16% and 16.3%, respectively) compared with those in the controls. The OTC-driven increase in the transcription of genes involved in thyroid synthesis (tpo and nis) may be responsible for the altered T3 levels. These data indicate that OTC may cause thyroid dysfunction and lead to reduced TSH secretion owing to enhanced negative feedback control of the HPT axis. Meanwhile, a decrease in body length, weight, and BMI and an increase in heart rate were observed with increasing OTC exposure. In conclusion, our results indicate that long-term exposure to low concentrations of OTC may alter the transcription of key genes involved in the HPT axis, as well as T3 and TSH contents, thereby disrupting the thyroid system and affecting the growth and development of zebrafish.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.aquatox.2020.105608DOI Listing
October 2020

Photoelectrocatalytic Reduction of CO to Paraffin Using p-n Heterojunctions.

iScience 2020 Jan 12;23(1):100768. Epub 2019 Dec 12.

State Key Laboratory of Applied Organic Chemistry, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000, China; State Key Laboratory of Coal Conversion, Institute of Coal Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Taiyuan 030001, China. Electronic address:

Nowadays, photoelectrocatalytic (PEC) reduction of CO represents a very promising solution for storing solar energy in value-added chemicals, but so far it has been hampered by the lack of highly efficient catalyst of photocathode. Enlightened by the Calvin cycle of plants, here we show that a series of three-dimensional C/N-doped heterojunctions of Zn:[email protected] are successfully fabricated and applied as photocathodes in the PEC reduction of CO to generate paraffin product. These materials integrate semiconductors of p-type CoO and n-type ZnO on Cu foam to construct fine heterojunctions with multiple active sites, which result in excellent C-C coupling control in reduction of CO. The best catalyst of Zn:[email protected] yields paraffin at a rate of 325 μg·h under -0.4 V versus saturated calomel electrode without H release. The apparent quantum efficiency of PEC cell is up to 1.95%.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.isci.2019.100768DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6941872PMC
January 2020

The efficacy of Tung's acupuncture for sex hormones in polycystic ovary syndrome: A randomized controlled trial.

Complement Ther Med 2019 Jun 24;44:182-188. Epub 2019 Apr 24.

Guang'anmen Hospital, China Academy of Chinese Medical Sciences, Beijing, China. Electronic address:

Background: Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a common and heterogeneous endocrine disorder in reproductive-age women. Tung's acupuncture, a Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) treatment, is widely used for PCOS in East Asia, but evidence on its efficacy is rare. The aim of this RCT study was to examine whether the Tung's acupuncture could be a complementary treatment method for PCOS.

Methods: A total of 60 PCOS patients were randomly assigned to a Tung's acupuncture group (n = 30) or a cyproterone acetate/ethinylestradiol (CPA/EE) group (n = 30). Each participant received treatments for 12 weeks to assess the short-term treatment efficacy and then followed up for another 12 weeks to assess the long-term treatment efficacy. The primary outcome examined was change in the ratio of luteinizing hormone (LH) to follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH); the secondary outcomes examined were changes in body mass index (BMI), LH, FSH, total testosterone (TT), ovarian volume, polycystic ovary number and menstrual frequency.

Results: Both groups showed significant reductions in the LH/FSH ratio, LH and TT after 12-week treatment (p < 0.001) and 12-week follow-up (p < 0.05). No significant differences existed between the two groups (p > 0.05). Both groups showed significant improvement in BMI, menstrual frequency and polycystic ovary number after 12-week treatment (p < 0.05).

Conclusion: Compared with CPA/EE, Tung's acupuncture showed no better improvement on LH/FSH ratio for PCOS although it could reduce the ratio. Tung's acupuncture might have some effect on long-term weight control and menstruation frequency. Further studies addressing this study's limitations are recommended.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ctim.2019.04.016DOI Listing
June 2019

Environmental Exposure to Triclosan and Semen Quality.

Int J Environ Res Public Health 2016 Feb 17;13(2):224. Epub 2016 Feb 17.

School of Public Health, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai 200025, China.

Triclosan (2,4,4'-trichloro-2'-hydroxy-diphenyl ether, TCS) is widely used in personal care, household, veterinary and industrial products. It was considered as a potential male reproductive toxicant in previous in vitro and in vivo studies. However, evidence from human studies is scarce. Our study aims to investigate the relationship between TCS exposure and semen quality. We measured urinary TCS concentrations in 471 men recruited from a male reproductive health clinic. TCS was detected in 96.7% of urine samples, with a median concentration of 0.97 ng (mg·creatinine)(-1) (interquartile range, 0.41-2.95 ng (mg·creatinine)(-1)). A multiple linear regression analysis showed a negative association between natural logarithm (Ln) transformed TCS concentration (Ln-TCS) and Ln transformed number of forward moving sperms (adjusted coefficient β = -0.17; 95% confidence interval (CI) (-0.32, -0.02). Furthermore, among those with the lowest tertile of TCS level, Ln-TCS was negatively associated with the number of forward moving sperms (β = -0.35; 95% CI (-0.68, -0.03)), percentage of sperms with normal morphology (β = -1.64; 95% CI (-3.05, -0.23)), as well as number of normal morphological sperms, sperm concentration and count. Our findings suggest that the adverse effect of TCS on semen quality is modest at the environment-relevant dose in humans. Further studies are needed to confirm our findings.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/ijerph13020224DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4772244PMC
February 2016

Effects of maternal mild zinc deficiency and different ways of zinc supplementation for offspring on learning and memory.

Food Nutr Res 2016 29;60:29467. Epub 2016 Jan 29.

MOE-Shanghai Key Laboratory of Children's Environmental Health, Xinhua Hospital affiliated to Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai, China;

Background: The effect of different ways of zinc supplementation on spatial learning and memory remains unclear.

Objectives: This study aims to assess the effectiveness of two ways of zinc supplementation - oral use and intravenous transfusion - in zinc-deficient offspring rats on learning and memory.

Design: Rats were randomly divided into six groups on the first day of pregnancy (n=12): control (CO), pair fed (PF), zinc deprived (ZD), oral zinc supplementation (OZS), injection zinc supplementation (IZS), and injection control. The offspring's spatial learning and memory were tested at postnatal day 35 using Morris water maze (MWM). Maternal rats' serum zinc was measured at postnatal day 21, while pups' serum zinc was measured at postnatal day 35.

Results: Compared with the CO and PF groups, pups in ZD group spent more time finding the latent platform and swam longer distances (p<0.05). Compared with ZD groups, pups in OZS group significantly decreased the time used for finding the platform and the swimming distance (p<0.05) and were similar to that of CO and PF groups (p>0.05). However, compared with ZD groups, pups in IZS did not show any improvement in the indexes of MWM (p>0.05) although their zinc serum concentration increased significantly (p<0.05).

Conclusions: These results indicate that mild zinc deficiency during pregnancy and lactation leads to the impairment of learning and memory function in offspring, and that OZS, instead of intravenous transfusion zinc supplementation, can recover the impairment of spatial learning and memory function.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4734033PMC
http://dx.doi.org/10.3402/fnr.v60.29467DOI Listing
February 2016

Disruption of calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II α/brain-derived neurotrophic factor (α-CaMKII/BDNF) signalling is associated with zinc deficiency-induced impairments in cognitive and synaptic plasticity.

Br J Nutr 2013 Dec 3;110(12):2194-200. Epub 2013 Jul 3.

MOE-Shanghai Key Laboratory of Children's Environmental Health, XinHua Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, 1665 Kong Jiang Road, Shanghai 200092, People's Republic of China.

Maternal dietary Zn deficiency during fetal development induces substantial cognitive dysfunctions in the resultant offspring. The mechanism underlying this effect is unclear. The present study evaluated whether the impairments caused by gestational and lactational Zn deficiency are mediated by the hippocampal calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II α (α-CaMKII)/brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) signalling pathway as well as whether they can be restored by postnatal Zn supplementation. Rats were randomly divided into four groups on the first day of pregnancy (n 12): control (CO) group; pair-fed (PF) group; Zn-deprived (ZD) group; orally Zn-supplemented group. The spatial memory of the offspring was tested at postnatal day 35 using the Morris water maze. Long-term potentiation (LTP) in the rat hippocampal medial perforant path-dentate gyrus pathway was evaluated simultaneously, and α-CaMKII and BDNF protein levels were examined by Western blot analysis. The results demonstrated that the ZD group exhibited a significantly longer latency period in the Morris water maze as well as a significantly decreased LTP amplitude compared with the CO and PF groups. α-CaMKII and BDNF protein expression in the hippocampus was significantly reduced in the ZD group. Postnatal Zn supplementation restored the cognitive dysfunction induced by gestational Zn deficiency but could not completely reverse the decreased LTP and α-CaMKII/BDNF protein levels. Our findings suggest that the α-CaMKII/BDNF signalling pathway may be involved in Zn deficiency-induced cognitive and synaptic impairments.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S0007114513001657DOI Listing
December 2013

Effects of maternal mild zinc deficiency and zinc supplementation in offspring on spatial memory and hippocampal neuronal ultrastructural changes.

Nutrition 2013 Feb;29(2):457-61

MOE-Shanghai Key Laboratory of Children's Environmental Health, Shanghai Institute for Pediatric Research, XinHua Hospital Affiliated to Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai, China.

Objective: Knowledge about the hippocampal morphologic mechanisms of learning and memory for maternal mild zinc deficiency during pregnancy/lactation followed by zinc supplementation of pups after weaning is limited. This study examined the effects of zinc deficiency and zinc supplementation on cognition and hippocampal neurons.

Methods: One-day pregnant rats were randomly divided into four groups (n = 12): control (CO), pair-fed (PF), zinc-deprived (ZD), and oral zinc-supplemented (OZS). The CO and PF groups were fed a control diet (zinc 25 μg/g diet), and the others were fed a mildly zinc-deficient diet (zinc 2 μg/g diet) during pregnancy and lactation. After weaning (day 21), offspring in the OZS group were switched to a control diet. After 35 d, the behavioral function of the offspring was tested with the Morris water maze test. The ultrastructure of the hippocampal CA3 area was observed under a transmission electron microscope.

Results: Compared with the CO and PF groups, rats in the ZD group spent more time finding the latent platform and swam longer distances (P < 0.05). The time used finding the platform and the swimming distance in the OZS group were similar to those in the CO and PF groups (P > 0.05). In addition, apoptotic neuronal changes in the hippocampus were observed in the ZD group, whereas the reversal of neuronal morphologic changes was observed in the OZS group.

Conclusion: The changes in hippocampal neuron morphology were consistent with the changes in the learning and memory ability of mildly zinc-deficient and zinc-supplemented offspring.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.nut.2012.09.002DOI Listing
February 2013

Elevated cord serum manganese level is associated with a neonatal high ponderal index.

Environ Res 2013 Feb 17;121:79-83. Epub 2012 Nov 17.

MOE-Shanghai Key Lab of Children's Environmental Health, XinHua Hospital affiliated to Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, 1665 Kong Jiang Road, Shanghai 200092, China.

Background: The effects of low-level prenatal manganese (Mn) exposure on neonatal growth remain unclear. The level of fetal Mn that may be considered "safe" has never been examined.

Methods: A multicenter study including 1377 mother-infant pairs was conducted from 2008 through 2009 in Shanghai. Mn concentrations were determined for both the cord and maternal serum, as well as neonatal birth weight and birth length. The ponderal index (PI) was calculated as (birth weight g/birth length cm(3))×100, and a ponderal index ≥3.17 was defined as a high ponderal index (HPI).

Results: The median serum Mn concentration was 4.0μg/L in the cord blood, and was 2.8μg/L in maternal blood. Of 1377 infants, 135 (9.8%) had a HPI. After adjusting for potential confounders, cord serum Mn was not associated with birth weight. However, there was a linear relationship between the cord serum Mn and the birth length (adjusted ß=-0.5, 95% CI=-0.7 to -0.2, p<0.0001). Additionally, a nonlinear relationship was observed between the cord serum Mn and the ponderal index, and between the cord serum Mn and HPI. The ponderal index and the prevalence of HPI increased with Mn levels above 5.0μg/L (Log Mn ≥0.7). A high level of Mn in the cord (≥5.0μg/L) was associated with a higher ponderal index (adjusted ß=0.2, 95% CI=0.1 to 0.2, p<0.001) and a high risk of HPI (adjusted OR=3.3, 95% CI=1.8-6.0, p<0.001).

Conclusions: Higher prenatal Mn exposure, even at a low level, is associated with a higher prevalence of HPI in a nonlinear pattern. Cord serum Mn levels less than 5.0μg/L may be considered safe with respect to neonatal ponderal index assessment.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.envres.2012.11.002DOI Listing
February 2013

Metal element excretion in 24-h urine in patients with Wilson disease under treatment of D-penicillamine.

Biol Trace Elem Res 2012 May 11;146(2):154-9. Epub 2011 Nov 11.

Department of Pediatrics, XinHua Hospital affiliated to Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, 1665 Kongjiang Road, Shanghai, China.

Wilson disease is an inherited autosomal recessive disorder causing copper accumulation and consequent toxicity. D-Penicillamine, a potent metal chelator, is an important therapy for Wilson disease. To investigate the changes of metal elements under the treatment of D-penicillamine, we determined the levels of Cu, Zn, Mg, Ca, Fe, Se, Mn, Pb, Hg, Cd, As, Tl, and Al by ICP-MS in 24-h urine of 115 Wilson disease patients who had received treatment with D: -penicillamine for 1 month to 22 years at maintenance doses, as well as 115 age-matched, healthy controls. The levels of Cu, Mg, Ca, Zn, Hg, Pb, Tl, Cd, and Mn in the 24-h urine of the cases were significantly higher than those of the controls (P < 0.05), and the observed increases in the levels of Mg, Ca, and Zn were directly correlated with the treatment duration with Pearson Correlation Coefficient (R) of 0.356 (Mg), 0.329 (Ca), and 0.313 (Zn), respectively (P < 0.05). On the other hand, the levels of Al and As in the 24-h urine were lower than those of the controls (P < 0.05) and were negatively correlated with the treatment time with R of -0.337 (Al) and -0.398 (As), respectively, (P < 0.05). Thus, this study indicates that the levels of metal elements may be altered in patients with Wilson disease under the treatment of D-penicillamine.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12011-011-9250-3DOI Listing
May 2012

Verification of a non-contact vital sign monitoring system using an infant simulator.

Annu Int Conf IEEE Eng Med Biol Soc 2009 ;2009:4836-9

Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Florida, USA.

In this paper, experimental result using a 5.8 GHz Doppler radar to monitor the variations of vital signs of an infant simulator under different medical conditions is presented. The infant simulator can mimic cardiovascular derangements seen in critically ill infants. The result demonstrates the system is capable of tracking a majority of the changes in heart rate and respiratory rate. Analysis suggests possible techniques for further improvement, such as direct coupling circuit, carrier frequency tuning and spectral analysis.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/IEMBS.2009.5332668DOI Listing
March 2010
-->