Publications by authors named "Xavier Struillou"

26 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Combination of bone substitutes and vectors in periodontology and implantology: A systematic review.

Dent Mater J 2021 Jun 12. Epub 2021 Jun 12.

Department of Periodontology, Faculty of Dental Surgery, University of Nantes.

The aim of the systematic review was to analyze the use of combination of bone substitutes and vectors in periodontology and implantology among animals models and humans. Electronic databases were searched, and additional hand search was performed. The research strategy was achieved according to the PRISMA guidelines. The including criteria were: combination of bone substitutes and vectors, in vivo studies, a precise number of specimens, histological and radiographic analysis, written in English. The risk of bias was evaluated for individual studies. Thirty-two articles were selected and investigated in this systematic review. The results do not show a superiority of the use of composite biomaterial in comparison with simple biomaterial but suggest the efficacity of their utilization as a carrier of bioactive agents. Future studies need to identify the suitable association of bone substitutes and vectors and explore interest in their use such as the support of growth factors.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.4012/dmj.2020-361DOI Listing
June 2021

Periodontal Diseases and Adverse Pregnancy Outcomes: Review of Two Decades of Clinical Research.

Oral Health Prev Dent 2021 ;19(1):77-83

Purpose: The aim of this study was to review the literature and chart the clinical studies that have focused on periodontal diseases and adverse pregnancy outcomes since 1996. Materials and Methods: Medline, Cinahl, and Cochrane databases were searched for original studies focused on pregnancy outcomes and periodontal status in humans. The most recent search was conducted on April 30, 2020. Results: Of the 633 articles identified, 232 articles (n = 119,774 participants) were selected for analysis. The majority of studies highlighted a statistically significant association between periodontal diseases and preterm birth (71 of 111 articles; 63.96%), low birth weight (46 of 64 articles; 71.87%), preterm low birth weight (29 of 49 articles; 59.18%), preeclampsia (31 of 45 articles; 68.89%) and other pregnancy complications, such as preterm, prelabor rupture of membranes (17 of 26 articles; 65.38%). Geographical analysis revealed that clinical studies were conducted in 51 countries, primarily in the United States (42 studies, 18.10%), Brazil (33 studies, 14.22%) and India (25 studies, 10.78%). Irrespective of geographical location, analysis showed various degrees of evidence of a relationship between periodontal diseases and adverse pregnancy outcomes. Conclusion: The majority of the studies found a statistically significant link between periodontal diseases and some complications of pregnancy. The strength of such a link varies according to type of study, type of variable and outcome measure selected.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3290/j.ohpd.b898969DOI Listing
January 2021

Effect of Reinforced Oral Hygiene on Periodontally Healthy Dental Students: A Four-year Follow-up Clinical Trial.

Oral Health Prev Dent 2020 10 27;18(1):945-951. Epub 2020 Oct 27.

Purpose: In periodontally healthy individuals, mean crevicular depth ranges from 1 to 3 mm. This depth threshold has been used as an indicator to differentiate a physiological dentoalveolar sulcus from a periodontal pocket needing further treatment. Because many studies have shown the important contribution of oral hygiene status to periodontal health, the purpose of this study was to explore the clinical effect of reinforced oral hygiene on the periodontal status of periodontitis-free dental students.

Materials And Methods: In our longitudinal observational clinical study, we assessed the periodontal status of healthy individuals attending the dental school by measuring the periodontal pocket depth, bleeding on probing, and plaque index. The follow-up reassessment was carried out four years later at the end of the dental curriculum.

Results: The study showed that oral hygiene improvement led to a slight but significant reduction in the mean sulcus depth (-0.049 mm; p<0.0001).

Conclusions: Reinforcement of oral hygiene contributes to the reduction of probing depth even in periodontally healthy patients.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3290/j.ohpd.a45434DOI Listing
October 2020

Periodontal pockets: A potential reservoir for SARS-CoV-2?

Med Hypotheses 2020 Oct 30;143:109907. Epub 2020 May 30.

Department of Periodontology (Rmes U1229, UIC 11), Faculty of Dental Surgery, University of Nantes (CHU de Nantes), Nantes, France. Electronic address:

Periodontal pockets are the major clinical manifestation of Periodontitis, a chronic inflammatory oral disease affecting the teeth-supporting tissues and has high prevalence in the adult population. Periodontal pockets are ideal environments for subgingival bacterial biofilms, that interact with the supragingival oral cavity, mucosal tissues of the pocket and a peripheral circulatory system. Periodontal pockets have been found to harbor viral species such as the Herpes simplex viruses' family. Recently, the SARS-CoV-2 has gained major interest of the scientific/medical community as it caused a global pandemic (Covid-19) and paralyzed the globe with high figures of infected people worldwide. This virus behavior is still partially understood, and by analyzing some of its features we hypothesized that periodontal pocket could be a favorable anatomical niche for the virus and thus acting as a reservoir for SARS-CoV-2.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.mehy.2020.109907DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7833827PMC
October 2020

Periodontal Diseases and Age-Related Macular Degeneration: Is There a Link? A Review.

Perm J 2019 25;23. Epub 2019 Oct 25.

Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Nantes, France.

Background: Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) induces irreversible loss of vision in older people. The exact physiopathology remains unclear, but numerous studies highlight the role of inflammation and multiple risk factors. Recent data show an altered periodontal condition subject to AMD. Periodontal diseases lead to the destruction of tooth-supporting tissues, mainly caused by the periodontal infection inducing a chronic inflammation. Periodontal diseases are known to be associated with several extraoral diseases such as diabetes, polyarthritis (rheumatoid arthritis), cardiovascular disease, and preeclampsia.

Objectives: To assess emerging evidence suggesting an association between periodontitis and AMD.

Methods: To support this review, we performed a literature search using PubMed, Cochrane, and Google Scholar databases, completed by manual searches in periodontology journals. We included only the original studies published before July 2017 reporting data on periodontal diseases and AMD. No restrictions were made on the language.

Results: Persons with AMD showed more periodontal diseases, fewer teeth, and more alveolar bone loss than those without AMD. Also, a significant association was observed between periodontal diseases and AMD, but only in the youngest individuals studied.

Conclusion: According to the studies included in this review, periodontal disease may be a plausible risk factor for AMD and may have a potential role in the earlier stages of this eye disease. Further studies should be encouraged for better understanding of this potential new relationship.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.7812/TPP/18.260DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6836525PMC
August 2020

Periodontal regenerative medicine using mesenchymal stem cells and biomaterials: A systematic review of pre-clinical studies.

Dent Mater J 2019 Dec 11;38(6):867-883. Epub 2019 Sep 11.

Inserm, UMR 1229, RMeS, Regenerative Medicine and Skeleton, University of Nantes.

The aim of the systematic review was to analyze the use of mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) and biomaterial for periodontal regeneration from preclinical animal models and human. Electronic databases were searched and additional hand-search in leading journals was performed. The research strategy was achieved according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guidelines. The including criteria were as follows: MSC, biomaterial, in vivo studies, with histologic and radiologic analysis and written in English. The risk of bias was assessed for individual studies. A total of 50 articles were selected and investigated in the systematic review. These results indicate that MSC and scaffold provide beneficial effects on periodontal regeneration, with no adverse effects of such interventions. Future studies need to identify the suitable association of MSC and biomaterial and to characterize the type of new cementum and the organization of the periodontal ligament fiber regeneration.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.4012/dmj.2018-315DOI Listing
December 2019

Role of good oral hygiene on clinical evolution of rheumatoid arthritis: a randomized study nested in the ESPOIR cohort.

Rheumatology (Oxford) 2020 05;59(5):988-996

Department of Periodontology, Service of Odontology, Rothschild Hospital, AP-HP, Denis Diderot University.

Objective: There is a relationship between RA and periodontal disease. We aimed to investigate if a good oral hygiene could improve activity of RA.

Methods: The patients with RA according to ACR/EULAR 2010 criteria and included in the French early arthritis ESPOIR cohort were included in a randomized nested study into: (i) intervention group: general recommendations of good oral hygiene including teeth brushing, daily antiseptic mouthwash and twice a year scaling; and (ii) control group: no intervention. The primary end point was the delta DAS28-ESR.

Results: Four hundred and seventy-two patients were randomized (238 in intervention and 234 in control). 92/238 from the intervention group accepted the procedure and 81 had a first visit to the dentist. 56% of patients had periodontal disease at baseline. Duration of RA was 9.0±0.7 years. Baseline DAS28-ESR was 2.7±1.3. After a median duration of 24 months, delta DAS28-ESR was -0.17±1.29 and -0.09±1.28 in intervention and control groups, respectively (mean difference (complier average causal effect): -0.37 (95% CI -1.12, 0.37), P = 0.33). In the intervention group, there was a significant decrease of the bacteria involved in the red complex: Porphyromonas gingivalis (P = 0.002), Tannerella forsythia (P = 0.002) and Treponema denticola (P = 0.019). The patients with baseline periodontal disease and those who became negative for one red complex bacterium had a slightly more important decrease of DAS28-ESR.

Conclusion: Oral hygiene instruction together with regular scaling and polishing of the teeth significantly decreased the load of periodontal pathogens but did not decrease RA activity. This intervention should be tested in patients with earlier RA and more active disease.

Trial Registration: ClinicalTrials.gov, http://clinicaltrials.gov, NCT01831648.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/rheumatology/kez368DOI Listing
May 2020

In situ photochemical crosslinking of hydrogel membrane for Guided Tissue Regeneration.

Dent Mater 2018 12 15;34(12):1769-1782. Epub 2018 Oct 15.

Inserm, UMR 1229, RMeS, Regenerative Medicine and Skeleton, Université de Nantes, ONIRIS, Nantes, F-44042, France; Université de Nantes, UFR Odontologie, Nantes, F-44042, France; CHU Nantes, PHU4 OTONN, Nantes, F-44093, France. Electronic address:

Objective: Periodontitis is an inflammatory disease that destroys the tooth-supporting attachment apparatus. Guided tissue regeneration (GTR) is a technique based on a barrier membrane designed to prevent wound space colonization by gingival cells. This study examined a new formulation composed of two polymers that could be photochemically cross-linked in situ into an interpenetrated polymer network (IPN) forming a hydrogel membrane.

Methods: We synthetized and characterized silanized hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (Si-HPMC) for its cell barrier properties and methacrylated carboxymethyl chitosan (MA-CMCS) for its degradable backbone to use in IPN. Hydrogel membranes were cross-linked using riboflavin photoinitiator and a dentistry visible light lamp. The biomaterial's physicochemical and mechanical properties were determined. Hydrogel membrane degradation was evaluated in lysozyme. Cytocompatibility was estimated by neutral red uptake. The cell barrier property was studied culturing human primary gingival fibroblasts or human gingival explants on membrane and analyzed with confocal microscopy and histological staining.

Results: The IPN hydrogel membrane was obtained after 120s of irradiation. The IPN showed a synergistic increase in Young moduli compared with the single networks. The CMCS addition in IPN allows a progressive weight loss compared to each polymer network. Cytocompatibility was confirmed by neutral red assay. Human cell invasion was prevented by hydrogel membranes and histological sections revealed that the biomaterial exhibited a barrier effect in contact with soft gingival tissue.

Significance: We demonstrated the ability of an innovative polymer formulation to form in situ, using a dentist's lamp, an IPN hydrogel membrane, which could be an easy-to-use biomaterial for GTR therapy.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.dental.2018.09.017DOI Listing
December 2018

Twenty Years of Full-Mouth Disinfection: The Past, the Present and the Future.

Open Dent J 2018 31;12:435-442. Epub 2018 May 31.

Inserm, UMR 1229, RMeS, Regenerative Medicine and Skeleton, Université de Nantes, ONIRIS, Nantes, F-44042, France.

Background: Conventional periodontal treatment, performed quadrant by quadrant in multiple visits, was re-evaluated in the early 1990s when the full-mouth disinfection concept was introduced. Over the years, several modifications to the full-mouth disinfection approach have been suggested.

Objective: The purpose of this article is to review the evolution of full-mouth disinfection during the past 20 years, to specify its indications and to consider the prospects for this approach.

Materials And Methods: An electronic and manual search of the literature, ending in December 2016, was performed by two independent researchers. Only pivotal studies and randomized controlled clinical trials published in the English language that evaluated a new approach to full-mouth disinfection were selected.

Results: According to the studies included in our analysis (21 articles), several modified full-mouth disinfection protocols have been designed including: full-mouth treatment without chlorhexidine, the extension of hygiene methods and an increase in the duration of post-treatment chlorhexidine use, the replacement of chlorhexidine with other antiseptics, supplementation with antibiotics or probiotics, full-mouth antimicrobial photodynamic therapy and one-stage full-mouth disinfection combined with a periodontal dressing.

Conclusion: Since 1995, several modifications have been suggested to improve the effectiveness of full-mouth disinfection. The majority of the studies demonstrate that the results obtained with full-mouth disinfection and its variants are equivalent to each other and to those obtained with the conventional quadrant method. Currently, the selection of this technique remains empirical and depends on the preferences of the practitioner and the patient. In the future, a patient-centered approach should be the best indication for the use of this technique.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.2174/1874210601812010435DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5997853PMC
May 2018

Evaluation of a hydrogel membrane on bone regeneration in furcation periodontal defects in dogs.

Dent Mater J 2018 Sep 20;37(5):825-834. Epub 2018 Jun 20.

INSERM, UMR-S 1229, RMeS, Faculty of Dental Surgery, University of Nantes.

The aim of the study was to evaluate bone regeneration using a canine model with surgically created periodontal defects filled for 12 weeks using a stratified biomaterial consisting in a biphasic calcium phosphate (BCP) covered with a crosslinking hydrogel acting as polymer membrane of silated hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (Si-HPMC) as the tested new concept. Bilateral, critical-sized, defects were surgically created at the mandibular premolar teeth of six adult beagle dogs. The defects were randomly allocated and: (i) left empty for spontaneous healing or filled with: (ii) BCP and a collagen membrane; (iii) BCP and hydrogel Si-HPMC membrane. At 12 weeks, the experimental conditions resulted in significantly enhanced bone regeneration in the test BCP/Si-HPMC group. Within the limits of this study, we suggest that the hydrogel Si-HPMC may act as an occlusive barrier to protect bone area from soft connective tissue invasion and then effectively contribute to enhance bone regeneration.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.4012/dmj.2017-238DOI Listing
September 2018

Silicon Nitride (SiN) Implants: The Future of Dental Implantology?

J Oral Implantol 2017 Jun 16;43(3):240-244. Epub 2017 Mar 16.

3   Unit of Periodontology, Dental Institute, King's College, London, UK.

For decades titanium has been the preferred material for dental implant fabrication, with mechanical and biological performance resulting in high clinical success rates. These have been further enhanced by incremental development of surface modifications aimed at improving speed and degree of osseointegration and resulting in enhanced clinical treatment options and outcomes. However, increasing demand for metal-free dental restorations has also led to the development of ceramic-based dental implants, such as zirconia. In orthopedics, alternative biomaterials, such as polyetheretherketone or silicon nitride, have been used for implant applications. The latter is potentially of particular interest for oral use as it has been shown to have antibacterial properties. In this article we aim to shed light on this particular biomaterial as a future promising candidate for dental implantology applications, addressing basic specifications required for any dental implant material. In view of available preclinical data, silicon nitride seems to have the essential characteristics to be a candidate for dental implants material. This novel ceramic has a surface with potentially antimicrobial properties, and if this is confirmed in future research, it could be of great interest for oral use.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1563/aaid-joi-D-16-00146DOI Listing
June 2017

An analysis model for investigating the staining effect of various chlorhexidine-based mouthwashes.

J Clin Exp Dent 2017 Mar 1;9(3):e410-e416. Epub 2017 Mar 1.

Prof, PhD, UFR d'odontologie. 1, Place A. Ricordeau, 44082, Nantes cedex2.

Background: There are different mouthwashes containing chlorhexidine in different concentrations, as well as various excipients. Chlorhexidine induce stains or discoloration in teeth and mucous membranes. The aim of this work was to design a model to reproduce staining associated with the use of different mouthwashes containing chlorhexidine.

Material And Methods: We used as substrates of natural teeth and elephant ivory slices. Different incubation baths were conducted over 21 days in culture dishes at 37°C. At the beginning of experiment before incubation (D0) and after 21 days (D21) of incubation with different mouthwashes, pictures of substrates were taken in a standardized manner and an image analysis software was used to analyse and quantify the staining under the various conditions by using the 3 main colours (Red, Green, Blue, RGB).

Results: The results of this work demonstrate a very good reproducibility of the protocol, and secondly, a different expression statistically significant of the primary blue colour. We suggest that for a given concentration of chlorhexidine, the staining effects may vary depending on the excipients used.

Conclusions: This replicable model, easy to implement over a relatively short duration, can be used for evaluation of existing mouthwashes, and to test the excipients anti discoloration proposed by manufacturers. In vitro, chlorhexidine, mouthwashes, dental stain, tooth discoloration.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.4317/jced.53375DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5347291PMC
March 2017

Clinical Performance of Narrow-Diameter Titanium-Zirconium Implants: A Systematic Review.

Implant Dent 2017 Apr;26(2):316-323

*Clinical Instructor, Department of Oral Implantology, Faculty of Dental Surgery, University of Nantes, Nantes, France; Associate Professor, Department of Periodontology, Faculty of Dental surgery, (Inserm U791/UIC 11) CHU de Nantes, France. †Clinical Instructor, Department of Oral Implantology, Faculty of Dental Surgery, University of Nantes, Nantes, France. ‡Adjunct Assistant Professor, Department of Periodontology and Implant Dentistry, College of Dentistry, New York University, New York, NY, and Institut Straumann, Basel, Switzerland. §Professor and Head, Department of Periodontology, Faculty of Dental surgery, (Inserm U791/UIC 11) CHU de Nantes, Nantes, France. ¶Associate Professor and Head, Department of Oral Implantology, Faculty of Dental Surgery, University of Nantes, Nantes, France.

Purpose: Implant-supported prosthetic rehabilitations are in constant augmentation in everyday dental practice. This is largely due to increasing demand from patients for fixed or implant-stabilized prosthesis, although they are frequently reticent to complex preimplant bone augmentation surgeries, whenever bone volume is lacking. Narrow-diameter implants (NDI; ≤3.5 mm) have been developed to offer relatively simple implant solutions in challenging bone-deficient sites. However, concerns regarding their mechanical properties have been raised. Special titanium-zirconium material (Ti-Zr), with superior mechanical resistance, compared with pure titanium alloys has been introduced into the market. The purpose of this systematic review was to determine the available data on clinical performance of Ti-Zr NDI.

Materials And Methods: A literature search of all available clinical articles dealing with Ti-Zr NDI has been carried out. After including only prospective clinical trials, 14 papers were retrieved for thorough reviewing.

Conclusion: Short-term results from preliminary clinical reports are quite promising, although the number of published studies and the follow-up periods are still insufficient to determine the real benefit of this hybrid material compared with titanium, especially when using NDI.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/ID.0000000000000557DOI Listing
April 2017

Influence of dental filling material type on the concentration of interleukin 9 in the samples of gingival crevicular fluid.

Vojnosanit Pregl 2016 Aug;73(8):728-34

Background/aim: Several cytokines and lymphokines (IL1β, ENA78, IL6, TNFα, IL8 and S100A8) are expressed during dental pulp inflammation. Analysis of gingival crevicu-lar fluid (GCF) offers a non-invasive means of studying gen-eral host response in oral cavity. Although GCF levels of various mediators could reflect the state of inflammation both in dental pulp and gingiva adjacent to a tooth, GCF samples of those without significant gingivitis could be inter-preted as reflection of pulpal process. The aim of this study was to investigate IL9 GCF values in patients with dental car-ies and to assess possible influence of various dental fillings materials on local IL9 production.

Methods: The study group included 90 patients, aged 18–70, with inclusion and exclusion criteria in the prospective clinical study. Of the 6 types of material used for the restoration of prepared cavities, 3 were intended for temporary and 3 for definitive restora-tion. According to dental fillings weight, all the participants were divided into 3 groups: those with fillings lighter than 0.50 g, those with 0.50–1.00 g, and those with fillings heavier than 1.00 g. Samples were taken from gingival sulcus using the filter paper technique. Clinical parameters were deter-mined by bleeding index, plaque index (Silness-Lou, 0–3), gingival index (0–3), and gingival sulcus depth. Cytokine con-centrations were assessed using commercially available cy-tomix.

Results: According to the weight of dental fillings, there was a clear decreament trend of IL9 values meaning that dental defects greater than 1.00 g of dental filling were associated with lower GCF IL9 concentration. The IL9 val-ues correlated with the degree of gingival index and depth of gingival sulcus, being higher with more advanced gingivitis and more pronounced anatomical changes in the tooth edge. Different filling materials exerted various local IL9 responses. Zink polycarbonate cement and amalgam fillings induced a significant and long-lasting local IL9 decrement, while the use of Tetric EvoCeram and GMA-BISK significantly increased IL9 levels.

Conclusion: The obtained results indicate that IL9 GCF could be regarded as a measure of odontoblasts’ re-sponse to the extensity of dental caries. The type of material used for dental fillings could profoundly alter biological func-tion of gingival and pulpal cells. Also, the results obtained in this study suggest that some materials could even enhance wound repair by modulating macrophage activation.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.2298/VSP140227054SDOI Listing
August 2016

Periodontitis as a risk factor for systemic disease: Are microparticles the missing link?

Med Hypotheses 2015 Jun 2;84(6):555-6. Epub 2015 Mar 2.

Department of Periodontology (UIC Odontology, CHU, LIOAD Inserm U791), Faculty of Dental Surgery, University of Nantes, France. Electronic address:

Periodontitis is an oral inflammatory disease affecting the teeth supportive tissue. Its bacterial infectious etiology is well established. Periodontitis has been associated with increased prevalence of systemic diseases such as cardiovascular diseases, diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis, preeclampsia, preterm birth and inflammatory bowel disease. The rational of considering periodontitis as risk factor for systemic disease is the passage of inflammatory cytokines and/or bacteria in the bloodstream, thus affecting distant organs. Membrane microparticles are released by multiple cells in inflammatory environment. Recent data suggested the role of these microparticles in the pathogenic process of many systemic diseases, that can be also associated to periodontitis. We hypothesized that periodontitis could be a chronic reservoir of microparticles, hence elucidating partially the interaction with systemic diseases initiation or progression.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.mehy.2015.02.013DOI Listing
June 2015

MMP-9 -1562 C>T (rs3918242) promoter polymorphism as a susceptibility factor for multiple gingival recessions.

Int J Periodontics Restorative Dent 2015 Mar-Apr;35(2):263-9

The objective of this pilot study was to investigate the potential role of -1562 C>T single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in the promoter region of the matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) gene as a risk modulator in the development of multiple gingival recessions (MGRs) in young adults in the Serbian population. The study sample comprised 161 systemically healthy people: 60 with MGRs and 101 controls with healthy periodontal tissues. Genotyping was done using polymerase chain reaction/restriction fragment length polymorphism approach on DNA obtained from buccal swabs. Clinical measurements included vertical recession depth (VRD), clinical attachment level (CAL), keratinized gingival width (KGW), visible plaque index (PI), and bleeding on probing (BOP). Heterozygotes (CT) were significantly more frequent in the MGRs group than in the control group (P = .005) and carriers of the T allele had an approximately threefold increase of MGRs risk. Patients with the CT genotype exhibited significantly higher values of VRD and CAL and significantly lower values of KGW than patients with the wildtype genotype. Associations among different genotypes and periodontal biotypes in the MGRs group remained insignificant because all participants exhibited thin biotype. The -1562 C>T SNP in the promoter region of MMP-9 appears to be a risk factor for MGR development and a potential predictor of more severe clinical phenotype.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.11607/prd.2087DOI Listing
December 2016

CD14 and TNFα single nucleotide polymorphisms are candidates for genetic biomarkers of peri-implantitis.

Clin Oral Investig 2015 May 14;19(4):791-801. Epub 2014 Sep 14.

Department for Periodontology and Oral Medicine, Faculty of Dental Medicine, University of Belgrade, Belgrade, Serbia,

Objectives: This study aims to investigate whether CD14-159 C/T and TNFα -308 A/G single nucleotide polymorphisms are associated with peri-implantitis and to evaluate their effects on bone resorption by correlating with local levels of receptor activator nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (RANKL) and osteoprotegerin (OPG).

Material And Methods: Study population included 369 Southeastern Europe Caucasians (180 with peri-implantitis and 189 with healthy peri-implant tissues). Genotyping was performed using polymerase chain reaction from the periphery blood samples, while RANKL and OPG were evaluated in peri-implant crevicular fluid specimens using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay.

Results: Analysis of CD14-159 C/T polymorphism showed that genotype of CC nucleic acid combination was associated with peri-implantitis demonstrating a fivefold increased risk in these carriers. Furthermore, for TNFα -308 A/G polymorphisms, it was evidenced that AG genotype was associated with peri-implantitis and a fivefold increased risk in these carriers. Peri-implantitis patients with CC genotype at CD14-159 exhibited significantly higher concentrations of RANKL and relative ratio RANKL/OPG when compared to patients with CT genotype, while concentration of biomarkers between different genotypes at TNFα -308 remained insignificant.

Conclusion: Within the limitations of the study, we can conclude that CD14-159 C/T and TNFα -308 A/G polymorphisms are associated with peri-implantitis and may present biomarkers for peri-implantitis.

Clinical Relevance: Investigated genetic markers might serve as precious parameters in clinical practice in course of treatment planning and prognosis, since preventive and treatment approach could be positively shifted and adjusted depending on present genotype.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00784-014-1313-3DOI Listing
May 2015

Estimation of bone loss biomarkers as a diagnostic tool for peri-implantitis.

J Periodontol 2014 Nov 30;85(11):1566-74. Epub 2014 May 30.

Department for Periodontology and Oral Medicine, Faculty of Dental Medicine, University of Belgrade, Belgrade, Serbia.

Background: The aims of this study are to estimate the profile of bone loss biomarkers in peri-implant tissues and to identify potential prognostic biomarkers of peri-implantitis.

Methods: Peri-implant crevicular fluid samples collected from 164 participants (52 patients with peri-implantitis, 54 with mucositis, and 58 with healthy peri-implant tissues) were analyzed using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays to evaluate concentrations of the receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB (RANK), soluble RANK ligand (sRANKL), osteoprotegerin (OPG), cathepsin-K, and sclerostin.

Results: Concentrations of RANK, sRANKL, OPG, and sclerostin were significantly increased in patients with peri-implantitis compared with patients with healthy peri-implant tissues. Comparisons between peri-implantitis and mucositis demonstrated significantly higher values of sclerostin in peri-implantitis samples. Comparisons between mucositis and healthy peri-implant tissues showed significantly increased levels of RANK and cathepsin-K in mucositis.

Conclusion: These results are suggestive of a role of sRANKL, OPG, and sclerostin as prognostic biomarkers in peri-implantitis.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1902/jop.2014.140069DOI Listing
November 2014

The association of hydrogel and biphasic calcium phosphate in the treatment of dehiscence-type peri-implant defects: an experimental study in dogs.

J Mater Sci Mater Med 2013 Dec 3;24(12):2749-60. Epub 2013 Aug 3.

Laboratory of Osteo-Articular and Dental Tissue Engineering (LIOAD), INSERM, U791, 1 Place Alexis Ricordeau, 44042, Nantes, France.

Hydrogel polymers have many applications in regenerative medicine. The aim of this study in dogs was to investigate bone regeneration in dehiscence-type peri-implant defects created surgically and treated with (i) biphasic calcium phosphate (BCP) granules alone; (ii) a composite putty hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC)/BCP (MBCP/putty); and (iii) a polymer crosslinked membrane of silanized-HPMC (Si-HPMC/BCP) compared with empty controls. At 3 months, new bone formation was significantly more important in defects filled with HPMC/BCP or Si-HPMC/BCP compared with spontaneous healing in control (P = 0.032 and P = 0.046 respectively) and more substantial compared with BCP alone. Furthermore, new bone formation in direct contact with the implant surface was observed in all three groups treated with BCP. The addition of HPMC to the BCP granules may have enhanced the initial stability of the material within the blood clot in these large and complex osseous defects. The Si-HPMC hydrogel may also act as an occlusive membrane covering the BCP, which could improve the stability of the granules in the defect area. However, the crosslinking time of the Si-HPMC is too long for easy handling and the mechanical properties remain to be improved. The composite MBCP/putty appears to be a valuable bone-graft material in complex defects in periodontology and implantology. These encouraging results should now be confirmed in clinical studies.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10856-013-5019-xDOI Listing
December 2013

Clinical outcomes after nonsurgical periodontal therapy with an Er:YAG laser device: a randomized controlled pilot study.

Photomed Laser Surg 2012 Jul 3;30(7):347-53. Epub 2012 May 3.

Department of Periodontology (CHU de Nantes), Faculty of Dental Surgery, Nantes, France.

Objective: The purpose of this study was to compare the short-term effects of nonsurgical periodontal treatment with the short-term effects of Er:YAG laser debridement (ERL) and manual scaling and root planning (SRP) in nonsmoking patients with chronic periodontitis.

Methods: Nineteen nonsmoking patients (mean age 60.7) with chronic generalized periodontitis were randomly treated with ERL or SRP in a split-mouth design. Clinical attachment level (CAL), periodontal pocket depth (PPD), and bleeding on probing (BOP) were recorded. Immediately after completion of the treatment procedure, patients used a visual analogue scale (VAS) to grade the degree of discomfort experienced during treatment.

Results: Both groups showed significant reductions in their PPD, CAL, and BOP values 2 months after treatment. The sites treated with Er:YAG laser demonstrated mean PPD changes that varied from 5.00 ± 0.63 to 3.54 ± 0.83 mm, mean CAL changes that varied from 5.19 ± 0.69 to 3.86 ± 0.94 mm, and BOP changes that varied from 26.57 ± 12.54 to 13.17 ± 7.52 mm. Sites treated with manual SRP demonstrated mean PPD changes that varied from 4.91 ± 0.55 to 3.51 ± 0.98 mm, mean CAL changes that varied from 5.08 ± 0.59 to 3.95 ± 1.16 mm, and BOP values that varied from 24.81 ± 7.65 to 15.41 ± 6.32 mm. Comparison of the two techniques demonstrated the statistically significant superiority of Er:YAG only for the CAL scores (p<0.05).

Conclusions: Within the limits of this study, ERL may be posited as an alternative to mechanical treatment in the management of chronic periodontitis. In addition, ERL may be performed on patients who are sensitive to the use of injectable anesthetics. Future studies, with larger samples, are needed to determine the long-term clinical outcomes of ERL.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/pho.2011.3215DOI Listing
July 2012

Treatment of periodontal defects in dogs using an injectable composite hydrogel/biphasic calcium phosphate.

J Mater Sci Mater Med 2011 Jul 25;22(7):1707-17. Epub 2011 May 25.

INSERM, U791, Laboratory for Osteo-Articular and Dental Tissue Engineering (LIOAD), Faculty of Dental Surgery, University of Nantes, 1 Place Alexis Ricordeau, BP 84215, 44042 Nantes, France.

An injectable composite silanized hydroxypropyl methyl cellulose/biphasic calcium phosphate (Si-HPMC/BCP) has been investigated in humans with promising results. The aim of this study was to evaluate his efficacy for treating periodontal defects (canine fenestration and premolar furcation) in dog models. At 3 months, we observed that bone formation around BCP particles in furcation model is more discernible but not statistically significant in defects filled with Si-HPMC/BCP compared to healing in control. We suggest that BCP particles sustain the bone healing process by osteoconduction, while the Si-HPMC hydrogel enhances intergranular cohesion and acts as an exclusion barrier. Furthermore, bone ingrowth is not so distinctive in superficial defects where the biomaterial appears unstable. These results with Si-HPMC/BCP are encouraging. In addition, this biomaterial is easy to use and simplifies the process of filling periodontal lesions. However, more researches are needed to improve the viscosity and hardness to adjust the material to the specificities of periodontal defects.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10856-011-4344-1DOI Listing
July 2011

[Peri-implantitis: tools and techniques for disinfecting the implant surface].

Schweiz Monatsschr Zahnmed 2011 ;121(4):341-55

Interne en Odontologie, Dèpartement de Parodontologie, Universitè de Nantes.

View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
May 2011

Laser-induced fluorescence for subgingival calculus detection: scientific rational and clinical application in periodontology.

Photomed Laser Surg 2011 Sep 15;29(9):593-6. Epub 2011 Apr 15.

Department of Periodontology, Faculty of Dental Surgery, Nantes, France.

Objective: To review the data available on the laser-induced calculus fluorescence phenomenon and the calculus detection devices as well as to determine the clinical relevance of using commercialized calculus detection devices in periodontal treatment.

Methods: In vitro or in vivo English publications found on Medline.

Results: In vitro and in vivo studies showed that the devices on the market had a satisfactory detection capacity. Very few studies demonstrated that the erbium:yttrium-aluminium-garnet (Er:YAG) laser debridement, when performed with automatic calculus detection, could lead to improvements at the clinical level, and the outcome was similar to that obtained with conventional treatments.

Conclusions: Although preliminary data were encouraging, there was a lack of scientific data concerning the calculus detection devices. Therefore, future studies are crucial for determining the clinical relevance of such equipment.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/pho.2010.2951DOI Listing
September 2011

Tooth desensitization with an Er:YAG laser: in vitro microscopical observation and a case report.

Lasers Med Sci 2011 Jan 1;26(1):139-42. Epub 2010 Sep 1.

Department of Periodontology, Faculty of Dental Surgery (CHU), Nantes, France.

Tooth hypersensitivity is a frequent condition that causes discomfort and sometimes severe pain. It is caused by exposure of spots of dentinal tubules to the oral environment. Conventional desensitizing agents (professional pastes, toothpastes, mouthwashes) aim to obliterate the exposed dentinal tubules. Laser desensitization was introduced as an alternative efficient tool for the immediate treatment of tooth hypersensitivity. We explored in vitro the microscopical occluding effects of the Er:YAG laser on exposed dentinal tubules. The clinical application of this technique is also described.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10103-010-0835-4DOI Listing
January 2011

Experimental animal models in periodontology: a review.

Open Dent J 2010 Apr 29;4:37-47. Epub 2010 Apr 29.

Department of Periodontology, Faculty of Dental Surgery, University of Nantes, 1 Place Alexis Ricordeau, 44042 Nantes, France.

In periodontal research, animal studies are complementary to in vitro experiments prior to testing new treatments. Animal models should make possible the validation of hypotheses and prove the safety and efficacy of new regenerating approaches using biomaterials, growth factors or stem cells. A review of the literature was carried out by using electronic databases (PubMed, ISI Web of Science). Numerous animal models in different species such as rats, hamsters, rabbits, ferrets, canines and primates have been used for modeling human periodontal diseases and treatments. However, both the anatomy and physiopathology of animals are different from those of humans, making difficult the evaluation of new therapies. Experimental models have been developed in order to reproduce major periodontal diseases (gingivitis, periodontitis), their pathogenesis and to investigate new surgical techniques. The aim of this review is to define the most pertinent animal models for periodontal research depending on the hypothesis and expected results.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.2174/1874210601004010037DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2885595PMC
April 2010

Er:YAG laser in the clinical management of severe peri-implantitis: a case report.

J Oral Implantol 2011 Mar 16;37 Spec No:212-7. Epub 2010 Jun 16.

Department of Periodontology, Faculty of Dental Surgery, Nantes, France.

Peri-implantitis is bacterial infections of peri-implant supporting tissues, involving the peri-implant bone. Several treatment protocols have been tested in clinical practice with variable efficacy. The clinical management of peri-implantitis aims for elimination of plaque and calculus, decontamination of the failing implant surface, and regeneration of lost bone tissue. Surface decontamination is an important part of all suggested treatments. This can be accomplished with the use of chemical agents (eg, chlorhexidine) or mechanical (eg, ultrasonic) or photonic (eg, laser) devices. In this report, we present a case of severe peri-implantitis that was successfully managed with a combined nonsurgical and surgical approach. Implant surface debridement/decontamination of the implant surface was achieved with an erbium-doped yttrium aluminium garnet (Er:YAG) laser device.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1563/AAID-JOI-D-09-00145.1DOI Listing
March 2011