Publications by authors named "X Q Chen"

70,191 Publications

Lycium barbarum mitigates radiation injury via regulation of the immune function, gut microbiota, and related metabolites.

Biomed Pharmacother 2021 May 3;139:111654. Epub 2021 May 3.

Tianjin University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Tianjin, China; Beijing Institute of Radiation Medicine, Beijing, China. Electronic address:

Previous studies have suggested that Lycium barbarum (L. barbarum) has a radioprotective function, although more in-depth investigation is still required. We investigated the radioprotective efficacy of extract of the fruits of L. barbarum (LBE) and its radioprotective mechanisms. Mice were exposed to 8.5 Gy, 5.5 Gy, or 6.0 Gy total body irradiation (TBI), and the survival rate, lymphocyte percentage, amount of cytokines, and viability of the irradiated cells, as well as the gut microbiome and fecal metabolomics were studied. LBE enhanced the survival of the mice exposed to 8.5 Gy γ-ray TBI or 5.5 Gy X-ray TBI. After 6.0 Gy γ-ray TBI, LBE exhibited good immunomodulatory properties, mainly characterized by the accelerated recovery of lymphocyte percentages, and the enhanced expression of immune-related cytokines. LBE reconstituted the gut microbiota of irradiated mice, increased the relative abundance of potentially beneficial genera (e.g., Turicibacter, Akkermansia), and decreased the relative abundance of potentially harmful bacterial genera (e.g., Rikenellaceae_RC9_gut_group). Beneficial regulatory effects of LBE on the host metabolites were also noted, and the major upregulated metabolites induced by LBE, such as Tetrahydrofolic acid and N-ornithyl-L-taurine, were positively correlated with the immune factor interleukin (IL)-6. In vitro, LBE also increased the vitality of rat small intestinal epithelial cells (IEC-6) after 4.0 Gy γ-ray irradiation and promoted the growth of Akkermansia muciniphila. These results confirmed a radioprotective function of LBE and indicated that the radioprotective mechanism may be due to immunomodulation and the synergistically modulating effect on the gut microbiota and related metabolites.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.biopha.2021.111654DOI Listing
May 2021

Diverse data augmentation for learning image segmentation with cross-modality annotations.

Med Image Anal 2021 Apr 20;71:102060. Epub 2021 Apr 20.

Department of Radiology and Biomedical Research Imaging Center (BRIC), University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC, USA. Electronic address:

The dearth of annotated data is a major hurdle in building reliable image segmentation models. Manual annotation of medical images is tedious, time-consuming, and significantly variable across imaging modalities. The need for annotation can be ameliorated by leveraging an annotation-rich source modality in learning a segmentation model for an annotation-poor target modality. In this paper, we introduce a diverse data augmentation generative adversarial network (DDA-GAN) to train a segmentation model for an unannotated target image domain by borrowing information from an annotated source image domain. This is achieved by generating diverse augmented data for the target domain by one-to-many source-to-target translation. The DDA-GAN uses unpaired images from the source and target domains and is an end-to-end convolutional neural network that (i) explicitly disentangles domain-invariant structural features related to segmentation from domain-specific appearance features, (ii) combines structural features from the source domain with appearance features randomly sampled from the target domain for data augmentation, and (iii) train the segmentation model with the augmented data in the target domain and the annotations from the source domain. The effectiveness of our method is demonstrated both qualitatively and quantitatively in comparison with the state of the art for segmentation of craniomaxillofacial bony structures via MRI and cardiac substructures via CT.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.media.2021.102060DOI Listing
April 2021

δ-MnO changed the structure of humic-like acid during co-composting of chicken manure and rice straw.

Waste Manag 2021 May 3;128:16-24. Epub 2021 May 3.

College of Life Science, Northeast Agricultural University, Harbin 150030, China.

Improving the structure and quantity of humus is important to reduce agriculture organic waste by composting. The present study was aimed to assess the role of δ-MnO on humus fractions formation during co-composting of chicken manure and rice straw. Two tests (control group (CK), the addition of δ-MnO (M)) were carried out. The results showed that organic matter content decreased by 34% and 29% at M and CK, suggesting the process of organic waste disposal was accelerated by adding δ-MnO. The structures and quantity of fulvic acid (FA) and humic acid (HA) (as the main fractions of humus) were investigated. The δ-MnO had no significant effect on improving the concentration of FA and HA (p > 0.05). However, the addition of δ-MnO caused different effects on the FA and HA structure. The humification degree of FA improved, while bioavailability of HA increased through adding δ-MnO. The addition of δ-MnO rephased the bacterial community structure, slowing down the succession rate of the bacterial community in M composting. After adding δ-MnO the structural equation modeling results showed that environmental factors could directly drive changes in FA and HA by modulating the bacterial community. Furthermore, the role of FA and HA in the soil amendment was also demonstrated. Therefore, the addition of MnO might be promising for agriculture organic waste treatment and environmental repair during composting.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.wasman.2021.04.039DOI Listing
May 2021

Opposing roles of E3 ligases TRIM23 and TRIM21 in regulation of ion channel ANO1 protein levels.

J Biol Chem 2021 May 3:100738. Epub 2021 May 3.

Division of Life Science, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Hong Kong; Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Hong Kong; State Key Laboratory of Molecular Neuroscience, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Hong Kong; HKUST Shenzhen Research Institute, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Hong Kong; Hong Kong Branch of Guangdong Southern Marine Science and Engineering Laboratory (Guangzhou), Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Hong Kong. Electronic address:

ANO1 (TMEM16A) is a calcium-activated chloride channel that plays critical roles in diverse physiological processes, such as sensory transduction and epithelial secretion. ANO1 levels have been shown to be altered under physiological and pathological conditions, although the molecular mechanisms that control ANO1 protein levels remain unclear. The ubiquitin-proteasome system is known to regulate the levels of numerous ion channels, but little information is available regarding whether and how ubiquitination regulates levels of ANO1. Here, we showed that two E3 ligases, TRIM23 and TRIM21, physically interact with the C-terminus of ANO1. In vitro and in vivo assays demonstrated that whereas TRIM23 ubiquitinated ANO1 leading to its stabilization, TRIM21 ubiquitinated ANO1 and induced its degradation. Notably, ANO1 regulation by TRIM23 and TRIM21 is involved in chemical-induced pain sensation, salivary secretion, and heart-rate control in mice, and TRIM23 also mediates ANO1 upregulation induced by epidermal growth factor (EGF) treatment. Our results suggest that these two antagonistic E3 ligases act together to control ANO1 expression and function. Our findings reveal a previously unrecognized mechanism for regulating ANO1 protein levels and identify a potential molecular link between ANO1 regulation, EGF, and other signaling pathways.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jbc.2021.100738DOI Listing
May 2021

The cross-kingdom interaction between Helicobacter pylori and Candida albicans.

PLoS Pathog 2021 May 6;17(5):e1009515. Epub 2021 May 6.

State Key Laboratory of Oral Diseases & National Clinical Research Center for Oral Diseases & West China School of Stomatology, Sichuan University, Chengdu, China.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.ppat.1009515DOI Listing
May 2021