Publications by authors named "Won-Yong Jeon"

14 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Electricity auto-generating skin patch promotes wound healing process by activation of mechanosensitive ion channels.

Biomaterials 2021 Jun 9;275:120948. Epub 2021 Jun 9.

Institute of Tissue Regeneration Engineering (ITREN), Dankook University, Cheonan, 31116, Republic of Korea; Department of Nanobiomedical Science and BK21 NBM Global Research Center for Regenerative Medicine, Dankook University, Cheonan, 31116, Republic of Korea; Department of Biomaterials Science, College of Dentistry, Dankook University, Cheonan, 31116, Republic of Korea; Department of Regenerative Dental Medicine, College of Dentistry, Dankook University, Cheonan, 31116, Republic of Korea; Cell & Matter Institute, Dankook University, Cheonan, 31116, Republic of Korea; Mechanobiology Dental Medicine Research Center, Cheonan, 31116, Republic of Korea; UCL Eastman-Korea Dental Medicine Innovation Centre, Dankook University, Cheonan, 31116, Republic of Korea. Electronic address:

Electricity constitutes a natural biophysical component that preserves tissue homeostasis and modulates many biological processes, including the repair of damaged tissues. Wound healing involves intricate cellular events, such as inflammation, angiogenesis, matrix synthesis, and epithelialization whereby multiple cell types sense the environmental cues to rebuild the structure and functions. Here, we report that electricity auto-generating glucose-responsive enzymatic-biofuel-cell (EBC) skin patch stimulates the wound healing process. Rat wounded-skin model and in vitro cell cultures showed that EBC accelerated wound healing by modulating inflammation while stimulating angiogenesis, fibroblast fuctionality and matrix synthesis. Of note, EBC-activated cellular bahaviors were linked to the signalings involved with calcium influx, which predominantly dependent on the mechanosensitive ion channels, primarily Piezo1. Inhibition of Piezo1-receptor impaired the EBC-induced key functions of both fibroblasts and endothelial cells in the wound healing. This study highlights the significant roles of electricity played in wound healing through activated mechanosensitive ion channels and the calcium influx, and suggests the possibility of the electricity auto-generating EBC-based skin patch for use as a wound healing device.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.biomaterials.2021.120948DOI Listing
June 2021

Development of a Glucose Sensor Based on Glucose Dehydrogenase Using Polydopamine-Functionalized Nanotubes.

Membranes (Basel) 2021 May 24;11(6). Epub 2021 May 24.

Department of Chemistry, College of Science & Technology, Dankook University, Dandae-ro, Cheonan-si, Chungnam 31116, Korea.

The electrochemical-based detection of glucose is widely used for diagnostic purposes and is mediated by enzyme-mediated signal transduction mechanisms. For such applications, recent attention has focused on utilizing the oxygen-insensitive glucose dehydrogenase (GDH) enzyme in place of the glucose oxidase (GOx) enzyme, which is sensitive to oxygen levels. Currently used Ru-based redox mediators mainly work with GOx, while Ru(dmo-bpy)Cl has been proposed as a promising mediator that works with GDH. However, there remains an outstanding need to improve Ru(dmo-bpy)Cl attachment to electrode surfaces. Herein, we report the use of polydopamine-functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes (PDA-MWCNTs) to effectively attach Ru(dmo-bpy)Cl and GDH onto screen-printed carbon electrodes (SPCEs) without requiring a cross-linker. PDA-MWCNTs were characterized by Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA), while the fabrication and optimization of Ru(dmo-bpy)Cl/PDA-MWCNT/SPCEs were characterized by cyclic voltammetry (CV) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) measurements. The experimental results demonstrate a wide linear range of glucose-concentration-dependent responses and the multi-potential step (MPS) technique facilitated the selective detection of glucose in the presence of physiologically relevant interfering species, as well as in biological fluids (e.g., serum). The ease of device fabrication and high detection performance demonstrate a viable pathway to develop glucose sensors based on the GDH enzyme and Ru(dmo-bpy)Cl redox mediator and the sensing strategy is potentially extendable to other bioanalytes as well.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/membranes11060384DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8225004PMC
May 2021

Pentacyanoammineferrate-Based Non-Enzymatic Electrochemical Biosensing Platform for Selective Uric Acid Measurement.

Sensors (Basel) 2021 Feb 24;21(5). Epub 2021 Feb 24.

Department of Chemistry, College of Natural Science, Dankook University, Anseo-Dong, Cheonan, Chungnam 31116, Korea.

The electrochemical-based detection of uric acid (UA) is widely used for diagnostic purposes. However, various interfering species such as ascorbic acid, dopamine, and glucose can affect electrochemical signals, and hence there is an outstanding need to develop improved sensing platforms to detect UA with high selectivity. Herein, we report a pentagonal mediator-based non-enzymatic electrochemical biosensing platform to selectively measure UA in the presence of interfering species. The working electrode was fabricated by electrodepositing polymerized 1-vinylimidazole (PVI), which has an imidazole ligand, onto indium tin oxide (ITO), and then conjugating nickel ions to the PVI-coated ITO electrode. Electrode performance was characterized by cyclic voltammetry (CV) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) measurements and integrated together with pentacyanoammineferrate, which can bind to the amine groups of UA and function as an electron transferring mediator. The experimental results showed a wide linear range of UA concentration-dependent responses and the multi-potential step (MPS) technique facilitated selective detection of UA in the presence of physiologically relevant interfering species. Altogether, these findings support that pentacyanoammineferrate-based non-enzymatic electrodes are suitable biosensing platforms for the selective measurement of UA, and such approaches could potentially be extended to other bioanalytes as well.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/s21051574DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7956465PMC
February 2021

Stopping Membrane-Enveloped Viruses with Nanotechnology Strategies: Toward Antiviral Drug Development and Pandemic Preparedness.

ACS Nano 2021 01 11;15(1):125-148. Epub 2020 Dec 11.

School of Chemical Engineering and Biomedical Institute for Convergence at SKKU (BICS), Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 16419, Republic of Korea.

Membrane-enveloped viruses are a leading cause of viral epidemics, and there is an outstanding need to develop broad-spectrum antiviral strategies to treat and prevent enveloped virus infections. In this review, we critically discuss why the lipid membrane surrounding enveloped virus particles is a promising antiviral target and cover the latest progress in nanotechnology research to design and evaluate membrane-targeting virus inhibition strategies. These efforts span diverse topics such as nanomaterials, self-assembly, biosensors, nanomedicine, drug delivery, and medical devices and have excellent potential to support the development of next-generation antiviral drug candidates and technologies. Application examples in the areas of human medicine and agricultural biosecurity are also presented. Looking forward, research in this direction is poised to strengthen capabilities for virus pandemic preparedness and demonstrates how nanotechnology strategies can help to solve global health challenges related to infectious diseases.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/acsnano.0c07489DOI Listing
January 2021

Medicinal Activities and Nanomedicine Delivery Strategies for Oil and Its Molecular Components.

Molecules 2020 Nov 19;25(22). Epub 2020 Nov 19.

School of Chemical Engineering and Biomedical Institute for Convergence at SKKU (BICS), Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 16419, Korea.

oil (BJO) is widely used in traditional Chinese medicine to treat various types of cancer and inflammatory diseases. There is significant interest in understanding the medicinal activities of BJO and its molecular components, especially quassinoids, and in exploring how they can be incorporated into nanomedicine delivery strategies for improved application prospects. Herein, we cover the latest progress in developing different classes of drug delivery vehicles, including nanoemulsions, liposomes, nanostructured lipid carriers, and spongosomes, to encapsulate BJO and purified quassinoids. An introduction to the composition and medicinal activities of BJO and its molecular components, including quassinoids and fatty acids, is first provided. Application examples involving each type of drug delivery vehicle are then critically presented. Future opportunities for nanomedicine delivery strategies in the field are also discussed and considered within the context of translational medicine needs and drug development processes.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/molecules25225414DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7699344PMC
November 2020

Motility enhancement of human spermatozoa using electrical stimulation in the nano-Ampere range with enzymatic biofuel cells.

PLoS One 2020 20;15(2):e0228097. Epub 2020 Feb 20.

CHA Fertility Center Seoul Station, Jung-gu, Seoul, Republic of Korea.

Sperm motility is a crucial factor for normal fertilisation that is partly supported by mitochondrial activity. Enzymatic biofuel cells (EBFCs) generate electric currents by an electron grade from anodic to cathodic electrodes in a culture media. We demonstrate that electrical stimulation by EBFC at the nano-Ampere range enhances sperm motility that can potentially allow the development of a new therapeutic tool for male infertility, including poor motility. EBFC was set up with three different electrical currents (112 nA/cm2 and 250 nA/cm2) at two different times (1 h, 2 h). Each sample was evaluated for its motility by computer-assisted sperm analyses and sperm viability testing. In the expanded study, we used the optimal electrical current of the EBFC system to treat asthenozoospermia and sperm with 0% motility. Results showed that optimal electrical stimulation schemes with EBFCs enhanced sperm motility by 30-40% compared with controls. Activated spermatozoa led to tyrosine phosphorylation in the tail area of the sperm following the electrical stimulation in the nano-Ampere range. However, the electrically stimulated group did not exhibit increased acrosomal reaction rates compared with the control group. In cases related to asthenozoospermia, 40% of motility was recovered following the electrical stimulation at the nano-Ampere range. However, motility is not recovered in sperm with 0% motility. In conclusion, we found that sperm motility was enhanced by exposure to electrical currents in the nano-Ampere range induced by optimal EBFCs. Electrical stimulation enhanced the motility of the sperm though tyrosine phosphorylation in spermatozoa. Therefore, our results show that electrical currents in the nano-Ampere range can be potentially applied to male infertility therapy as enhancers of sperm motility in assisted reproductive technology.
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http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0228097PLOS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7032714PMC
April 2020

Author Correction: Performance of a glucose-reactive enzyme-based biofuel cell system for biomedical applications.

Sci Rep 2019 Nov 27;9(1):18044. Epub 2019 Nov 27.

Department of Chemistry, College of Natural Science, Dankook University, Chungnam, Cheonan, 31116, Republic of Korea.

An amendment to this paper has been published and can be accessed via a link at the top of the paper.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41598-019-54377-7DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6879505PMC
November 2019

Performance of a glucose-reactive enzyme-based biofuel cell system for biomedical applications.

Sci Rep 2019 07 26;9(1):10872. Epub 2019 Jul 26.

Department of Chemistry, College of Natural Science, Dankook University, Chungnam, Cheonan, 31116, Republic of Korea.

A glucose-reactive enzyme-based biofuel cell system (EBFC) was recently introduced in the scientific community for biomedical applications, such as implantable artificial organs and biosensors for drug delivery. Upon direct contact with tissues or organs, an implanted EBFC can exert effects that damage or stimulate intact tissue due to its byproducts or generated electrical cues, which have not been investigated in detail. Here, we perform a fundamental cell culture study using a glucose dehydrogenase (GDH) as an anode enzyme and bilirubin oxidase (BOD) as a cathode enzyme. The fabricated EBFC had power densities of 15.26 to 38.33 nW/cm depending on the enzyme concentration in media supplemented with 25 mM glucose. Despite the low power density, the GDH-based EBFC showed increases in cell viability (~150%) and cell migration (~90%) with a relatively low inflammatory response. However, glucose oxidase (GOD), which has been used as an EBFC anode enzyme, revealed extreme cytotoxicity (~10%) due to the lethal concentration of HO byproducts (~1500 µM). Therefore, with its cytocompatibility and cell-stimulating effects, the GDH-based EBFC is considered a promising implantable tool for generating electricity for biomedical applications. Finally, the GDH-based EBFC can be used for introducing electricity during cell culture and the fabrication of organs on a chip and a power source for implantable devices such as biosensors, biopatches, and artificial organs.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41598-019-47392-1DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6659637PMC
July 2019

Ultrasonic synthesis and characterization of poly(acrylamide)-co-poly(vinylimidazole)@MWCNTs composite for use as an electrochemical material.

Ultrason Sonochem 2018 May 21;43:73-79. Epub 2017 Nov 21.

Department of Chemistry, College of Natural Science, Dankook University, Anseo-Dong, Cheonan, Chungnam 31116, Republic of Korea. Electronic address:

Applying a nanocomposite to increase the conductivity of an electrode can facilitate electrochemical analysis. In this regard, multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) evenly dispersed in hydrophilic solution can play an important role in electrochemical bio-sensing due to their unique properties, such as their high electrical conductivity and ability to conjugate with hydrophilic enzymes. Herein, we report the simple ultrasonic synthesis of a highly dispersible, enzyme-binding nanocomposite, poly(acrylamide)-co-poly(vinyl imidazole) (7:1 mol ratio)-MWCNTs ([email protected]). This material, having a zeta potential of 36.6 ± 0.53 mV, was applied as a film to an electrode surface and stably bound with glucose oxidase to transfer an electron between the enzyme and electrode in the presence of glucose. The [email protected] composite, which was readily dispersed in deionized water, can be used as a biocompatible material for applications such as bio-sensing, point-of-care testing (POCT), and other health care functions.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ultsonch.2017.11.024DOI Listing
May 2018

A Simple Interfacial Platform for Homogeneous Electrochemical Immunoassays Using a Poly(Vinylimidazole)-Modified Electrode.

Sensors (Basel) 2016 Dec 29;17(1). Epub 2016 Dec 29.

Department of Chemistry, College of Natural Science, Dankook University, Anseo-Dong, Cheonan, Chungnam 330-714, Korea.

In this study, a homogeneous method featuring simple, one-step detection was developed to analyze hippuric acid (HA), a major metabolite of toluene. High sensitivity was achieved with the facile immobilization of poly(vinylimidazole) (PVI) on an indium tin oxide (ITO) electrode. Using a previously developed approach, pentacyanoferrate was coordinated with pyridyl- ligands, and the redox-active Fe(II/III) centers were bound to Ni(II) ions on the electrode via electrostatic cyanide bridges. The detection was accomplished by the competitive binding of free HA and pentacyanoferrate-(4-aminomethylpyridine-hippuric acid) (Fe-HA, the electron transfer mediator) to the HA antibody on the Ni(II) ions-modified PVI-ITO (Ni-PVI-ITO) electrode. The electrical and physicochemical characterization of the electrode was carried out by cyclic voltammetry, differential pulse voltammetry, field emission scanning electron microscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. At low mediator concentrations, the electrical signals were proportional to the HA concentration between 0.1 µg/mL and 1.0 mg/mL. The same method may be extended to other small organic molecules.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/s17010054DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5298627PMC
December 2016

Fabrication of Inverted Colloidal Crystal Poly(ethylene glycol) Scaffold: A Three-dimensional Cell Culture Platform for Liver Tissue Engineering.

J Vis Exp 2016 Aug 27(114). Epub 2016 Aug 27.

School of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanyang Technological University; School of Chemical and Biomedical Engineering, Nanyang Technological University;

The ability to maintain hepatocyte function in vitro, for the purpose of testing xenobiotics' cytotoxicity, studying virus infection and developing drugs targeted at the liver, requires a platform in which cells receive proper biochemical and mechanical cues. Recent liver tissue engineering systems have employed three-dimensional (3D) scaffolds composed of synthetic or natural hydrogels, given their high water retention and their ability to provide the mechanical stimuli needed by the cells. There has been growing interest in the inverted colloidal crystal (ICC) scaffold, a recent development, which allows high spatial organization, homotypic and heterotypic cell interaction, as well as cell-extracellular matrix (ECM) interaction. Herein, we describe a protocol to fabricate the ICC scaffold using poly (ethylene glycol) diacrylate (PEGDA) and the particle leaching method. Briefly, a lattice is made from microsphere particles, after which a pre-polymer solution is added, properly polymerized, and the particles are then removed, or leached, using an organic solvent (e.g., tetrahydrofuran). The dissolution of the lattice results in a highly porous scaffold with controlled pore sizes and interconnectivities that allow media to reach cells more easily. This unique structure allows high surface area for the cells to adhere to as well as easy communication between pores, and the ability to coat the PEGDA ICC scaffold with proteins also shows a marked effect on cell performance. We analyze the morphology of the scaffold as well as the hepatocarcinoma cell (Huh-7.5) behavior in terms of viability and function to explore the effect of ICC structure and ECM coatings. Overall, this paper provides a detailed protocol of an emerging scaffold that has wide applications in tissue engineering, especially liver tissue engineering.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3791/54331DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5091954PMC
August 2016

Disposable Non-Enzymatic Glucose Sensors Using Screen-Printed Nickel/Carbon Composites on Indium Tin Oxide Electrodes.

Sensors (Basel) 2015 Dec 10;15(12):31083-91. Epub 2015 Dec 10.

Department of Nanobiomedical Sciences and BK21 PLUS NBM Global Research Center for Regenerative Medicine, Dankook University, Anseo-Dong, Cheonan, Chungnam 330-714, Korea.

Disposable screen-printed nickel/carbon composites on indium tin oxide (ITO) electrodes (DSPNCE) were developed for the detection of glucose without enzymes. The DSPNCE were prepared by screen-printing the ITO substrate with a 50 wt% nickel/carbon composite, followed by curing at 400 °C for 30 min. The redox couple of Ni(OH)₂/NiOOH was deposited on the surface of the electrodes via cyclic voltammetry (CV), scanning from 0-1.5 V for 30 cycles in 0.1 M NaOH solution. The DSPNCE were characterized by field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and electrochemical methods. The resulting electrical currents, measured by CV and chronoamperometry at 0.65 V vs. Ag/AgCl, showed a good linear response with glucose concentrations from 1.0-10 mM. Also, the prepared electrodes showed no interference from common physiologic interferents such as uric acid (UA) or ascorbic acid (AA). Therefore, this approach allowed the development of a simple, disposable glucose biosensor.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/s151229846DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4721766PMC
December 2015

Electrical stimulation by enzymatic biofuel cell to promote proliferation, migration and differentiation of muscle precursor cells.

Biomaterials 2015 18;53:358-69. Epub 2015 Mar 18.

Department of Nanobiomedical Sciences and BK21 PLUS NBM Global Research Center for Regenerative Medicine, Dankook University, Cheonan 330-713, Republic of Korea; Institute of Tissue Regeneration Engineering, Dankook University, Cheonan 330-714, Republic of Korea; Department of Biomaterials Science, College of Dentistry, Dankook University, Cheonan 330-714, Republic of Korea. Electronic address:

Electrical stimulation is a very important biophysical cue for skeletal muscle maintenance and myotube formation. The absence of electrical signals from motor neurons causes denervated muscles to atrophy. Herein, we investigate for the first time the utility of an enzymatic biofuel cell (EBFC) as a promising means for mimicking native electrical stimulation. EBFC was set up using two different enzymes: one was glucose oxidase (GOX) used for the generation of anodic current followed by the oxidation of glucose; the other was Bilirubin oxidase (BOD) for the generation of cathodic current followed by the reduction of oxygen. We studied the behaviors of muscle precursor cells (MPCs) in terms of proliferation, migration and differentiation under different electrical conditions. The EBFC electrical stimulations significantly increased cell proliferation and migration. Furthermore, the electrical stimulations promoted the differentiation of cells into myotube formation based on expressions at the gene and protein levels. The EBFC set up, with its free forms adjustable to any implant design, was subsequently applied to the nanofiber scaffolding system. The MPCs were demonstrated to be stimulated in a similar manner as the 2D culture conditions, suggesting potential applications of the EBFC system for muscle repair and regeneration.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.biomaterials.2015.02.062DOI Listing
January 2016

Homogeneous electrochemical detection of hippuric acid in urine based on the osmium-antigen conjugate.

Chemphyschem 2013 Jul 15;14(10):2331-7. Epub 2013 Apr 15.

Department of Nanobiomedical Science & WCU Research Center, Dankook University, Cheonan 330-714, Republic of Korea.

A homogeneous electrochemical immunoassay is based on the interaction of osmium-antigen conjugate with its antibody. The novelty presented herein is the direct conjugation of the osmium complex to a small antigen and the application of the quantitative analysis of the antigen and its antibody as the electrical signal for homogeneous immunoassay. The small antigen chosen is hippuric acid (HA), a major urinary metabolite in toluene-exposed humans. As a redox mediator, [Os(4,4'-dimethoxy-2,2'-bipyridine)2(4-aminomethylpyridine-HA)Cl](+/2+) (Os-HA antigen) has been synthesized and characterized on screen-printed carbon electrodes. The synthesized Os-HA antigen shows reversible redox peaks at E(½)=0.056 V versus Ag/AgCl. The homogeneous competitive immunoassay relies on the interaction between Os-HA antigen conjugate and free antigen to its antibody, which can generate electrical signals linearly proportional to the free antigen monitored by cyclic voltammetry and differential pulse voltammetry in the range of 10 μg mL(-1) to 5.12 mg mL(-1). The cutoff concentration of HA in urine samples is 2.0 mg mL(-1), so the method can be used to develop a HA immunosensor. Moreover, the proposed homogeneous electrochemical immunoassay method can be applied to detect low concentrations of small antigens found in the healthcare area.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/cphc.201300039DOI Listing
July 2013
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