Publications by authors named "Wolfram Kluwe"

9 Publications

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Safety of tunneled central venous catheters in pediatric hematopoietic stem cell recipients with severe primary immunodeficiency diseases.

PLoS One 2020 15;15(5):e0233016. Epub 2020 May 15.

Department of Pediatric Surgery, University Hospital of Freiburg, Freiburg, Germany.

Tunneled central venous catheters (TCVCs) provide prolonged intravenous access for pediatric patients with severe primary immunodeficiency disease (PID) undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). However, little is known about the epidemiology and clinical significance of TCVC-related morbidity in this particular patient group. We conducted the retrospective analysis of patients with severe PID who received percutaneous landmark-guided TCVC implantation prior to HSCT. We analyzed 92 consecutive TCVC implantations in 69 patients (median [interquartile range] age 3.0 [0-11] years) with severe combined immune deficiency (n = 39, 42.4%), chronic granulomatous disease (n = 17, 18.4%), and other rare PID syndromes (n = 36, 39.2%). The median length of TCVC observation was 144.1 (85.5-194.6) days with a total of 14,040 catheter days at risk (cdr). The overall rate of adverse events during catheter insertion was 17.4% (n = 16) and 25.0% during catheter dwell period (n = 23, catheter risk [CR] per 1000 cdr = 1.64). The most common complication was TCVC-related infection with an overall prevalence of 9.8% (n = 9, CR = 0.64), followed by late dislocation (n = 6, 6.5%, CR = 0.43), early dislocation (n = 4, 4.3%) and catheter dysfunction (n = 4, 4.3%, CR = 0.28). TCVCs are safe in children with severe PID undergoing HSCT with relatively low rates of TCVC-related infection.
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http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0233016PLOS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7228048PMC
August 2020

Lipid Apheresis to Manage Severe Hypertriglyceridemia during Induction Therapy in a Child with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia.

Pediatr Hematol Oncol 2020 Sep 6;37(6):530-538. Epub 2020 May 6.

Department of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine, Division of Pediatric Hematology and Oncology, Medical Center, Faculty of Medicine, University of Freiburg, Freiburg, Germany.

PEG asparaginase is an important and established drug in the treatment of pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Severe hypertriglyceridemia is a rare complication of PEG asparaginase in combination with glucocorticoids. We report a case of excessive hypertriglyceridemia in a child during ALL induction therapy successfully treated by lipid apheresis and give a literature review on the management of hypertriglyceridemia in children treated for ALL.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/08880018.2020.1756999DOI Listing
September 2020

The outcome of Bishop-Koop procedure compared to divided stoma in neonates with meconium ileus, congenital intestinal atresia and necrotizing enterocolitis.

Medicine (Baltimore) 2019 Jul;98(27):e16304

Department of Pediatric Surgery, University Hospital of Freiburg, Freiburg, Germany.

To determine the potential value and suitability of Bishop-Koop procedure (BK) compared to divided stoma (DS) in neonates with meconium ileus (MI), congenital intestinal atresia (CIA), and necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC).A retrospective data collection from 2000 to 2019 on neonates undergoing BK and DS formation and closure for MI, CIA, and NEC was conducted. Ostomy related complications following both procedures were analyzed.One hundred two consecutive patients managed with a BK (n = 57, 55.8%) and DS (n = 45, 44.2%) for MI (n = 38, 37.2%), CIA (n = 31, 30.5%), and NEC (n = 33, 32.3%) were analyzed. Mean operating time for ostomy creation did not differ significantly between BK and DS groups (156 ± 54 vs 135 ± 66.8 min, P = .08). The prevalence of stoma-related complications following BK and DS formation was 8.7% and 31.1%, respectively (P = .005). The complication rate after BK and DS closure was 3.5% and 6.7%, respectively (P = .65). The operating time for ostomy reversal and length of hospital stay after stoma closure were significantly shorter in BK group (82.2 ± 51.4 vs 183 ± 84.5 min and 5.5 ± 2.7 vs 11.3 ± 3.9 days, P < .001).BK procedure is safe, reliable, and suitable technique in neonatal surgery with low complications rate following ostomy creation as well as shorter operating time and length of hospital stay after ostomy closure compared to DS ostomies. Surgeons should keep this technique as an alternative approach in their repertoire.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/MD.0000000000016304DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6635230PMC
July 2019

Outcome of landmark-guided percutaneously inserted tunneled central venous catheters in infants and children under 3 years with cancer.

Pediatr Blood Cancer 2018 10 26;65(10):e27295. Epub 2018 Jun 26.

Department of Pediatric Surgery, University Hospital of Freiburg, Freiburg, Germany.

Background: There is a paucity of information on procedural and long-term outcomes of tunneled central venous catheters (TCVC) in infants and children younger than 3 years undergoing anticancer therapy. This study aims to evaluate the success, safety, and complications leading to surgical revision or premature removal of TCVC in this particular patient group.

Methods: The clinical course of pediatric patients with percutaneous inserted TCVC, including Groshong (GC) and Hickman/Broviac (HB) catheters, has been analyzed retrospectively. The data analysis includes patient and device characteristics, adverse events during insertion, and dwell period complications.

Results: A consecutive series of 238 children undergoing implantation of 273 TCVC, including 148 (54.2%) GC and 125 (45.8%) HB catheters, with a total of 38,209 catheter days at risk (cdr) were reviewed. The patient cohort consisted of 65 (23.8%) infants, 77 (28.2%) children aged 1-2 years, and 131 (48.0%) aged 2-3 years. The overall rate of adverse events during catheter insertion was 12.8% (n = 35) with no differences between age groups or devices. The overall rate of long-term complication was 28.2% (n = 77, catheter risk [CR] per 1,000 cdr = 1.75), with the highest prevalence in infants (P = 0.01). The most common complication was late dislocation (n = 24, 8.8%, CR = 0.47), followed by early dislocation (n = 20, 7.3%) and infection (n = 18, 7.4%, CR = 0.42).

Conclusion: Percutaneous landmark-guided insertion of TCVC in neonates and small children with cancer is safe. Patterns of long-term complications are different from those for older children and should be prevented through appropriate management.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/pbc.27295DOI Listing
October 2018

[Wound management for cuts and lacerations].

Authors:
Wolfram Kluwe

Med Monatsschr Pharm 2015 Feb;38(2):48-53; quiz 55-6

Skin cuts and lacerations are frequent injuries. A perfect result of the treatment is going without saying for the patient and its relatives. But there are some aspects to note for an adequate wound management. The main aims of wound management are clear: assist in hemostasis, to avoid infection and pain, and to ensure an esthetically pleasing scar. For these we have to treat not only the wound. Taking care for the hole patient and treating the sore pain and preventing painfull manipulations is the goal for the patients satisfaction. The basic aspects of wound healing and wound management will be described. Sutures, tissue adhesives, staples, and skin-closure tapes are options in the outpatient setting. Although suturing is the preferred method for laceration repair, tissue adhesives are similar in patient satisfaction, infection rates, and scarring risk in low skin-tension areas and may be also more cost-effective. Patient education and appropriate procedural coding are important after the repair. Please do not forget in every case to ask for the tetanus immunization and to think about an antibiotic therapy in case of human or animal bites and for wounds in risk areas and with contamination.
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February 2015

Fetal megacystis: experience of a single tertiary center in Switzerland over 20 years.

Fetal Diagn Ther 2014 14;36(3):215-22. Epub 2014 Jun 14.

Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Bern, Inselspital, Bern, Switzerland.

Objectives: Megacystis (MC) is rare and often associated with other structural and chromosomal anomalies. In euploid cases with early oligohydramnios, prognosis is poor mainly due to pulmonary hypoplasia and renal damage. We report our experience of the past 20 years.

Methods: A retrospective review of cases with prenatally diagnosed MC was performed. Complete prenatal as well as postnatal medical records from 1989 to 2009 were reviewed focusing on diagnostic precision, fetal interventions [vesicocentesis (VC), vesicoamniotic shunt (VAS)], short- and long-term outcome, and potential prognostic factors.

Results: 68 cases were included. Follow-up was available in 54 cases (9 girls and 45 boys including 3 cases with aneuploidy). We found 39 isolated MC at sonography (5 girls and 34 boys). 24 fetuses with isolated MC underwent VC and VAS at 19.6 ± 6.3 and 20 ± 4.9 weeks of gestation, respectively. Survival rate was higher in male than in female fetuses (51 vs. 33%). Renal problems occurred in 4/14 prenatally treated fetuses and in 1/10 when cases with prune belly syndrome (PBS) were excluded from the analysis.

Conclusions: Our study shows that a careful selection of cases with MC excluding fetuses with PBS and early treatment has still the potential to improve outcome.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000358300DOI Listing
June 2015

Community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus-infected chronic scalp wound with exposed dura in a 10-year-old boy: vacuum-assisted closure is a feasible option: case report.

Neurosurgery 2011 May;68(5):E1481-3; discussion E1484

Pediatric Surgery, Children's Hospital, University Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland.

Background And Importance: Since the introduction of vacuum-assisted closure (VAC) in 1997, it has been used successfully in treating difficult wounds, including spinal wounds and wounds in pediatric patients. There are no reports on VAC therapy in pediatric patients on the scalp, especially with exposed dura. This report describes a 10-year-old boy with a chronic wound of the scalp with exposed dura after multiple neurosurgical interventions who was treated successfully with VAC.

Clinical Presentation: A 10-year-old mentally disabled boy with Apert syndrome suffered from a chronic wound with community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infection after multiple neurosurgeon operations. For wound closure, VAC therapy was initiated on the bony defect with exposed dura. The wound healed successfully, and the MRSA disappeared.

Conclusion: The aims of VAC therapy are formation of new granulation tissue, wound cleansing, and bacterial clearance. In this case, the VAC device was excellent for temporary coverage of the defect and for wound cleaning, and it allowed a thick bed of granulation tissue to form over the dura, even with minimal constant negative pressure. The application and management were feasible even in a mentally disabled child. With this experience, we are encouraged to use the VAC device in difficult wounds, even in the head and neck area in children, and to bring this treatment into the outpatient clinic.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1227/NEU.0b013e318210c7fbDOI Listing
May 2011

Local resection of metanephric adenoma with kidney preservation.

J Pediatr Surg 2009 Aug;44(8):E21-3

Department for Paediatric Surgery, Inselspital, University of Berne, 3010 Berne, Switzerland.

Metanephric adenoma (MA) is a rare renal neoplasm present at any age. Usually, a total nephrectomy is performed. Some successful partial nephrectomies or selective tumor resections are described in adults but not in children. We present here the case of a 15-month-old boy, the youngest patient yet to be reported with an MA. We performed a local resection of the tumor. Today, 2 1/2 years after surgery, we can document a favorable clinical course and normal ultrasound findings in the follow-up of the operated kidney. This case gives further evidence that organ-sparing resection of MA is feasible in selected cases. A close clinical and ultrasound follow-up is mandatory for this approach.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jpedsurg.2009.05.028DOI Listing
August 2009

Duplication and exstrophy of the bladder with clitoris and vagina duplex as well as uterus bicornis.

Urology 2007 Sep;70(3):591.e1-2

Department of Surgical Pediatrics, Children's Hospital, Inselspital, University of Bern, Bern, Switzerland.

The variants of bladder exstrophy with duplication of the bladder are extremely rare and associated with further malformations of the genitourinary system. Initially, the clinical appearance is that of a classic exstrophy. In this case a second, regularly configured bladder with a normal supravesical urinary tract was found covered by an omphalocele like a cutaneous bag. At the same time, there was a duplication of the vagina and a bicornuate uterus. The surgical treatment, aiming at anatomic reconstruction of the genitourinary system and closure of the symphysis, was successfully performed without any complication.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.urology.2007.07.026DOI Listing
September 2007