Publications by authors named "Wissem Dhahbi"

15 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Epidemiology and Risk Factors of Table-Tennis-Related Injuries: Findings from a Scoping Review of the Literature.

Medicina (Kaunas) 2022 Apr 21;58(5). Epub 2022 Apr 21.

Department of Surgery, Oncology and Gastroenterology (DiSCOG), University of Padova, 35128 Padova, Italy.

Table tennis represents one of the fastest ball games in the world and, as such, is characterized by unique physiological demands. Despite its popularity, there is a dearth of data related to table-tennis-related risk factors and injuries. Therefore, the present review was conducted to fill in this gap of knowledge. The present review was designed as a scoping review. Eleven online databases were searched with no language/date limitations. Forty-two investigations were retained in the present review. These studies indicated that tenosynovitis, benign muscle injuries, strains, and sprains were the most common injury types. In order, the most commonly affected anatomical regions were the lower limb, shoulder, spine, knee, upper limb, and trunk. When comparing the injury occurrence between training and competition, the results were contradictory. National/international athletes had higher indices of injury than regional players, even though other investigations failed to replicate such findings. According to some scholars, there was a difference between female and male athletes: in females, more injuries involved the upper limbs when compared to men who had more injuries to the lower limbs, while other studies did not find differences in terms of gender. Table tennis is generally considered at lower risk for injuries than other sports. However, the present scoping review showed that injuries can occur and affect a variety of anatomic regions. Sports scientists/physicians could utilize the information contained in the current review for devising ad hoc programs to adopt an effective/appropriate prevention strategy and to monitor table tennis players' training load and to achieve maximal fitness, as these will reduce the risk of injuries. However, most of the studies included in our scoping review are methodologically weak or of low-to-moderate evidence, being anecdotal or clinical case reports/case series, warranting caution when interpreting our findings and, above all, further high-quality research in the field is urgently needed.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/medicina58050572DOI Listing
April 2022

Bilateral deficit magnitude increases with velocity during a half-squat exercise.

J Sports Sci 2022 Apr 20:1-8. Epub 2022 Apr 20.

Department of Biomedical Sciences for Health (SCIBIS), Università degli Studi di Milano, Italy.

Movement velocity has been viewed as one of the bilateral deficit (BLD) determinants. This research tested the velocity effect on BLD during a half-squat exercise. The role of muscle excitation in BLD was also assessed. BLD amplitude was assessed in 12 male soccer players while performing a half-squat exercise with incremental load. During the exercise's pushing phase, the average force and velocity were measured in bilateral and unilateral conditions to provide the bilateral index (BI) at each interpolated velocity. The and excitation was assessed during the exercise by calculating the surface electromyography signal root mean square (sEMG). The BI for sEMG (sEMG BI) was calculated. The theoretical maximum force (F) and velocity (v) were also determined. F was +43 (28)% in bilateral compared with unilateral conditions ( < 0.001), whereas v was similar in both conditions ( = 0.386). The BI magnitude rose with the increase in velocity from -34 (7)% at 50%v to -70 (17)% at 90%v ( 0.03-<0.001), whereas no sEMG BI occurred (: 0.07-0.991 in both muscles). The study reported velocity-dependent changes in the BLD amplitude, with the largest BLD amplitudes occurring at the highest velocities. This behaviour could provide useful information for setting specific contraction velocities to exploit/limit the BLD amplitude as a possible training stimulus.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/02640414.2022.2051304DOI Listing
April 2022

External Responsiveness of the SuperOp Device to Assess Recovery After Exercise: A Pilot Study.

Front Sports Act Living 2020 14;2:67. Epub 2020 Jul 14.

Faculty of Kinesiology, University of Split, Split, Croatia.

Post-exercise recovery is a complex process involving a return of performance and a physiological or perceptual feeling close to pre-exercise . The hypothesis of this study is that the device investigated here is effective in evaluating the recovery state of professional cyclists in order to plan effective training. Ten professional male cyclists belonging to the same team were enrolled in this study. Participants performed a 7-day exercise program [D1, D4, and D7: low-intensity training; D2 and D5: passive recovery; D3: oxygen consumption (VO) test (for mechanical power assessment only); and D6: constant load test]. During the week of monitoring, each morning before getting up, the device assessed each participant's so-called Organic Readiness {OR [arbitrary unit (a.u.)]}, based on blood pressure (BP), heart rate (HR), features of past exercise session, and following self-perceived condition. Based on its readings and algorithm, the device graphically displayed four different colors/values, indicating general exercise recommendations: green/3 = "you can train hard," yellow/2 = "you can train averagely," orange/1 = "you can train lightly," or red/0 = "you should recover passively." During the week of research, morning OR values and Bonferroni comparisons showed significant differences between days and, namely, values (1) D2 (after low intensity training) was higher than D4 (after VO test; = 0.033 and = 1.296) and (2) D3 and D6 (after passive recovery) were higher than D4 (after VO test; = 0.006 and = 2.519) and D5 (after low intensity training; = 0.033 and = 1.341). The receiver operating characteristic analysis area under curve (AUC) recorded a result of 0.727 and could differentiate between D3 and D4 with a sensitivity and a specificity of 80%. Preliminarily, the device investigated is a sufficiently effective and sensitive/specific device to assess the recovery state of athletes in order to plan effective training.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fspor.2020.00067DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7739672PMC
July 2020

Validity and Reliability of a New Specific Parkour Test: Physiological and Performance Responses.

Front Physiol 2019 30;10:1362. Epub 2019 Oct 30.

Sport Science Program, College of Arts and Sciences, Qatar University, Doha, Qatar.

Main aim of this study was examining validity and reliability of using a new specific Parkour repeated sprint ability test (SPRSA) for assessing repeated sprint ability while facing obstacles and establishing between-day reliability and sensitivity of SPRSA related to its physiological and performance responses. Thirteen high-level traceurs (three females) performed in random order and twice eight tests for assessing a total of 23 variables: SPRSA (a typical maximal-speed shuttle run interspersed with four Parkour competition-common fundamentals) and seven established fitness tests, core stability, hand-grip, vertical-jump, long-jump, pull-up, 300-m shuttle run (as a field test for anaerobic capacity), and Leger test. Except for muscular elasticity index of vertical jump test (intra-class Correlation Coefficient model 3,1 [ICC,] = 0.54 []), fitness tests' ICC,s resulted (ICC,: 0.93-1.00). SPRSA total time and time of its fastest sprint (SPRSA peak time) were significantly correlated with the majority of core stability (: -0.79 to 0.59; < 0.01-0.05), jumping (: -0.78 to 0.67; < 0.01-0.05), pull-up tests (: -0.86; < 0.01), 300-m shuttle run test total time (: 0.77-0.82; < 0.01), and Leger test-estimated VO max (: -0.78; < 0.01). Principal component analysis (PCA) of the 23 variables led to extraction of four significant components (each due to different variables' combinations), which explained 90.2% of 23 variables' total variance. SPRSA (i.e., total and peak time) showed high reliability (ICC,: 0.991-0.998 and standard-error-of-measurement %: 0.07-0.32). Finally, SPRSA showed high sensitivity (smallest-worthwhile-change %: 0.29-0.68). Considering its excellent logical and strong ecological validity, SPRSA may serve as a valid specific field test for Parkour sport. In addition, thanks to its high reliability and sensitivity, this test is suitable for monitoring, evaluating, and programming training processes for Parkour practitioners in repeated sprint ability involving crossing obstacles.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fphys.2019.01362DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6831735PMC
October 2019

Warm-Up With Dynamic Stretching: Positive Effects on Match-Measured Change of Direction Performance in Young Elite Volleyball Players.

Int J Sports Physiol Perform 2019 Nov 6:1-6. Epub 2019 Nov 6.

Purpose: To explore the immediate (15-s post-warm-up) and the delayed (after 20 and 40 min of simulated volleyball play) effects of 2 different warm-up protocols-a stretching-free volleyball warm-up (NS) and a warm-up incorporating dynamic stretching (DS)-on subsequent change of direction (COD) performance in young elite volleyball players.

Methods: Sixteen male players (age 16.88 [0.34] y, body mass 75.81 [5.41] kg, body height 1.91 [0.05] m, body mass index 20.84 [1.79] kg·m-2, and body fat percentage 9.48 [1.83]%) from the U-17 national volleyball team performed NS and DS on 2 different nonconsecutive days. During each testing session (NS and DS), half T-test performance measurements were performed after 5 minutes of a general warm-up (ie, baseline), immediately post-warm-up (after 15 s), and after 20 and 40 minutes of simulated volleyball play.

Results: For DS, a significant improvement in COD performance (2.08%, P < .001) was observed after 20 minutes of play compared with the baseline values. In addition, COD performance recorded after 40 minutes of play was better than after 15-second post-warm-up (5.85%, P = .001). Inferential statistics showed better COD performance in the DS condition after 20 minutes of play (2.32%, likely negative, d = 0.61).

Conclusions: Compared with NS, DS tended to affect the pattern of improvement of COD performance during play by intensifying and accelerating it. Consequently, to enhance COD performance for up to 40 minutes into the game, it is recommended that DS be incorporated to the warm-up preceding the match.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1123/ijspp.2019-0117DOI Listing
November 2019

Dynamic Warm-Up With a Weighted Vest: Improvement of Repeated Change-of-Direction Performance in Young Male Soccer Players.

Int J Sports Physiol Perform 2020 02 16;15(2):196-203. Epub 2019 Oct 16.

Purpose: To explore the effect of 4 different warm-up strategies using weighted vests and to determine the specific optimal recovery duration required to optimize the repeated change-of-direction (RCOD) performance in young soccer players.

Methods: A total of 19 male soccer players (age 18 [0.88] y, body mass 69.85 [7.68] kg, body height 1.75 [0.07] m, body mass index 22.87 [2.23] kg·m-2, and body fat percentage 12.53% [2.59%]) completed the following loaded warm-up protocols in a randomized, counterbalanced cross-over, within-participants order and on separate days: weighted vest with a loading of 5% (WUV5%), 10% (WUV10%), 15% (WUV15%) body mass, and an unloaded condition (control). RCOD performance (total time, peak time, and fatigue index) was collected during the preintervention phase (5 min after the dynamic stretching sequence) for baseline values and immediately (at 15 min), at 4- and 8-minute postwarm-up intervention.

Results: For each postwarm-up tested, recovery times (ie, 15 s, 4 min, and 8 min), of both total and peak times were faster following WUV5%, WUV10%, and WUV15%, compared with the unloaded condition (P ≤.001-.031, d = 1.28-2.31 [large]). There were no significant differences (P = .09-1.00, d = 0.03-0.72 [trivial-moderate]) in-between recovery times in both total and peak times following WUV5%, WUV10%, and WUV15%. However, baseline fatigue index score was significantly worse than all other scores (P ≤.001-.002, d = 1.35-2.46 [large]) following the loaded conditions.

Conclusions: The findings demonstrated that a dynamic loaded warm-up increases an athlete's initial RCOD performance up to the 8-minute postwarm-up intervention. Therefore, strength coaches need to consider using weighted vests during the warm-up for trained athletes in order to acutely optimize RCODs.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1123/ijspp.2018-0800DOI Listing
February 2020

Seasonal weather conditions affect training program efficiency and physical performance among special forces trainees: A long-term follow-up study.

PLoS One 2018 18;13(10):e0206088. Epub 2018 Oct 18.

Athlete Health and Performance Research Centre, ASPETAR, Qatar Orthopaedic and Sports Medicine Hospital, Doha, Qatar.

The purpose of the present investigation was to follow-up the effect of specific commandos' training-cycles (SCTCs) on upper-body strength resistance and running endurance performance, as well as determine whether variation in seasonal parameters has any effect on physical performance. Fourteen SCTCs were held over eight years, involving 466 participants. Participants were assigned to four subgroups according to their distribution over the seasons: summer (n = 124), autumn (n = 145), winter (n = 52) and spring (n = 145). Before and after each SCTC, four tests (maximal pull-up, push-up and sit-up repetitions in 70-seconds for muscle strength resistance) and a 5-km cross-country run (endurance) were performed. Seasonal data were continuously recorded during all SCTCs. Body mass decreased significantly (p<0.05) in all groups following SCTCs. These training-cycles induced a significant increase (p<0.05) in the 70-seconds push-ups, pull-ups and sit-ups and a decrease (p<0.01) in the 5-km cross-country running time among all trainees. The main effect of the season was present in all tests (p<0.01). With regard to the percentage of changes, the results from the 70-seconds push-up, pull-up and sit-up tests were significantly higher in winter and spring (p<0.01) compared with the two other seasons, while 5-km cross-country performance improvements were significantly higher (p<0.01) in spring and summer, compared to the two other seasons. In summary,14-week of SCTCs improved upper-body strength resistance and running endurance performance in the commandos. Improvements in strength resistance performance were greater during cool weather (winter and spring), while improvements in running endurance performance were higher during hotter (spring and summer) seasons.
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http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0206088PLOS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6193725PMC
March 2019

Kinetic analysis of push-up exercises: a systematic review with practical recommendations.

Sports Biomech 2022 Jan 4;21(1):1-40. Epub 2018 Oct 4.

Athlete Health and Performance Research Centre, Aspetar, QATAR Orthopaedic and Sports Medicine Hospital, Doha, Qatar.

Push-ups represent one of the simplest and most popular strengthening exercise. The aim of this study was to systematically review and critically appraise the literature on the kinetics-related characteristics of different types of push-ups, with the objective of optimising training prescription and exercise-related load. A systematic search was conducted in the electronic databases PubMed, Google Scholar and Science Direct up to April 2018. Studies that reported kinetic data (e.g. initial and peak-force supported by the upper-limbs, impact-force, peak-flexion-moment of the elbow-joint, rate of propulsive- and impact-, and vertebral-joint compressive-forces) related to push-ups and included trained, recreational and untrained participants, were considered. The risk of bias in the included studies was assessed using the Critical Appraisal Skills Programme scale. From 5290 articles retrieved in the initial search, only 26 studies were included in this review. Kinetic data for 46 push-up variants were assessed. A limitation of the current review is that the relationship between our findings and actual clinical or practical consequences is not statistically proven but can only be inferred from our critical descriptive approach. Overall, this review provides detailed data on specific characteristics and intensities of push-up variations, in order to optimise exercise prescription for training and rehabilitation purposes.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/14763141.2018.1512149DOI Listing
January 2022

Explosive Push-ups: From Popular Simple Exercises to Valid Tests for Upper-Body Power.

J Strength Cond Res 2020 Oct;34(10):2877-2885

Athlete Health and Performance Research Center, ASPETAR, Qatar Orthopaedic and Sports Medicine Hospital, Doha, Qatar.

Zalleg, D, Ben Dhahbi, A, Dhahbi, W, Sellami, M, Padulo, J, Souaifi, M, Bešlija, T, and Chamari, K. Explosive push-ups: From popular simple exercises to valid tests for upper-body power. J Strength Cond Res 34(10): 2877-2885, 2020-The purpose of this study was to assess the logical and ecological validity of 5 explosive push-up variations as a means of upper-body power assessment, using the factorial characterization of ground reaction force-based (GRF-based) parameter outputs. Thirty-seven highly active commando soldiers (age: 23.3 ± 1.5 years; body mass: 78.7 ± 9.7 kg; body height: 179.7 ± 4.3 cm) performed 3 trials of 5 variations of the explosive push-up in a randomized-counterbalanced order: (a) standard countermovement push-up, (b) standard squat push-up, (c) kneeling countermovement push-up, (d) kneeling squat push-up, and (e) drop-fall push-up. Vertical GRF was measured during these exercises using a portable force plate. The initial force-supported, peak-GRF and rate of force development during takeoff, flight time, impact force, and rate of force development impact on landing were measured. A significant relationship between initial force-supported and peak-GRF takeoff was observed for the countermovement push-up (CMP) exercises (standard countermovement push-up, kneeling countermovement push-up, and drop-fall push-up) and squat push-up (SP) exercises (standard squat push-up and kneeling squat push-up) (r = 0.58 and r = 0.80, respectively; p < 0.01). Furthermore, initial force supported was also negatively correlated to a significant degree with flight time for both CMP and SP (r = -0.74 and r = -0.80; p < 0.01, respectively). Principal component analysis (PCA) showed that the abovementioned 6 GRF-based variables resulted in the extraction of 3 significant components, which explained 88.9% of the total variance for CMP, and 2 significant components, which explained 71.0% of the total variance for SP exercises. In summary, the PCA model demonstrated a great predictive power in accounting for GRF-based parameters of explosive push-up exercises, allowing for stronger logical and ecological validity as tests of upper-body power. Furthermore, it is possible to adjust the intensity level of the push-up exercise by altering the starting position (i.e., standard vs. kneeling).
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1519/JSC.0000000000002774DOI Listing
October 2020

Reliability, Sensitivity, and Minimal Detectable Change of a New Specific Climbing Test for Assessing Asymmetry in Reach Technique.

J Strength Cond Res 2021 Feb;35(2):527-534

University of Split, Faculty of Kinesiology, Split, Croatia.

Abstract: Čular, D, Dhahbi, W, Kolak, I, Iacono, AD, Bešlija, T, Laffaye, G, and Padulo, J. Reliability, sensitivity, and minimal detectable change of a new specific climbing test for assessing asymmetry in reach technique. J Strength Cond Res 35(2): 527-534, 2021-The aims of this study were to establish intertrial and intersession reliability, sensitivity, and minimal detectable change of a new climbing test specifically for assessing asymmetry in reach technique (TEST). Twenty-four young climbers (16 males and 8 females) participated in this study. The protocol consisted of performing, in counterbalanced random order, 3 tests; TEST, maximum handgrip force, and squat on the bench, in 2 sessions (with 3 trials for each session). TEST performance was expressed as: TEST performance for left hand (TESTL), TEST performance for right hand (TESTR), and absolute symmetry index (ASI). For intertrial and intersession reliability assessment, TESTL and TESTR showed excellent reliability (intraclass correlation coefficients ranged: 0.96-1.00; SEM% ranged: 0.07-1.23; and coefficient of variation-CV%: 1.28-2.53). In addition, SEMs were smaller than the smallest worthwhile change (SWC) values (SWC% = 1.07 and 0.99 for TESTL and TESTR, respectively), and the minimal detectable change (MDC95) for both sides was small (<4.36 cm). An exception was ASI, which showed low absolute reliability and marginal sensitivity (SEM% = 15.13 > SWC% = 8.40 and CV% = 41.98). Pairwise test comparisons revealed no difference between sides. Considering the high reliability and the satisfactory sensitivity, TEST can be used to define individual asymmetry in the performance of the reach technique to the left or the right body side in climbers. However, interpreting data using the ASI index requires caution because it had poor absolute reliability and marginal sensitivity.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1519/JSC.0000000000002694DOI Listing
February 2021

The effect of acute and chronic exercise on steroid hormone fluctuations in young and middle-aged men.

Steroids 2018 04 1;132:18-24. Epub 2018 Feb 1.

Faculty of Kinesiology, University of Split, Split, Croatia.

The current study examine the effects of combined sprint and resistance training on serum total testosterone (TT), sex-hormone-binding globulin (SHBG) and cortisol (C), at rest, and in response to the Wingate Anaerobic-Test (WAnT) in 21 and 41 years old men. Forty moderately-trained men were randomly assigned to a young trained (YT), young control (YC), middle-aged trained (MAT), and middle-aged control (MAC) group. Before (P1), and after (P2) training, blood samples were collected at rest and after exercise. At P1, higher C and lower TT was observed in middle-aged groups compared to younger ones (P < 0.05). At P2, basal TT increased significantly (P < 0.05) in MAT and the age-difference was absent between trained groups (P > 0.05). Basal SHBG decreased significantly in YT at P2 (P < 0.05) but did not change in other groups from before to after training (P > 0.05). Free-testosterone was significantly (P < 0.05) higher in young compared to middle-aged groups at P1, but at P2, this age-related difference disappeared between YT and MAT (P > 0.05). C post-WAnT increased significantly for MAT only (P < 0.05) at P2, whilst no significant changes were observed in the other three groups (P < 0.05) at P2. In contrast, resting levels of C did not change in all groups at P2 (P > 0.05). The current study demonstrates that this training intervention may help increase steroids hormones in middle-aged men and counteract the negative effect of age on TT and free testosterone.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.steroids.2018.01.011DOI Listing
April 2018

Combined sprint and resistance training abrogates age differences in somatotropic hormones.

PLoS One 2017 11;12(8):e0183184. Epub 2017 Aug 11.

Tunisian Research Laboratory "Sport Performance Optimization" National Center of Medicine and Science in Sports, Tunis, Tunisia.

The aim of this investigation was to compare serum growth hormone (GH), insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) and insulin-like growth factor-binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3) in response to a combined sprint and resistance training (CSRT) program in young and middle-aged men.Thirty-eight healthy, moderately trained men participated in this study. Young and middle-aged men were randomly assigned to, a young training group (YT = 10, 21.4±1.2yrs) ora young control group (YC = 9, 21.6±1.8 yrs), a middle-aged training group (MAT = 10, 40.4±2.1 yrs) or a middle-aged control group (MAC = 9, 40.5±1.8 yrs). Participants performed the Wingate Anaerobic Test (WAnT) before and after a 13-week CSRT program (three sessions per week). Blood samples were collected at rest, after warm-up, immediately post-WAnT, and 10 min post-WAnT. CSRT induced increases in GH at rest and in response to the WAnT in YT and MAT (P<0.05). CSRT-induced increases were observed for IGF-1 and IGFBP-3 at rest in MAT only (P<0.05). Pre-training, GH, IGF-1 and IGFBP-3 were significantly higher at rest and in response to the WAnT in young participants as compared to their middle-aged counterparts (P<0.05). Post-training, YT and MAT had comparable basal GH (P>0.05). In response to the WAnT, amelioration of the age-effect was observed between YT and MAT for IGF-1 and IGF-1/IGFBP-3 ratio following CSRT (P>0.05). These data suggest that CSRT increases the activity of the GH/IGF-1 axis at rest and in response to the WAnT in young and middle-aged men. In addition, CSRT reduces the normal age-related decline of somatotropic hormones in middle-age men.
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http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0183184PLOS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5553853PMC
October 2017

The Effect of Variation of Plyometric Push-Ups on Force-Application Kinetics and Perception of Intensity.

Int J Sports Physiol Perform 2017 Feb 24;12(2):190-197. Epub 2016 Aug 24.

Purpose: To examine differences between ground-reaction-force (GRF)-based parameters collected from 5 types of plyometric push-ups. Between-trials reliability and the relationships between parameters were also assessed.

Methods: Thirty-seven highly active commando soldiers performed 3 trials of 5 variations of the plyometric push-up in a counterbalanced order: standard countermovement push-up (SCPu), standard squat push-up (SSPu), kneeling countermovement push-up (KCPu), kneeling squat push-up (KSPu), and drop-fall push-up (DFPu). Vertical GRF was measured during these exercises using a portable Kistler force plate. The GRF applied by the hands in the starting position (initial force supported), peak GRF and rate of force development during takeoff, flight time, impact force, and rate of force development impact on landing were determined.

Results: During standard-position exercises (SCPu and SSPu) the initial force supported and impact force were higher (P < .001) than with kneeling exercises (KCPu, KSPu, and DFPu). The peak GRF and rate of force development during takeoff were higher (P < .001) in the countermovement push-up exercises ([CMP] SCPu, KCPu, and DFPu) than squat push-up exercises ([SP] SSPu and KSPu). Furthermore, the flight time was greater (P < .001) during kneeling exercises than during standard-position exercises. A significant relationship (P < .01) between impact force and the rate of force development impact was observed for CMP and SP exercises (r = .83 and r = .62, respectively). The initial force supported was also negatively related (P < .01) to the flight time for both CMP and SP (r = -.74 and r = -.80, respectively). It was revealed that the initial force supported and the peak GRF during takeoff had excellent reliability; however, other parameters had poor absolute reliability.

Conclusions: It is possible to adjust the intensity of plyometric push-up exercises and train athletes' muscle power by correctly interpreting GRF-based parameters. However, caution is required as some parameters had marginal absolute reliability.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1123/ijspp.2016-0063DOI Listing
February 2017

External Responsiveness and Intrasession Reliability of the Rope-Climbing Test.

J Strength Cond Res 2016 Oct;30(10):2952-8

1Tunisian Research Laboratory "Sport Performance Optimisation," National Center of Medicine and Science in Sports (CNMSS), Tunis, Tunisia; 2Athlete Health and Performance Research Centre, ASPETAR, Qatar Orthopaedic and Sports Medicine Hospital, Doha, Qatar; 3University of Tunis El Manar, Science Faculty of Tunis, Tunisia; 4University of Lyon, F-69622, Lyon; IFSTTAR, LBMC, UMR_T9406, Bron; Lyon University 1, Villeurbanne, France; 5University Center of Bioengineering of the Human Neuromusculoskeletal System; 6School of Human Kinetics and Recreation, Memorial University of Newfoundland, St. John's, Newfoundland, Canada; and University; and 7Sports Performance Research Institute New Zealand (SPRINZ), AUT Millennium Institute, AUT University, Auckland, New Zealand.

Dhahbi, W, Chamari, K, Chèze, L, Behm, DG, and Chaouachi, A. External responsiveness and intrasession reliability of the rope-climbing test. J Strength Cond Res 30(10): 2952-2958, 2016-Although the rope-climbing test (RCT) has been validated for upper-body power assessment of Commando soldiers, the external responsiveness and intrasession reliability of the RCT have not been reported. To examine RCT external responsiveness and intrasession reliability, this study consisted of 2 separate phases. Forty male soldiers belonging to the special units of the National Guard, selected on the basis of their training and specialty operations levels, participated in the first phase of the study to identify the discriminant ability of RCT. This group was then divided into anti-terrorism Commandos (21 soldiers) and Intervention-Brigade (19 soldiers). Only the anti-terrorism Commandos participated in the intrasession reliability study. The Commandos were significantly better than the Intervention-Brigade soldiers on execution time (ET), absolute power output (APO), and relative power output (RPO; p < 0.001). The areas under the receiver operator characteristics curves were all higher than 0.70: 0.91, 0.85, and 0.90 for ET, APO, and RPO, respectively. The RCT provided good external responsiveness; thus, RCT was considered to indicate "good" discriminative ability. No significant difference was found between groups in posttest rating of perceived exertion. The intrasession reliability coefficients were excellent for ET, APO, and RPO (intraclass correlation coefficient [3,1] > 0.90). The standard errors of measurement values for the ET, APO, and RPO were all less than 5% (range: 1.29-1.47%). The main findings of this study suggest that RCT is a tool with both high sensitivity and intrasession reliability, allowing the consistent detection of differences in upper-limb power performance between the 2 military groups of different operational capacity levels.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1519/JSC.0000000000001367DOI Listing
October 2016

Five-meter rope-climbing: a commando-specific power test of the upper limbs.

Int J Sports Physiol Perform 2015 May 13;10(4):509-15. Epub 2014 Nov 13.

Tunisian Research Laboratory "Sport Performance Optimisation", National Center of Medicine and Science in Sports (CNMSS), Tunis, Tunisia.

Purpose: To examine the concurrent validity and absolute and relative reliabilities of a commando-specific power test.

Participants: 21 antiterrorism commandos.

Methods: All participants were assessed on a 5-m rope-climbing test (RCT) and the following tests: pull-ups, push-ups, estimated-1-repetition-maximum (est-1RM), medicine-ball put, and handgrip-strength test. The stopwatch method related to the execution time (ET) was validated by comparison with video motion analysis. The best individual attempt of 3 trials was kept for analysis, and the performance was expressed in absolute power output (APO) and body-mass relative power output (RPO).

Results: Stopwatch assessment had an excellent criterion validity (r=.99, P<.001), intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC3,1) of .98, standard errors of measurement (SEM%) of 1.19%, bias±the 95% limits of agreement of 0.03±0.26 s, and minimal detectable change (MDC95) of 0.51 s. The ET, APO, and RPO were significantly correlated (P<.05) with all cited tests (absolute-value r range .55-.98), while est-1RM was not significantly correlated with the other tests. Test-retest reliability coefficients were excellent for ET, APO, and RPO (ICC3,1>.90). The SEM% values for the ET, APO, and RPO were all under 5% (range 3.73-4.52%), all being smaller than the corresponding smallest worthwhile change. The coefficients of variation for the ET, APO, and RPO were all under 10%. %MDC95 ranged from 10.37% to 12.53%.

Conclusions: Considering the strong concurrent validity and excellent test-retest reliability, the RCT is simple to administer, has ecological validity, and is a valid specific field test of upper-body power for commandos and, in addition, can be accurately assessed with a stopwatch.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1123/ijspp.2014-0334DOI Listing
May 2015
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