Publications by authors named "Wing-Yee Kwok"

17 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Acquired haemophilia A in a patient with limited cutaneous systemic sclerosis.

Rheumatology (Oxford) 2021 Oct;60(10):e360-e361

Department of Hematology, Haga Hospital, The Hague, The Netherlands.

View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/rheumatology/keab351DOI Listing
October 2021

Sex differences in response to allopurinol and benzbromarone in gout: a retrospective cohort study.

Rheumatol Adv Pract 2021 28;5(1):rkab002. Epub 2021 Jan 28.

Department of Rheumatology, Sint Maartenskliniek.

Objective: Owing to lower mean uric acid excretion in women compared with men, uricosuric agents might be preferred in women over xanthine oxidase (XO) inhibitors. We therefore investigated the differences in response to two urate-lowering therapies (ULTs) with different modes of action within and between sexes.

Methods: This retrospective cohort study included patients with a clinical diagnosis of gout who started allopurinol and/or benzbromarone. The successful response to ULT, defined as reaching a serum uric acid (sUA) target of <0.36 mmol/l within 6 months after commencing ULT, was compared between allopurinol and benzbromarone in women and men. Effect modification by sex on differences in response was evaluated.

Results: Allopurinol was started in 255 women and 1045 men, and benzbromarone in 60 women and 205 men. After 6 months, the proportions of women reaching the sUA target were 58.4% and 66.7% for allopurinol and benzbromarone, respectively (difference, -8%; 95% CI: -22%, 5%). The respective proportions in men were 61.0% and 75.6%, respectively (difference, -15%; 95% CI: -21%, -8%). Corrected for confounding, the odds ratio (OR) of reaching the target on benzbromarone allopurinol within women was 0.91 (95% CI: 0.47, 1.75), and within men 1.55 (95% CI: 1.04, 2.32). Corrected for confounding, sex was not an effect modifier of the difference in allopurinol and benzbromarone response (OR, 0.59; 95% CI: 0.28, 1.24).

Conclusion: This study did not demonstrate between-sex differences regarding the response to either a uricosuric agent or an XO inhibitor, negating different treatment choices by sex.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/rap/rkab002DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7878845PMC
January 2021

Etanercept in patients with inflammatory hand osteoarthritis (EHOA): a multicentre, randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial.

Ann Rheum Dis 2018 12 3;77(12):1757-1764. Epub 2018 Oct 3.

Department of Rheumatology, Ghent University Hospital, Ghent, Belgium.

Objective: Hand osteoarthritis is a prevalent disease with limited treatment options. Since joint inflammation is often present, we investigated tumour necrosis factor (TNF) as treatment target in patients with proven joint inflammation in a proof-of-concept study.

Methods: This 1-year, double-blind, randomised, multicentre trial (NTR1192) enrolled patients with symptomatic erosive inflammatory hand osteoarthritis. Patients flaring after non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug washout were randomised to etanercept (24 weeks 50 mg/week, thereafter 25  mg/week) or placebo. The primary outcome was Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) pain at 24 weeks. Secondary outcomes included clinical and imaging outcomes (radiographs scored using Ghent University Scoring System (GUSS, n=54) and MRIs (n=20)).

Results: Of 90 patients randomised to etanercept (n=45) or placebo (n=45), respectively, 12 and 10 discontinued prematurely. More patients on placebo discontinued due to inefficacy (6 vs 3), but fewer due to adverse effects (1 vs 6). The mean between-group difference (MD) in VAS pain was not statistically significantly different (-5.7 (95% CI -15.9 to 4.5), p=0.27 at 24 weeks; - 8.5 (95% CI -18.6 to 1.6), p=0.10 at 1  year; favouring etanercept). In prespecified per-protocol analyses of completers with pain and inflammation at baseline (n=61), MD was -11.8 (95% CI -23.0 to -0.5) (p=0.04) at 1  year. Etanercept-treated joints showed more radiographic remodelling (delta GUSS: MD 2.9 (95% CI 0.5 to 5.4), p=0.02) and less MRI bone marrow lesions (MD -0.22 (95% CI -0.35 to -0.09), p = 0.001); this was more pronounced in joints with baseline inflammation.

Conclusion: Anti-TNF did not relieve pain effectively after 24 weeks in erosive osteoarthritis. Small subgroup analyses showed a signal for effects on subchondral bone in actively inflamed joints, but future studies to confirm this are warranted.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/annrheumdis-2018-213202DOI Listing
December 2018

Malignant Transformation of Hepatocellular Adenoma.

Oncology 2017 17;92 Suppl 1:16-28. Epub 2016 Dec 17.

Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Kindai University Faculty of Medicine, Osaka-Sayama, Japan.

The patient was a 20-year-old male in whom a hepatic hypervascular mass accompanied by intratumoral hemorrhage was detected on examination for epigastric pain. Based on the enlargement of the mass and diagnostic imaging, hepatocellular adenoma (HCA) was suspected and hepatectomy was performed. The lesion was diagnosed as malignant transformation of β-catenin-activated HCA. There are only few reports of cases with malignant transformation of HCA in Japan; it is necessary to accumulate cases to investigate it.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000451012DOI Listing
February 2017

Brief Report: Association of Inflammation With Development of Erosions in Patients With Hand Osteoarthritis: A Prospective Ultrasonography Study.

Arthritis Rheumatol 2016 Feb;68(2):392-7

Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden, The Netherlands.

Objective: To investigate the association between features of ultrasound-detected inflammation and development of erosive disease in patients with hand osteoarthritis (OA) over 2.3 years of followup.

Methods: The study group comprised 56 consecutive patients with hand OA (mean age 61 years, 86% female) fulfilling the American College of Rheumatology criteria. Effusion, synovial thickening, and power Doppler signal in all interphalangeal (IP) joints were assessed with ultrasonography, using standardized methods, at baseline and followup. Radiographs were scored at both time points for osteophytes/joint space narrowing using the Osteoarthritis Research Society International method and for erosive disease (E phase [erosive] and R phase [remodeling]) using the method described by Verbruggen and Veys. Erosion development was defined as progression from N phase (normal) to E phase or R phase. Joints that were in E phase or R phase at baseline were excluded. Associations were analyzed using generalized estimating equations with adjustment for age, sex, body mass index, and baseline structural abnormalities.

Results: At baseline, 51 IP joints (in 18 patients) and at followup 89 IP joints (in 26 patients) had erosions; thus, erosions developed in 38 IP joints. Moderate/severe synovial thickening and a power Doppler signal at baseline were associated with erosion development (adjusted odds ratio [OR] 8.8, 95% confidence interval [95% CI] 2.4-32.3 and OR 7.1, 95% CI 1.9-26.9, respectively). Persistent inflammation was particularly associated with the development of erosions.

Conclusion: Ultrasound-detected features of inflammation are associated with the development of erosions in patients with hand OA, suggesting that inflammation plays a role in the pathogenesis of hand OA and could be a therapeutic target.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/art.39438DOI Listing
February 2016

Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Hand Osteoarthritis: Intraobserver Reliability and Criterion Validity for Clinical and Structural Characteristics.

J Rheumatol 2015 Jul 15;42(7):1224-30. Epub 2015 May 15.

From the Department of Rheumatology, Department of Radiology, and Department of Medical Statistics, Leiden University Medical Centre, Leiden, the Netherlands; Department of Rheumatology Diakonhjemmet Hospital, Oslo, Norway.M.C. Kortekaas, MD; W.Y. Kwok, MD, PhD, Department of Rheumatology, Leiden University Medical Centre; M. Reijnierse, MD, PhD, Department of Radiology, Leiden University Medical Center; R. Wolterbeek, PhD, Department of Medical Statistics, Leiden University Medical Center; P. Bøyesen, MD, PhD, Department of Rheumatology, Diakonhjemmet Hospital; D. van der Heijde, MD, PhD, Department of Rheumatology, Leiden University Medical Centre, and Department of Rheumatology, Diakonhjemmet Hospital; J.L. Bloem, MD, PhD, Department of Radiology, Leiden University Medical Center; M. Kloppenburg, MD, PhD, Department of Rheumatology, Leiden University Medical Centre.

Objective: To investigate criterion validity and intraobserver reliability of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in hand osteoarthritis (HOA).

Methods: In 16 patients with HOA (median age 57 yrs, 62% women, 13 with erosive OA), 3 Tesla MRI scans with gadolinium-chelate administration of right second to fifth distal interphalangeal/proximal interphalangeal joints were scored according to the Oslo HOA scoring method for synovial thickening, bone marrow lesions (BML), osteophytes, joint space narrowing (JSN), and erosions (grade 0-3). Ultrasound (US) was scored for synovial thickening and osteophytes, radiographs for osteophytes and JSN (Osteoarthritis Research Society International score), and anatomical phases (Verbruggen-Veys score). Pain was assessed during physical examination. Correlations of MRI with US and radiographic features were assessed with generalizability theory. With generalized estimating equations analyses, MRI features were associated with pain, adjusting for confounding.

Results: Forty-three percent, 27%, 77%, and 61% of joints had synovial thickening (moderate/severe), BML, osteophytes, and erosions on MRI, respectively. Intraobserver reliability, assessed in 6 patients, was good (ICC 0.77-1.00). Correlations between osteophytes, JSN, and erosions on radiographs and MRI were moderate, substantial, and fair (ICC 0.53, 0.68, and 0.32, respectively); MRI showed more lesions than radiography. Correlation between synovial thickening and osteophytes on MRI and US was moderate (ICC 0.43 and 0.49, respectively). MRI was more sensitive for synovial thickening, US for osteophytes. Pain was associated with moderate/severe synovial thickening (adjusted OR 2.4, 95% CI 1.06-5.5), collateral ligaments (4.2, 2.2-8.3), BML (3.5, 1.6-7.7), erosions (4.5, 1.7-12.2), and osteophytes (2.4, 1.1-5.2).

Conclusion: MRI is a reliable and valid method to assess inflammatory and structural features in HOA. It gives additional information over radiographs and US.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3899/jrheum.140338DOI Listing
July 2015

Inflammatory ultrasound features show independent associations with progression of structural damage after over 2 years of follow-up in patients with hand osteoarthritis.

Ann Rheum Dis 2015 Sep 29;74(9):1720-4. Epub 2014 Apr 29.

Department of Rheumatology, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden, The Netherlands Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden, The Netherlands.

Objective: To study the development of inflammatory features and it's relation to structural damage over a 2.3-year period in patients with hand osteoarthritis (HOA).

Methods: Synovial thickening, effusion and power Doppler signal (PDS) in distal interphalangeal (DIP), proximal interphalangeal (PIP), 1st carpometacarpal (CMC) metacarpal phalangeal (MCP) and 1st interphalangeal (IP) joints were assessed using ultrasonography in 56 consecutive HOA patients (mean age 61.2 years, 85.7% female) fulfilling American College of Rheumatology (ACR) classification criteria, at baseline and follow-up. Radiographic progression of osteophytes and joint space narrowing (JSN) was scored using the OARSI atlas. With generalised estimating equations (GEE), OR with 95% CIs were calculated for the associations between inflammatory ultrasound features and radiographic progression taking in account patient effect, age, gender, Body Mass Index, baseline osteophytes and JSN scores, and other inflammatory ultrasound features.

Results: Of 1680 joints, 8.4%, 8.7%, and 19.8% had synovial thickening, PDS or effusion at baseline, respectively. 7.1% and 5.7% of joints had progression of osteophytes and JSN, respectively. Independent associations were found between synovial thickening, effusion and PDS (grade 2-3 vs 0), and progression of osteophytes (OR (95% CI): 2.6 (1.02 to 6.5), 3.5 (1.7 to 7.4) and 5.7 (1.5 to 21.1)) and of JSN (OR (95% CI): 3.4 (1.3 to 8.4), 3.3 (1.5 to 7.6) and 3.1 (1.01 to 9.2)). Persistent inflammatory features at baseline and follow-up showed stronger associations with radiographic progression than fluctuating inflammatory features in comparison with no inflammatory features.

Conclusions: Inflammatory features, especially when persistently present, are independently associated with radiological progression in HOA after 2.3 years, indicating a role of inflammation in the aetiology of structural damage in HOA.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/annrheumdis-2013-205003DOI Listing
September 2015

Erosive osteoarthritis: a more severe form of radiographic hand osteoarthritis rather than a distinct entity?

Ann Rheum Dis 2015 Jan 4;74(1):136-41. Epub 2013 Oct 4.

Arthritis Research UK Primary Care Centre, Primary Care Sciences, Keele University, Staffordshire, UK.

Objectives: To determine whether erosive osteoarthritis shares the same pattern of joint involvement and risk profile as increasing grades of non-erosive hand osteoarthritis.

Methods: Participants were from two population-based cohorts, aged ≥50 years, reporting hand symptoms in the previous month. Interphalangeal joints were assessed for erosive osteoarthritis (Verbruggen-Veys erosive or remodelled phase) and radiographic osteoarthritis (sliding cut-offs of K&L≥2, K&L≥3 and K&L=4). At the joint level, similarities in the frequency and pattern of erosive and non-erosive osteoarthritis were assessed by Spearman's rank correlation coefficients and generalised estimating equations. At the person level, individuals with erosive osteoarthritis were compared to those with non-erosive osteoarthritis using logistic regression, adjusted for age and gender (aOR), for the following exposures: family history, previous injury, overuse and metabolic factors (BMI, dyslipidaemia, hypertension, diabetes).

Results: In 1076 symptomatic participants the ranked frequency of involvement for erosive joints was comparable to joints with K&L≥3 and K&L=4 (r>0.95). Patterns of joint involvement in erosive osteoarthritis were strongest for symmetry (aOR=6.5; 95% CI 3.0 to 14.1), followed by row (2.0; 0.8 to 5.0) and ray (0.3; 0.0 to 2.5), which was similar to joints with K&L≥3 and K&L=4. Individuals with erosive osteoarthritis (n=80) had an increased risk of metabolic syndrome (2.7; 1.0 to 7.1), notably dyslipidaemia (4.7; 2.1 to 10.6) compared with non-erosive osteoarthritis classed K&L≥3 (n=193).

Conclusions: The similar frequency of radiographic joint involvement and patterning in erosive osteoarthritis and more severe non-erosive osteoarthritis is consistent with prevalent erosive osteoarthritis being a severe form of hand osteoarthritis rather than a distinct entity. Metabolic exposures, dyslipidaemia in particular, may be implicated in erosive osteoarthritis.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/annrheumdis-2013-203948DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4283656PMC
January 2015

Comparison of clinical burden between patients with erosive hand osteoarthritis and inflammatory arthritis in symptomatic community-dwelling adults: the Keele clinical assessment studies.

Rheumatology (Oxford) 2013 Dec 17;52(12):2260-7. Epub 2013 Sep 17.

Department of Rheumatology, C1-R, Leiden University Medical Center, Albinusdreef 2, PO Box 9600, 2300 RC, Leiden, The Netherlands.

Objective: To investigate in the general population the clinical impact of erosive OA in interphalangeal joints (IPJs) compared with symptomatic radiographic hand OA and inflammatory arthritis.

Methods: Standardized assessments with hand radiographs were performed in participants of two population-based cohorts in North Staffordshire with hand symptoms lasting ≥1 day in the past month. Erosive OA was defined as the presence of an eroded or remodelled phase in ≥1 IPJ using the Verbruggen-Veys method. Radiographic hand OA was defined as the presence of ≥1 IPJ/first carpometacarpal joint with a Kellgren-Lawrence score of ≥2. Diagnoses of inflammatory arthritis were based on medical records. Hand pain and disability were assessed with the Australian/Canadian Hand Osteoarthritis Index (AUSCAN). Linear regression analyses were used to compare clinical determinants between groups and calculate mean differences with 95% CIs, adjusted for age and sex.

Results: Of 1076 participants with hand symptoms [60% women, mean age 64.8 years (s.d. 8.3 years)]; 80 persons (7.4%) had erosive OA. The population prevalence of erosive OA in ≥1 IPJ was 2.4% (95% CI 1.8, 3.0). Persons with erosive OA reported more pain and disability than persons with symptomatic radiographic hand OA [adjusted mean difference 1.3 (95% CI 0.3, 2.3) and 2.3 (95% CI 0.4, 4.2), respectively]. Individuals with inflammatory arthritis (n = 44) reported more pain and disability than those with erosive OA [adjusted mean difference 1.7 (95% CI 0.05, 3.4) and 6.3 (95% CI 2.8, 9.9), respectively].

Conclusion: While erosive OA has a greater impact than symptomatic radiographic hand OA in the general population, it is not as severe in terms of hand pain and disability as inflammatory RA.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/rheumatology/ket267DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3828511PMC
December 2013

Metabolic health in families enriched for longevity is associated with low prevalence of hand osteoarthritis and influences OA biomarker profiles.

Ann Rheum Dis 2013 Oct 27;72(10):1669-74. Epub 2012 Oct 27.

Department of Molecular Epidemiology, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden, The Netherlands.

Objectives: Individual metabolic characteristics and age-related changes may affect osteoarthritis (OA) risk as well as levels of potential OA biomarkers such as serum cartilage oligomeric protein (sCOMP) and urinary cross-linked C-telopeptide of type 2 collagen (uCTX2). We investigated hand OA and these putative OA biomarker characteristics at different ages in individuals with a propensity for healthy ageing, in controls, and in patients with OA.

Methods: We investigated hand radiological OA (ROA) and levels of sCOMP and uCTX2 in the Leiden Longevity Study, which consisted of the middle-aged offspring of long-lived sibling pairs as metabolically healthy agers and their partners as controls, and for ROA we compared patients with OA at multiple joint sites from the Genetics, osteoARthritis and Progression Study with the healthy agers and controls.

Results: Hand ROA mean scores were lower in the healthy agers than in controls. Lower hand ROA scores at higher ages were observed in healthy agers with low glucose levels. Furthermore, in healthy agers, a higher mean sCOMP level was observed than in controls. All study groups had higher sCOMP levels at higher chronological age. Likewise, uCTX2 levels were higher at higher chronological age in the controls and patients with OA, which was not observed in the healthy agers.

Conclusions: Metabolic health in middle age is associated with less ROA and influences putative OA marker profiles, independently of chronological age. When used as OA biomarkers, it is relevant that independently of hand ROA status, uCTX2 is influenced by healthy metabolism and sCOMP is higher at higher chronological age.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/annrheumdis-2012-202013DOI Listing
October 2013

In erosive hand osteoarthritis more inflammatory signs on ultrasound are found than in the rest of hand osteoarthritis.

Ann Rheum Dis 2013 Jun 20;72(6):930-4. Epub 2012 Jul 20.

Department of Rheumatology, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden, The Netherlands.

Objective: To compare inflammation as assessed by ultrasound between patients with the subset erosive hand osteoarthritis (EOA) versus non-EOA.

Methods: Consecutive hand osteoarthritis (HOA) patients (fulfilling ACR criteria) were included. Eighteen interphalangeal joints were scored on radiographs using the Verbruggen-Veys anatomical phase score; E and R phases were defined as erosive. Patients were assigned to EOA when at least one joint was erosive. Effusion, synovial thickening and power Doppler signal (PDS) were scored with ultrasound on a 4-point scale. Generalised estimated equation analyses were used to compare ultrasound features between EOA and HOA, and to associate ultrasound features with.anatomical phases; OR with 95% CI were calculated with adjustments for patient effects and confounders.

Results: Of 55 HOA patients (mean age 61 years, 86% women) 51% had EOA. In 94 erosive joints, synovial thickening, effusion and PDS were found in 13%, 50% and 15%, respectively; in 896 non-erosive joints in 10%, 26% and 8%, respectively. In summated scores of PDS, effusion was higher in EOA than in non-EOA. Effusion and synovial thickening were more frequent in S, J, E and R phases compared to N phase. PDS was only associated with E phase (OR 5.3, 95% CI 1.3 to 20.5) not with other phases. Non-erosive joints in EOA demonstrated more PDS (OR 3.2, 95% CI 1.6 to 6.4) and effusion (OR 2.2, 95% CI 1.2 to 3.8) in comparison to joints in non-EOA.

Conclusions: Inflammatory signs are more frequent in EOA than in non-EOA, not only in erosive joints but also in non-erosive joints, suggesting an underlying systemic cause for erosive evolution.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/annrheumdis-2012-201458DOI Listing
June 2013

Role of rheumatology clinical nurse specialists in optimizing management of hand osteoarthritis during daily practice in secondary care: an observational study.

J Multidiscip Healthc 2011 1;4:403-11. Epub 2011 Nov 1.

Department of Rheumatology, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden, The Netherlands.

Background: The purpose of this study was to describe the effectiveness of a single one-hour consultation by a clinical nurse specialist in patients with hand osteoarthritis during daily rheumatology practice in secondary care.

Methods: Consecutive patients diagnosed by rheumatologists to have primary hand osteoarthritis and referred to the clinical nurse specialist were eligible for entry into this study. The standardized 1-hour consultation consisted of assessments and education on hand osteoarthritis by a clinical nurse specialist. Before and 3 months after the consultation, assessments were done to evaluate treatment (use of assistive devices, acetaminophen), health-related quality of life (physical component summary [PCS] score of Short-Form 36), and hand pain/function (Australian/ Canadian Osteoarthritis Hand Index [AUSCAN]). Paired t-tests and McNemar tests were used to analyze differences between baseline and follow-up. Satisfaction was measured after consultation at follow-up using a multidimensional questionnaire comprising 13 items (rated on a four-point scale).

Results: A total of 439 patients were referred, with follow-up data available for 195 patients, comprising 177 (87%) females, and of mean age 59 ± 9.0 years. After consultation, the proportions of patients using assistive devices and/or acetaminophen increased significantly from 30% to 39% and from 35% to 49%, respectively. PCS improved significantly (P = 0.03) whereas AUSCAN hand pain/function showed no significant differences compared with baseline (P values 0.52 and 0.92, respectively). The proportions of patients reporting to be satisfied or fully satisfied ranged from 78% to 99% per item.

Conclusion: A single, comprehensive, standardized assessment and education by a clinical nurse specialist improved the physical dimension of health-related quality of life in hand osteoarthritis. Most patients were satisfied with the consultation. Further controlled trials are needed to determine the added value of the clinical nurse specialist in care for hand osteoarthritis.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/JMDH.S25269DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3215348PMC
October 2012

Hand osteoarthritis--a heterogeneous disorder.

Nat Rev Rheumatol 2011 Nov 22;8(1):22-31. Epub 2011 Nov 22.

Department of Rheumatology, Leiden University Medical Center, Albinusdreef 2, PO Box 9600, 2300 RC Leiden, The Netherlands.

Hand osteoarthritis (OA) is a prevalent disorder. Hand OA is not one single disease, but a heterogeneous group of disorders. Radiographic signs of hand OA, such as osteophytes or joint space narrowing, can be found in up to 81% of the elderly population. Several hand OA subsets--such as nodal interphalangeal OA, thumb base OA and erosive OA--can be discriminated. Furthermore, the experience of symptoms and the course of the disease differ between patients. Studies that used well-defined study populations with longitudinal follow-up have shown that similarities and differences can be observed in the pathogenesis, epidemiology and risk factors of the various hand OA subsets. Erosive OA in particular, characterized by erosive lesions on radiographical images, has a higher clinical burden and worse outcome than nonerosive hand OA. Imaging modalities (such as ultrasonography) have increased our knowledge of the role of inflammation of the disease. Our understanding of the heterogeneous nature of hand OA can eventually lead to increased knowledge of the pathogenesis of, and ultimately new treatment modalities for, this complex disease.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/nrrheum.2011.170DOI Listing
November 2011

Osteophytes and joint space narrowing are independently associated with pain in finger joints in hand osteoarthritis.

Ann Rheum Dis 2011 Oct 8;70(10):1835-7. Epub 2011 Jul 8.

Department of Rheumatology, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden, The Netherlands.

Objective: To study the associations between structural abnormalities on ultrasound (US) or conventional x-rays (CR) and pain in hand osteoarthritis (HOA).

Methods: In 55 consecutive patients with HOA (mean age 61 years, 86% women) fulfilling the American College of Rheumatology criteria, pain in 30 separate hand joints was assessed upon palpation; osteophytes were assessed by US and CR and joint space narrowing (JSN) by CR. Associations between structural abnormalities and pain per joint were analysed using generalised estimated equations to account for patient effects and adjusted for age, sex, body mass index, US inflammatory features and other remaining structural abnormalities.

Results: In 1649 joints, 69% and 46% had osteophytes on US and CR, respectively and 47% had JSN. Osteophytes and JSN showed independent associations with pain per joint adjusted: OR for osteophytes: 4.8 (95% CI 3.1 to 7.5) for US and 4.1 (95% CI 2.4 to 7.1) for CR; for JSN: 4.2 (95% CI 2.0 to 9.0).

Conclusions: Osteophytes and JSN are independently associated with pain in individual HOA joints, taking into account patient effects.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/ard.2010.147553DOI Listing
October 2011

Pain in hand osteoarthritis is associated with inflammation: the value of ultrasound.

Ann Rheum Dis 2010 Jul 14;69(7):1367-9. Epub 2010 May 14.

Department of Rheumatology, Leiden University Medical Center, PO Box 9600, 2300 RC Leiden, The Netherlands.

Objectives: To investigate the association of ultrasound (US) features-grey scale (GS) synovitis, synovial thickening, effusion and power Doppler signal (PDS)-with symptoms in hand osteoarthritis (HOA).

Methods: Fifty-five consecutive patients (mean age 62 years, 87% women) with HOA, fulfilling the American College of Rheumatology criteria, were assessed for pain upon palpation and filled in Australian/Canadian Osteoarthritis Index (AUSCAN) scores, visual analogue scale pain and Short Form-36 (SF-36). US was performed in all metacarpophalangeal, proximal interphalangeal, distal interphalangeal, first interphalangeal and first carpometacarpal joints, and features were semiquantitatively scored (0-3). Generalised estimating equations were used to calculate OR (95% CI) for the association between US features and pain per joint adjusted for relevant confounders. The association between US features summated scores and self-reported outcomes was studied by linear regression analysis.

Results: GS synovitis, effusion, synovial thickening and PDS were shown in 96%, 91%, 73% and 86% of patients, respectively. US features were dose-dependently associated with pain upon palpation (OR 4.5 (95% CI 2.2 to 9.0), 4.4 (2.0 to 9.4), 4.9 (2.2 to 11.0) and 4.1 (2.2 to 7.9)). GS synovitis was associated with AUSCAN pain, stiffness and SF-36, and effusion with AUSCAN pain.

Conclusions: GS synovitis, effusion, synovial thickening and PDS are associated with pain in HOA, suggesting a role for inflammation. Further follow-up studies are warranted.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/ard.2009.124875DOI Listing
July 2010

Incidence rates and management of urinary tract infections among children in Dutch general practice: results from a nation-wide registration study.

BMC Pediatr 2006 Apr 4;6:10. Epub 2006 Apr 4.

Department of General Practice, Erasmus MC - University Medical Center Rotterdam, PO Box 1738, 3000 DR, Rotterdam The Netherlands.

Background: We aimed to investigate incidence rates of urinary tract infections in Dutch general practice and their association with gender, season and urbanisation level, and to analyse prescription and referral in case of urinary tract infections.

Method: During one calendar year, 195 general practitioners in 104 practices in the Netherlands registered all their patient contacts. This study was performed by the Netherlands Institute for Health Services Research (NIVEL) in 2001. Of 82,053 children aged 0 to 18 years, the following variables were collected: number of episodes per patient, number of contacts per episode, month of the year in which the diagnosis of urinary tract infection was made, age, gender, urbanisation level, drug prescription and referral.

Results: The overall incidence rate was 19 episodes per 1000 person years. The incidence rate in girls was 8 times as high as in boys. The incidence rate in smaller cities and rural areas was 2 times as high as in the three largest cities. Throughout the year, incidence rates varied with a decrease in summertime for children at the age of 0 to 12 years. Of the prescriptions, 66% were in accordance with current guidelines, but only 18% of the children who had an indication were actually referred.

Conclusion: This study shows that incidence rates of urinary tract infections are not only related to gender and season, but also to urbanisation. General practitioners in the Netherlands frequently do not follow the clinical guidelines for urinary tract infections, especially with respect to referral.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1471-2431-6-10DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1450286PMC
April 2006
-->