Mr Williams Walana, Mr - Universitiy for Development Studies  - Mr

Mr Williams Walana

Mr

Universitiy for Development Studies

Mr

Tamale , Northern Region | Ghana

Main Specialties: Medical Microbiology

Additional Specialties: Microbiology and Immunology

Mr Williams Walana, Mr - Universitiy for Development Studies  - Mr

Mr Williams Walana

Mr

Introduction

Primary Affiliation: Universitiy for Development Studies - Tamale , Northern Region , Ghana

Specialties:

Additional Specialties:

Research Interests:

Publications

14Publications

152Reads

73Profile Views

CXCR1/CXCR2 antagonist G31P inhibits nephritis in a mouse model of uric acid nephropathy.

Biomed Pharmacother 2018 Nov 28;107:1142-1150. Epub 2018 Aug 28.

Department of Immunology, Dalian Medical University, Dalian, Liaoning, China. Electronic address:

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.biopha.2018.07.077DOI Listing
November 2018
5 Reads
2.023 Impact Factor

IL-8 analogue CXCL8 (3-72) K11R/G31P, modulates LPS-induced inflammation via AKT1-NF-kβ and ERK1/2-AP-1 pathways in THP-1 monocytes.

Hum Immunol 2018 Nov 17;79(11):809-816. Epub 2018 Aug 17.

Department of Immunology, Dalian Medical University, Dalian, Liaoning, China. Electronic address:

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.humimm.2018.08.007DOI Listing
November 2018
70 Reads
2.138 Impact Factor

Cytotoxic effect of interleukin-8 in retinal ganglion cells and its possible mechanisms.

Int J Ophthalmol 2018 18;11(8):1277-1283. Epub 2018 Aug 18.

Department of Immunology, Dalian Medical University, Dalian 116044, Liaoning Province, China.

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http://www.ijo.cn/gjyken/ch/reader/view_abstract.aspx?file_n
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http://dx.doi.org/10.18240/ijo.2018.08.05DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6090122PMC
August 2018
4 Reads
0.500 Impact Factor

IL-8 antagonist, CXCL8(3-72)K11R/G31P coupled with probiotic exhibit variably enhanced therapeutic potential in ameliorating ulcerative colitis.

Biomed Pharmacother 2018 Jul 24;103:253-261. Epub 2018 Apr 24.

Department of Immunology, Dalian Medical University, Dalian, Liaoning, China. Electronic address:

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.biopha.2018.04.008DOI Listing
July 2018
47 Reads
2.023 Impact Factor

Cisatracurium Retards Cell Migration and Invasion Upon Upregulation of p53 and Inhibits the Aggressiveness of Colorectal Cancer.

Front Physiol 2018 31;9:941. Epub 2018 Jul 31.

Department of Anesthesiology, First Affiliated Hospital of Dalian Medical University, Dalian, China.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fphys.2018.00941DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6079220PMC
July 2018
4 Reads

TL1A mediates fibroblast-like synoviocytes migration and Indian Hedgehog signaling pathway via TNFR2 in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

Eur Cytokine Netw 2018 Mar;29(1):27-35

Department of Immunology, College of Basic Medical Science, Dalian Medical University, Liaoning, China.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1684/ecn.2018.0405DOI Listing
March 2018
4 Reads
1.960 Impact Factor

Parasitic infections and maternal anaemia among expectant mothers in the Dangme East District of Ghana.

BMC Res Notes 2017 Jan 3;10(1). Epub 2017 Jan 3.

Department of Clinical Microbiology, School of Medicine and Health Sciences, University for Development Studies, Tamale, Ghana.

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http://bmcresnotes.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s13104
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13104-016-2327-5DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5217638PMC
January 2017
5 Reads

Sero-prevalence of HIV, HBV and HCV among Blood Donors in the Kintampo Municipal Hospital, Ghana

British Microbiology Research Journal

Aims: This study aimed at establishing the prevalence of some viral Transfusion Transmissible Infectious (TTI) agents among blood donors in the Kintampo North municipality of Ghana. Study Design: A retrospective cross-sectional hospital based study. Place and Duration of Study: The study was conducted at the Laboratory unit of the Kintampo Municipal Hospital between May and August, 2013. Methodology: Archived results (from January 2010 to December 2012) on blood donation from the hospital’s laboratory were reviewed manually. Data comprising age, sex and results on HBsAg, anti-HCV and anti-HIV tests of blood donors were reviewed. The data were analyzed using Microsoft excel 2007 statistical package. Results: A total of 3402 people were screened for blood donation. Out of this number 3139 (92.3%) were males while 263 (7.7%) were females. The combined sero-prevalence of HBsAg, anti-HCV and anti-HIV was 19.5% (643/3139) and 11.4% (30/263) for males and females respectively. Hepatitis B surface antigen year-on-year prevalence was 9.6%. Anti-HCV and anti-HIV recorded year-on-year prevalences of 4.4% and 4.9% respectively. Donors younger than 20 years recorded the highest prevalence of HBsAg [15.9% (34/214)] followed by those in age group ≥20<30 [10.3% (170/1652)]. The highest prevalence rates of 6.1% and 5.0% for anti-HIV and anti-HCV were observed in age groups ≥50 and ≥30<40 years respectively. The commonest co-infection occurrence was HBV-HCV [45.5% (10/22)]. Conclusion: The prevalence of the viral TTI agents studied among blood donors in the Kintampo municipality is relatively high. Co-infection with HBV and HCV was also high. Keywords: Sero-prevalence; HIV; Hepatitis; Kintampo; Ghana.

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August 2014
7 Reads

In vitro Antimicrobial Activity of the Flower Buds of Eugenia caryophyllata

European Journal of Medicinal Plants

Aims: This study investigated the antimicrobial effect of aqueous and ethanol extracts of the flower buds of Eugenia caryophyllata (Myrtaeae) against a wide range of bacteria and yeasts cells isolated clinically from patients. Methodology: The agar diffusion method was used to establish the antimicrobial activity and the zones of inhibition caused by the extracts. The antimicrobial effects of 16% and 32% aqueous and ethanol extracts of Eugenia caryophyllata were investigated against 111 pathogenic bacteria and yeasts cells. The microbes used consisted of 11 Proteus mirabilis, 20 Salmonella typhi, 15 Pseudomonas aeruginosa, 18 Escherichia coli, 19 Staphylococcus aureus, 12 Klebsiella pneumoniae, and 16 Candida albicans species. Results: The ethanol extracts inhibited the growth of all the microbes employed in the study with inhibition zones ranging from 8.00±0.00 mm to 24.00±0.00 mm. The aqueous extracts however exhibited different degrees of antimicrobial activity with zones of inhibition ranging from 6.00±0.00 mm to 13.33±0.29 mm. Conclusion: Our study concludes that the aqueous and ethanol extracts of the flower buds of Eugenia caryophyllata have relatively good antimicrobial activity against a wide range of medically important pathogenic bacteria and Candida albicans in vitro.

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July 2014
5 Reads

Prevalence of hookworm infection: a retrospective study in Kumasi.

Asian Pac J Trop Biomed 2014 May;4(Suppl 1):S158-61

Department of Clinical Microbiology, School of Medical Sciences, Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology, Kumasi, Ghana.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.12980/APJTB.4.2014APJTB-2013-0014DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4025262PMC
May 2014
6 Reads

Sero-Prevalence of Hepatitis B Virus Infection among Blood Donors: A Retrospective Study in the Kintampo Municipal Hospital, Ghana

Walana, W., Hokey, P. and Ahiaba, S. (2014) Sero-Prevalence of Hepatitis B Virus Infection among Blo

Open Journal of Medical Microbiology

Background: Hepatitis B virus is one of the transfusion transmission infectious agents of public health relevance. Its prevalence varies across the globe. Establishing the sero-prevalence of the disease is critical to informing the direction of preventive and control strategies. Objective: The aim of this study therefore was to establish the hepatitis B surface antigen sero-prevalence among blood donors in the Kintampo municipality of Ghana. Methodology: This three-year hospital based retrospective study was conducted at the laboratory unit of the Kintampo Municipal Hospital. The laboratory uses one step immunochromatographic test kits to detect the presence of hepatitis B surface antigen in the sera of blood donors. Records on blood donors were reviewed for hepatitis B sero-positivity. Results: A total of 3402 blood donors were studied, out of which 3238 (95.2%) were males and 164 (4.8%) were females. The overall sero-prevalence of hepatitis B surface antigen was 9.6% (327/3402). Majority of the sero-positive donors were less than 40 years, with higher prevalence of 16.4% (35/214) in donors less than 20 years. The sero-prevalence in males and females was 9.7% (313/3238) and 8.5% (14/164) respectively. Conclusion: The Kintampo municipality has a relatively high prevalence of hepatitis B among blood donors. The probability of hepatitis B viral infection was age inclined as the youth seem to be at greater risk of contracting the disease.Keywords Hepatitis; Blood; Sero-Prevalence

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March 2014
6 Reads

Prevalence of intestinal protozoan infestation among primary school children in Urban and peri-urban communities in Kumasi, Ghana

Science Journal of Public Health

Abstract: Introduction- Intestinal protozoan infections continue to remain a global public health challenge, particularly in developing countries. Children are greatly prone to these infections via the ingestion of food, water or soil contaminated with the infective stage of these parasites. Objectives- This study focused on establishing the prevalence of intestinal protozoan infection among primary school children aged 5 to 12 years from six communities in the Kumasi metropolis of Ghana. Methods- A total of 2400 children were randomly selected sampled. Stool samples collected from the children were analyzed using the formol-ether concentration technique. The modified Ziehl-Neelsen staining technique was employed in the identification of Cryptosporidium parvum. Results- The overall prevalence of intestinal protozoan identified among the studied school children was 42.9%. Prevalence was significantly higher in males than females with rates of 51.0% (604/1162) and 30.8% (381/1238) respectively. The highest protozoan infestation was Giardia lamblia with a prevalence of 16.8% (195/1162) and 7.8 % (97/1238) in males and females respectively. Three pathogenic strains (Giardia lamblia, Entamoeba histolytica/dispar and Cryptosporidium parvum) and four non-pathogenic species (Entamoeba coli, Endolimax nana, Chilomastix mesnili and Iodamoeba butschlii) were identified in the study. Giardia lamblia and Cryptosporidium parvum recorded prevalence rates of 12.2% and 8.5% respectively. Prevalence was however proportional to age with respect to Endolimax nana and Iodamoeba butschlii infections. Conclusion- There is relatively high prevalence of intestinal protozoan infection among the studied children. This obviously suggests that there are possible household, school based and behaviour oriented risk factors which predispose the children to these parasites. Keywords: Intestinal Protozoan, Parasites, Pathogenic

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January 2014
7 Reads

Malaria and Anaemia in Pregnant and Non-Pregnant Women of Child-Bearing Age at the University Hospital, Kumasi, Ghana*

Open Journal of Medical Microbiology

Background: Malaria infection during pregnancy is a major public health problem in tropical and subtropical regions globally. Anaemia is often an adverse outcome of severe parasitic infections during pregnancy in developing countries. Pregnant women in malaria-endemic communities are more susceptible to Plasmodium falciparum infections than non-pregnant women of child-bearing age. Objective: To comparatively investigate malaria and anaemia in pregnant and non-pregnant women of child-bearing age. Design: A cross-sectional comparative study. Three hundred and eighty pregnant women and 380 non-pregnant women were screened for the study. Setting: The study was conducted at the University Hospital, Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology, Kumasi, Ghana. Measurements: Par- ticipants’ demographic data were collected via the administration of questionnaires. In addition their blood samples were analyzed for haemoglobin level and malaria parasites, while stool samples from the pregnant women were exam- ined for intestinal parasites. Results: The study revealed that pregnant women have higher malaria parasitaemia (12.6%) and anaemia (62.6%). The species of Plasmodium isolated from the pregnant women were P. falciparum (85.4%), P. malariae (4.2%) and P. ovale (10.4%). Malaria parasitaemia was higher in the primigravidae (14%). However multi- gravidae recorded the highest anaemia prevalence (67.1%). Age of pregnant women was a factor affecting malaria parasitaemia with a significant P-value and OR (P value = 0.0041, 0R = 7.61). Conclusions: Pregnant women were more susceptible to malaria and anaemia than non-pregnant women of child-bearing age. Most of the pregnant women reported at antenatal clinic during the second trimester. Primigravidae however recorded the highest malaria parasitae- mia. The main species of Plasmodium observed in the blood samples was falciparum. Keywords: Malaria; Anaemia; Pregnant Women; Non-Pregnant Women

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September 2013
6 Reads

In vitro antimicrobial activity of ethanolic fractions of Cryptolepis sanguinolenta.

Ann Clin Microbiol Antimicrob 2012 Jun 18;11:16. Epub 2012 Jun 18.

Department of Microbiology, Centre for Scientific Research into Plant Medicine, Mampong-Akwapim, Ghana.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1476-0711-11-16DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3473295PMC
June 2012
7 Reads
1.514 Impact Factor

Top co-authors

Bing Wang
Bing Wang

The Second Xiangya Hospital of Central South University

4
Fang Li
Fang Li

Peking Union Medical College Hospital

4
John R Gordon
John R Gordon

University of Saskatchewan

4
Jing Wei
Jing Wei

Tianjin Key Laboratory for Modern Drug Delivery & High-Efficiency

3
Jya-Wei Cheng
Jya-Wei Cheng

National Tsing Hua University

3
Ying Ye
Ying Ye

the First Affiliated Hospital of Anhui Medical University

2
Abdalkhalig Elkhider
Abdalkhalig Elkhider

Dalian Medical University

2
Mahmoud Al-Azab
Mahmoud Al-Azab

Dalian Medical University

2
Walana Williams
Walana Williams

Dalian Medical University

2