Publications by authors named "William W Dexter"

23 Publications

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Curr Sports Med Rep 2021 Sep;20(9):435

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1249/JSR.0000000000000872DOI Listing
September 2021

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Curr Sports Med Rep 2021 Jul;20(7):337

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1249/JSR.0000000000000857DOI Listing
July 2021

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Curr Sports Med Rep 2020 Nov;19(11):448

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1249/JSR.0000000000000766DOI Listing
November 2020

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Curr Sports Med Rep 2021 Jan;20(1)

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1249/JSR.0000000000000792DOI Listing
January 2021

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Curr Sports Med Rep 2021 Mar;20(3):132

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1249/JSR.0000000000000816DOI Listing
March 2021

Unverifiable Academic Work by Applicants to Primary Care Sports Medicine Fellowship Programs in the United States.

J Grad Med Educ 2016 Dec;8(5):767-770

Background : In 2008, it was shown that 11% of applications to a primary care sports medicine program contained unverifiable citations for publications. In 2009, the American Medical Society for Sports Medicine changed the application requirements, requiring proof that all claimed citations (publications and presentations) be included with the fellowship application.

Objective : We determined the rate of unverifiable academic citations in applications to primary care sports medicine fellowship programs after proof of citations was required.

Methods : We retrospectively examined all applications submitted to 5 primary care sports medicine fellowship programs across the country for 3 academic years (2010-2013), out of 108 to 131 programs per year. For claimed citations that did not include proof of publication or presentation, we attempted to verify them using PubMed and Google Scholar searches, a medical librarian search, and finally directly contacting the publisher or sponsoring conference organization for verification.

Results : Fifteen of 311 applications contained at least 1 unverifiable citation. The total unverifiable rate was 4.8% (15 of 311) for publications and 11% (9 of 85) for presentations. These rates were lower than previously published within the same medical subspecialty.

Conclusions : After requiring proof of publication and presentation citations within applications to primary care sports medicine fellowship programs, unverifiable citations persisted but were less than previously reported.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.4300/JGME-D-16-00059.1DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5180535PMC
December 2016

General Medical Considerations for the Wilderness Adventurer: Medical Conditions That May Worsen With or Present Challenges to Coping With Wilderness Exposure.

Wilderness Environ Med 2015 Dec;26(4 Suppl):S20-9

Department of Family Medicine, Georgia Regents University, Augusta, Georgia (Dr Asplund).

Participation in wilderness and adventure sports is on the rise, and as such, practitioners will see more athletes seeking clearance to participate in these events. The purpose of this article is to describe specific medical conditions that may worsen or present challenges to the athlete in a wilderness environment.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.wem.2015.09.007DOI Listing
December 2015

Tolerability and Efficacy of 3 Approaches to Intra-articular Corticosteroid Injections of the Knee for Osteoarthritis: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

Orthop J Sports Med 2015 Aug 25;3(8):2325967115600687. Epub 2015 Aug 25.

Center for Outcomes Research and Evaluation, Maine Medical Center, Portland, Maine, USA.

Background: Several studies have been performed suggesting that a superolateral approach to cortisone injections for symptomatic osteoarthritis of the knee is more accurate than anteromedial or anterolateral approaches, but there are little data to correlate clinical outcomes with these results. Additionally, there are minimal data to evaluate the pain of such procedures, and this consideration may impact physician preferences for a preferred approach to knee injection.

Purpose: To determine the comparative efficacy and tolerability (patient comfort) of landmark-guided cortisone injections at 3 commonly used portals into the arthritic knee without effusion.

Study Design: Randomized controlled trial; Level of evidence, 1.

Methods: Adult, English-speaking patients presenting to a sports medicine clinic with knee pain attributed to radiographically proven grades I through III knee osteoarthritis were randomized to receive a cortisone injection via superolateral, anteromedial, or anterolateral approaches. Patients used a visual analog scale (VAS) to self-report comfort with the procedure. Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Arthritis Index (WOMAC) 3.1 VAS scores were used to establish baseline pain and dysfunction prior to the injection and at 1 and 4 weeks follow-up via mail.

Results: A total of 55 knees from 53 patients were randomized for injection using a superolateral approach (17 knees), an anteromedial approach (20 knees), and an anterolateral approach (18 knees). The mean VAS scores for procedural discomfort showed no significant differences between groups (superolateral, 39.1 ± 28.5; anteromedial, 32.9 ± 31.5; anterolateral, 33.1 ± 26.6; P = .78). WOMAC scores at baseline were similar between groups as well (superolateral, 1051 ± 686; anteromedial, 1450 ± 573; anterolateral, 1378 ± 673; P = .18). The WOMAC scores decreased at 1 and 4 weeks for all groups, with no significant differences in reduction between the 3 groups.

Conclusion: Other studies have shown that the superolateral portal is the most accurate. This study did not assess accuracy, but it showed that all 3 knee injection sites studied have similar overall clinical benefit at 4-week follow-up. Procedural pain was not significantly different between groups.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/2325967115600687DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4622310PMC
August 2015

General Medical Considerations for the Wilderness Adventurer: Medical Conditions That May Worsen With or Present Challenges to Coping With Wilderness Exposure.

Clin J Sport Med 2015 Sep;25(5):396-403

*Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, Colorado; †Department of Family Medicine and Community Health, University of Minnesota, St. Paul, Minnesota; ‡Department of Emergency Medicine, Institute for Altitude Medicine, Telluride, Colorado; §Department of Family Medicine, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts; ¶Department of Sports Medicine, The Vancouver Clinic, Vancouver, Washington; ‖Department of Orthopedics/Community & Family Medicine, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin; **Department of Family Medicine, Group Health Cooperative, Everett, Washington; ††Department of Emergency Medicine, University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, North Carolina; ‡‡Departments of Medicine, Pediatrics and Pathology, Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, Oregon; §§Department of Ophthalmology, John A. Moran Eye Center, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah; ¶¶Department of Emergency Medicine, Denver Health Medical Center, Denver, Colorado; and ‖‖Department of Family Medicine, Georgia Regents University, Augusta, Georgia.

Participation in wilderness and adventure sports is on the rise, and as such, practitioners will see more athletes seeking clearance to participate in these events. The purpose of this article is to describe specific medical conditions that may worsen or present challenges to the athlete in a wilderness environment.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/JSM.0000000000000229DOI Listing
September 2015

Sports-related concussion: Truth be told.

Neurol Clin Pract 2013 Aug;3(4):277-278

National Collegiate Athletic Association (BH); American College of Sports Medicine (WWD), Indianapolis, IN; and American Medical Society for Sports Medicine (JD), Leawood, KS.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1212/CPJ.0b013e3182a1ba46DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5765957PMC
August 2013

Osteoarthritis--a silent problem that needs our attention!

Curr Sports Med Rep 2013 May-Jun;12(3):138-9

The Ohio Sports Medicine Center, Columbus, OH, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1249/JSR.0b013e318293e3deDOI Listing
January 2014

Injury trends and prevention in rugby union football.

Curr Sports Med Rep 2010 May-Jun;9(3):139-43

Maine Medical Center Sports Medicine Program, Portland, ME 04101, USA.

Rugby union football has long been one of the most popular sports in the world. Its popularity and number of participants continue to increase in the United States. Until 1995, rugby union primarily was an amateur sport. Worldwide there are now flourishing professional leagues in many countries, and after a long absence, rugby union will be returning to the Olympic games in 2016. In the United States, rugby participation continues to increase, particularly at the collegiate and high school levels. With the increase in rugby professional athletes and the reported increase in aggressive play, there have been changes to the injury patterns in the sport. There is still significant need for further epidemiologic data as there is evidence that injury prevention programs and rule changes have been successful in decreasing the number of catastrophic injuries in rugby union.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1249/JSR.0b013e3181df124cDOI Listing
August 2010

Misrepresentation of research citations by applicants to a primary care sports medicine fellowship program in the United States.

Clin J Sport Med 2008 May;18(3):279-81

Maine Medical Center, Portland, ME 04101, USA.

Objective: To determine the prevalence of misrepresentation of publications and national presentations claimed in applications to the Maine Medical Center (MMC) Primary Care Sports Medicine Fellowship Program from 2001 through 2004.

Design: A retrospective chart review study.

Setting: The Maine Medical Center Primary Care Sports Medicine Fellowship Program.

Methods: Presentations were confirmed in the program of the cited meeting or by contacting the sponsoring organization. Publications were verified by performing a MEDLINE search or by cross-referencing in Ulrich's International Periodicals Directory. If the title was listed, the citation was verified by contacting the publisher.

Results: Fifty applicants reported research publications. Of those, 14 applications had publications that could not be verified. The overall misrepresentation rate was 11.3%; among applicants claiming publications it was 28%. There was no difference in misrepresentation rate between specialties. Eighteen applicants reported giving national presentations, and nine presentations could not be verified, corresponding to an overall misrepresentation rate of 5.6%. Of applicants claiming presentations, 38.9% had at least one misrepresentation.

Conclusion: Applicants to the Maine Medical Center Sports Medicine Fellowship Program were found to have high rates of misrepresentation in their citations of both publications and presentations.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/JSM.0b013e31816a1c65DOI Listing
May 2008

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Curr Sports Med Rep 2008 Mar-Apr;7(2):64-5

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/01.csmr.0000313389.56698.b1DOI Listing
December 2012

Cutaneous fungal and viral infections in athletes.

Clin Sports Med 2007 Jul;26(3):397-411

McKay-Dee Sports Medicine, Ogden, UT 84403, USA.

Fungal and viral cutaneous infections are common among athletes and can develop quickly into widespread outbreaks. To prevent such outbreaks, the team physician must be familiar with common cutaneous infections including tinea corporis, tinea capitis, tinea pedis, herpes simplex, molluscum contagiosum, and human papillomaviruses. Appropriate treatment and management of these infections allows the athlete to safely return to play and safeguards teammates and opponents against the spread of these diseases.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.csm.2007.04.004DOI Listing
July 2007

Bacterial dermatoses in sports.

Clin Sports Med 2007 Jul;26(3):383-96

Sports Medicine Program, Maine Medical Center, Portland, ME 04101, USA.

Bacterial skin dermatoses are common in athletes, and it is the role of team physicians to be able to recognize and treat such problems. Despite the skin's role as an efficient barrier, a moist environment coupled with frequent skin trauma and contact by athletes with equipment and other players predispose to acquiring infections. In the past 10 years, there has been a dramatic rise in methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infections. This article discusses community-acquired MRSA infections among athletes and focuses on the recognition of, management of, and return-to-play guidelines for common bacterial skin infections in athletes. Some of the more unusual bacterial infections that may present in this population are also reviewed.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.csm.2007.04.008DOI Listing
July 2007

Inguinal hernias: value of preparticipation examination, activity restriction decisions, and timing of surgery.

Curr Sports Med Rep 2006 Apr;5(2):89-92

Maine Medical Center, Portland, ME 04101, USA.

Though groin pain is common, the differential diagnosis is broad, and narrowing down the diagnosis of an inguinal hernia can be challenging. Once a hernia is diagnosed, play becomes limited based on severity of symptoms and physician and patient comfort, and the athlete should be closely monitored for worsening symptoms. Several surgical approaches are available for the repair of inguinal hernias, but without knowing the true natural history of this disorder, it is difficult to know when it is appropriate to have a hernia repaired.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11932-006-0036-xDOI Listing
April 2006

Acne and active patients: improving more than superficial appearances.

Phys Sportsmed 2005 Sep;33(9):14-26

Intermountain Health Care, Layton, UT, 84014, USA.

Acne vulgaris is a common skin condition that affects many athletes. Accurate diagnosis of the type and severity of acne lesions will help direct appropriate therapeutic interventions. Medications, including topical retinoids, topical antibiotics, oral antibiotics, and oral retinoids, are effective in treating acne. Side effects of acne therapy are common and generally mild, but athletes may require special counseling to minimize adverse effects of acne therapy. Treating acne may be challenging for both patient and physician, but with patience and perseverance, an appropriate treatment plan can provide dramatic improvements in the skin, emotional well-being, and social and athletic functioning.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3810/psm.2005.09.192DOI Listing
September 2005

Cold, Wind, and Sun Exposure: Managing-and Preventing-Skin Damage.

Phys Sportsmed 2004 Dec;32(12):26-32

Suburban Internal Medicine, Lee, MA, 01238, USA.

Outdoor athletes, through the course of their training and competition, are constantly battling environmental effects. Cold and wind exposure can lead to frostbite, which may not be immediately apparent if the skin grows numb. Other common cold-induced conditions include Raynaud's phenomenon, cold-induced urticaria, and chilblains. Summer athletes and athletes participating at higher altitudes need to be especially vigilant for sunburn. Physicians should know when to withhold athletes from play to prevent further damage. By teaching prevention strategies, clinicians can help their patients safely enjoy outdoor sports.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3810/psm.2004.12.676DOI Listing
December 2004

Fungal infections and parasitic infestations in sports: expedient identification and treatment.

Phys Sportsmed 2004 Oct;32(10):23-33

Associates in Orthopaedic Surgery, South Burlington, VT, 05403, USA.

Common fungal infections include tinea corporis, capitis, cruris, versicolor, and pedis, as well as onychomycosis. Prevention of spread is important and involves frequent skin surveillance, avoidance of shared equipment, and regular equipment cleaning. The NCAA recommends treatment of tinea corporis and capitis infections and covering any exposed infection before return to play. Parasitic infestations occur because of the close physical contact of team members and athletes in contact sports. Both scabies and pediculosis should be treated before return to play, according to NCAA guidelines. Cutaneous larva migrans, a chronic parasitic infection caused by a hookworm, may be seen in beach volleyball players.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3810/psm.2004.10.601DOI Listing
October 2004

Cholinergic urticaria in a jogger: ruling out exercise-induced anaphylaxis.

Phys Sportsmed 2003 Jun;31(6):32-6

New West Physicians, Arvada, CO, 80005, USA.

Cholinergic urticaria is a systemic response to a rise in core temperature that can be brought on by exercise, as in this case of a 24-year-old jogger. Many cases, however, are mild. The exact pathophysiology for the release of histamines is unknown, but the resulting rash can be distressing for patients. The challenge for physicians is to differentiate exercise-induced urticaria from exercise-induced anaphylaxis, a potentially life-threatening condition. Effective management includes patient education, antihistamine use, if needed, and avoidance of precipitating triggers, such as strenuous exercise or hot showers.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3810/psm.2003.06.399DOI Listing
June 2003

Pearls.

Phys Sportsmed 1996 Mar;24(3):15

c Ponce , Puerto Rico.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00913847.1996.11947920DOI Listing
March 1996

Pearls.

Phys Sportsmed 1996 Jan;24(1):22-74q

e Pittsburgh.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00913847.1996.11947892DOI Listing
January 1996
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