Publications by authors named "William J Shergy"

5 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Evaluation of the safety of rituximab in combination with a tumor necrosis factor inhibitor and methotrexate in patients with active rheumatoid arthritis: results from a randomized controlled trial.

Arthritis Rheum 2011 Mar;63(3):622-32

Desert Medical Advances, Palm Desert, California 92260, USA.

Objective: To assess the safety of rituximab in combination with a tumor necrosis factor (TNF) inhibitor and methotrexate (MTX) in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA).

Methods: Adult patients with active RA (≥ 5 swollen and ≥ 5 tender joints) receiving a stable dose of MTX (10-25 mg/week) and stable dose of TNF inhibitor (etanercept or adalimumab) for ≥ 12 weeks were randomized 2:1 to receive one course of rituximab or placebo, given intravenously at a dose of 2 × 500 mg. The primary end point was the proportion of patients developing ≥ 1 serious infection through week 24.

Results: Fifty-one patients were treated with either rituximab or placebo in combination with background MTX and a TNF inhibitor. Baseline characteristics were generally balanced between groups, except for corticosteroid usage (36% in the rituximab arm versus 17% in the placebo arm). A serious infection (pneumonia) was observed in 1 patient (3%) in the rituximab group after 14.4 patient-years of exposure (6.95 events per 100 patient-years, 95% confidence interval 0.98-49.35), compared with none in the placebo group at week 24. Infections were reported in 18 patients (55%) and 11 patients (61%) in the rituximab and placebo groups, respectively. Grade 3 infections were reported in 3 patients (9%) receiving rituximab and in none of the patients receiving placebo. No grade 4 infections were observed, nor were there any opportunistic, fungal, or tuberculosis infections. Serious adverse events (SAEs) were reported in 2 rituximab-treated patients (pneumonia and coronary artery occlusion), whereas there were no SAEs reported in placebo-treated patients. At week 24, the percentage of patients achieving an American College of Rheumatology 20% (ACR20) improvement response was 30% in the rituximab group compared with 17% in the placebo group, and ACR50 responses were achieved by 12% and 6% of patients, respectively.

Conclusion: The preliminary safety profile of rituximab in combination with a TNF inhibitor and MTX was consistent with the safety profile of rituximab in combination with MTX in other RA trials without a TNF inhibitor, with no new safety signals observed. SAEs were numerically more frequent in the rituximab group, and there was no clear evidence of an efficacy advantage in patients receiving rituximab in combination with a TNF inhibitor and MTX.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/art.30194DOI Listing
March 2011

Selective costimulation modulation with abatacept: a look at quality-of-life outcomes in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

Authors:
William J Shergy

Semin Arthritis Rheum 2009 Jun 9;38(6):434-43. Epub 2008 Jun 9.

University of Alabama School of Medicine, Huntsville, Alabama 35801, USA.

Objectives: To highlight the importance of improving quality of life (QoL) in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and to provide a summary of the QoL benefits provided by abatacept in patients who have an inadequate response to disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs) and/or tumor necrosis factor (TNF) antagonists.

Methods: A literature search of the MEDLINE, EMBASE, and BIOSIS databases was performed using the terms "abatacept," "cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-associated antigen-4 (CTLA-4)" and "ORENCIA," with the coindexing terms: "abatacept," "CTLA-4," and "ORENCIA." Only articles presenting primary data on QoL outcomes from randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trials of abatacept were included in the review.

Results: The literature search initially yielded 220 articles. A total of 8 articles fulfilled the inclusion criteria described above and are reviewed here. In clinical trials to date, abatacept treatment has been shown to improve QoL in patients who have an inadequate response to traditional DMARDs and TNF antagonists.

Conclusions: Improvements in QoL are rated by patients as 1 of the most important benefits of an effective treatment; however, inclusion of QoL measurements in clinical trials as a measure of efficacy is a relatively recent event. Abatacept has been shown to alleviate both the physical and the emotional/social burdens that RA imposes on the patient, including improvements in day-to-day activity and reducing sleep problems and fatigue in patients with RA who have an inadequate response to DMARDs and/or TNF antagonists.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.semarthrit.2008.03.009DOI Listing
June 2009

Longterm reduction of back pain risk in women with osteoporosis treated with teriparatide compared with alendronate.

J Rheumatol 2005 Aug;32(8):1556-62

Colorado Center for Bone Research, Lakewood, 80227, USA.

Objective: To compare the effects on back pain of teriparatide versus alendronate, we analyzed the reporting of back pain in a head to head comparator trial and a followup study.

Methods: In the comparator trial, women were randomized to receive either daily self-injected teriparatide 40 microg plus an oral placebo (n = 73), or daily oral alendronate 10 mg plus self-injected placebo (n = 73). Treatment was for a median 14 months. After completion of the comparator trial, 72% of these patients enrolled in a nontreatment followup study. Adverse events were recorded at each comparator trial visit and followup study visit, and the incidence of new or worsening back pain in each group was compared.

Results: During the comparator trial, compared with women randomized to alendronate 10 mg, women randomized to teriparatide 40 microg had reduced risk for any back pain (relative risk 0.27, 95% CI 0.09-0.82) and moderate or severe back pain (relative risk 0.19, 95% CI 0.04-0.86). The differences in the reporting of back pain between the teriparatide treated women and the alendronate treated women were sustained during an interval including the comparator trial plus 18 additional months. During an interval including the comparator trial plus 30 additional months, teriparatide treated patients had numerically fewer occurrences of back pain and moderate or severe back pain.

Conclusion: Compared with women randomized to alendronate 10 mg, women randomized to teriparatide 40 microg had reduced risk of back pain during the trial and 2.5 years of followup.
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August 2005

Infliximab in the treatment of recalcitrant idiopathic orbital inflammation.

Ophthalmic Plast Reconstr Surg 2004 Sep;20(5):381-3

Department of Ophthalmology, University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis, Tennessee, USA.

A 15-year-old boy had bilateral idiopathic orbital inflammation refractory to treatment with corticosteroids. He was not only unresponsive to subsequent therapy with methotrexate but also had elevation of serum liver enzymes. In an attempt to minimize further side effects of corticosteroids and to avoid external beam radiation in an adolescent, we began treatment with infliximab, an anti-tumor necrosis-alpha antibody. His symptoms resolved and his disease has not recurred. Use of infliximab may be useful in the treatment of recalcitrant idiopathic orbital pseudotumor.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/01.iop.0000139521.38345.baDOI Listing
September 2004

Open label study to assess infliximab safety and timing of onset of clinical benefit among patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

J Rheumatol 2002 Apr;29(4):667-77

Centocor Inc., Malvern, Pennsylvania, USA.

Objective: To assess the timing of onset of clinical benefit following the initial infusion of infliximab and to obtain additional safety experience of infliximab when given in an office setting to patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). In addition, the safety of reducing the infusion time from 2 hours to 1 hour was evaluated.

Methods: Patients (n = 553) with active RA despite receiving methotrexate (MTX) were treated with infliximab 3 mg/kg given over 2 h at baseline (Week 0), and Weeks 2, 6, and 14 in this multicenter open-label trial. Patients continued to receive a stable dose of MTX (> or = 7.5 mg/wk). At selected sites, patients tolerating the first 4 infusions were eligible to receive 2 additional infusions at twice the usual infusion rate (given over 1 h). Patients returned for efficacy assessments at 48 h following the initial infusion and several times throughout study participation.

Results: By 48 h following the first infusion, significant (p < 0.001) improvements were observed in duration of morning stiffness (34% mean improvement), physician's global disease assessment scores (30%), patient's global disease assessment scores (25%), and patient's pain assessment scores (30%). By Week 16, 52 to 63% mean improvements in these efficacy variables were observed (p < 0.001), the significant improvement was maintained through the end of study participation in the subset of patients who received the additional 1 h infliximab infusions. Through 16 weeks, 10% (54/553) of patients reported an adverse event associated with at least 1 of the 4 infusion procedures; the majority were mild and transient in nature. In the subset of 197 patients who received 2 additional infusions over 1 h, no increase in the frequency or severity of infusion-related adverse events was observed compared to the 2 h infusion.

Conclusion: Infliximab administered to patients with RA in an outpatient setting resulted in significant clinical improvement within 48 h that was sustained with additional infusions. Approximately 10% of patients experienced an infusion reaction, highlighting the need for direct supervision over patient treatment. Patients who tolerated infliximab infusions given over 2 h also tolerated a 1 h infusion.
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April 2002
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