Publications by authors named "William F Huffman"

7 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Discovery of GSK1070916, a potent and selective inhibitor of Aurora B/C kinase.

J Med Chem 2010 May;53(10):3973-4001

Cancer Research, Oncology R&D, GlaxoSmithKline, Collegeville, Pennsylvania 19426, USA.

The Aurora kinases play critical roles in the regulation of mitosis and are frequently overexpressed or amplified in human tumors. Selective inhibitors may provide a new therapy for the treatment of tumors with Aurora kinase amplification. Herein we describe our lead optimization efforts within a 7-azaindole-based series culminating in the identification of GSK1070916 (17k). Key to the advancement of the series was the introduction of a 2-aryl group containing a basic amine onto the azaindole leading to significantly improved cellular activity. Compound 17k is a potent and selective ATP-competitive inhibitor of Aurora B and C with K(i)* values of 0.38 +/- 0.29 and 1.5 +/- 0.4 nM, respectively, and is >250-fold selective over Aurora A. Biochemical characterization revealed that compound 17k has an extremely slow dissociation half-life from Aurora B (>480 min), distinguishing it from clinical compounds 1 and 2. In vitro treatment of A549 human lung cancer cells with compound 17k results in a potent antiproliferative effect (EC(50) = 7 nM). Intraperitoneal administration of 17k in mice bearing human tumor xenografts leads to inhibition of histone H3 phosphorylation at serine 10 in human colon cancer (Colo205) and tumor regression in human leukemia (HL-60). Compound 17k is being progressed to human clinical trials.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/jm901870qDOI Listing
May 2010

An orally active calcium-sensing receptor antagonist that transiently increases plasma concentrations of PTH and stimulates bone formation.

Bone 2010 Feb 26;46(2):534-42. Epub 2009 Sep 26.

GlaxoSmithKline, UM 2230, 709 Swedeland Road, King of Prussia, PA 19406-2711, USA.

Daily subcutaneous administration of exogenous parathyroid hormone (PTH) promotes bone formation in patients with osteoporosis. Here we describe two novel, short-acting calcium-sensing receptor antagonists (SB-423562 and its orally bioavailable precursor, SB-423557) that elicit transient PTH release from the parathyroid gland in several preclinical species and in humans. In an ovariectomized rat model of bone loss, daily oral administration of SB-423557 promoted bone formation and improved parameters of bone strength at lumbar spine, proximal tibia and midshaft femur. Chronic administration of SB-423557 did not increase parathyroid cell proliferation in rats. In healthy human volunteers, single doses of intravenous SB-423562 and oral SB-423557 elicited transient elevations of endogenous PTH concentrations in a profile similar to that observed with subcutaneously administered PTH. Both agents were well tolerated in humans. Transient increases in serum calcium, an expected effect of increased parathyroid hormone concentrations, were observed post-dose at the higher doses of SB-423557 studied. These data constitute an early proof of principle in humans and provide the basis for further development of this class of compound as a novel, orally administered bone-forming treatment for osteoporosis.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bone.2009.09.028DOI Listing
February 2010

Novel ATP-competitive kinesin spindle protein inhibitors.

J Med Chem 2007 Oct 29;50(20):4939-52. Epub 2007 Aug 29.

Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Oncology Center of Excellence for Drug Discovery, GlaxoSmithKline, 1250 South Collegeville Road, Collegeville, Pennsylvania 19426, USA.

Kinesin spindle protein (KSP), an ATPase responsible for spindle pole separation during mitosis that is present only in proliferating cells, has become a novel and attractive anticancer target with potential for reduced side effects compared to currently available therapies. We report herein the discovery of the first known ATP-competitive inhibitors of KSP, which display a unique activity profile as compared to the known loop 5 (L5) allosteric KSP inhibitors that are currently under clinical evaluation. Optimization of this series led to the identification of biphenyl sulfamide 20, a potent KSP inhibitor with in vitro antiproliferative activity against human cells with either wild-type KSP (HCT116) or mutant KSP (HCT116 D130V). In a murine xenograft model with HCT116 D130V tumors, 20 showed significant antitumor activity following intraperitoneal dosing, providing in vivo proof-of-principle of the efficacy of an ATP-competitive KSP inhibitor versus tumors that are resistant to the other known KSP inhibitors.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/jm070435yDOI Listing
October 2007

Indole naphthyridinones as inhibitors of bacterial enoyl-ACP reductases FabI and FabK.

J Med Chem 2003 Apr;46(9):1627-35

GlaxoSmithKline Pharmaceuticals, 1250 South Collegeville Road, P.O. Box 5089, Collegeville, Pennsylvania 19426, USA.

Bacterial enoyl-ACP reductase (FabI) is responsible for catalyzing the final step of bacterial fatty acid biosynthesis and is an attractive target for the development of novel antibacterial agents. Previously we reported the development of FabI inhibitor 4 with narrow spectrum antimicrobial activity and in vivo efficacy against Staphylococcus aureus via intraperitoneal (ip) administration. Through iterative medicinal chemistry aided by X-ray crystal structure analysis, a new series of inhibitors has been developed with greatly increased potency against FabI-containing organisms. Several of these new inhibitors have potent antibacterial activity against multidrug resistant strains of S. aureus, and compound 30 demonstrates exceptional oral (po) in vivo efficacy in a S. aureus infection model in rats. While optimizing FabI inhibitory activity, compounds 29 and 30 were identified as having low micromolar FabK inhibitory activity, thereby increasing the antimicrobial spectrum of these compounds to include the FabK-containing pathogens Streptococcus pneumoniae and Enterococcus faecalis. The results described herein support the hypothesis that bacterial enoyl-ACP reductases are valid targets for antibacterial agents.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/jm0204035DOI Listing
April 2003

Phenylbutyrates as potent, orally bioavailable vitronectin receptor (integrin alphavbeta3) antagonists.

Bioorg Med Chem Lett 2003 Apr;13(8):1483-6

GlaxoSmithKline Pharmaceuticals, 1250 S. Collegeville Rd., PO Box 5089, PA 19426, USA.

In our continuing efforts to identify small molecule vitronectin receptor antagonists, we have discovered a series of phenylbutyrate derivatives, exemplified by 16, which have good potency and excellent oral bioavailability (approximately 100% in rats). This new series is derived conceptually from opening of the seven-membered ring of SB-265123.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/s0960-894x(03)00102-1DOI Listing
April 2003

Discovery of a novel and potent class of FabI-directed antibacterial agents.

Antimicrob Agents Chemother 2002 10;46(10):3118-24

Microbial, Musculoskeletal and Proliferative Diseases Center of Excellence in Drug Discovery, GlaxoSmithKline Pharmaceuticals, Collegeville, Pennsylvania 19426, USA.

Bacterial enoyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP) reductase (FabI) catalyzes the final step in each elongation cycle of bacterial fatty acid biosynthesis and is an attractive target for the development of new antibacterial agents. High-throughput screening of the Staphylococcus aureus FabI enzyme identified a novel, weak inhibitor with no detectable antibacterial activity against S. aureus. Iterative medicinal chemistry and X-ray crystal structure-based design led to the identification of compound 4 [(E)-N-methyl-N-(2-methyl-1H-indol-3-ylmethyl)-3-(7-oxo-5,6,7,8-tetrahydro-1,8-naphthyridin-3-yl)acrylamide], which is 350-fold more potent than the original lead compound obtained by high-throughput screening in the FabI inhibition assay. Compound 4 has exquisite antistaphylococci activity, achieving MICs at which 90% of isolates are inhibited more than 500 times lower than those of nine currently available antibiotics against a panel of multidrug-resistant strains of S. aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis. Furthermore, compound 4 exhibits excellent in vivo efficacy in an S. aureus infection model in rats. Biochemical and genetic approaches have confirmed that the mode of antibacterial action of compound 4 and related compounds is via inhibition of FabI. Compound 4 also exhibits weak FabK inhibitory activity, which may explain its antibacterial activity against Streptococcus pneumoniae and Enterococcus faecalis, which depend on FabK and both FabK and FabI, respectively, for their enoyl-ACP reductase function. These results show that compound 4 is representative of a new, totally synthetic series of antibacterial agents that has the potential to provide novel alternatives for the treatment of S. aureus infections that are resistant to our present armory of antibiotics.
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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC128775PMC
http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/aac.46.10.3118-3124.2002DOI Listing
October 2002

Discovery of aminopyridine-based inhibitors of bacterial enoyl-ACP reductase (FabI).

J Med Chem 2002 Jul;45(15):3246-56

GlaxoSmithKline Pharmaceuticals, 1250 South Collegeville Road, P.O. Box 5089, Collegeville, PA 19426, USA.

Bacterial enoyl-ACP reductase (FabI) catalyzes the final step in each cycle of bacterial fatty acid biosynthesis and is an attractive target for the development of new antibacterial agents. Our efforts to identify potent, selective FabI inhibitors began with screening of the GlaxoSmithKline proprietary compound collection, which identified several small-molecule inhibitors of Staphylococcus aureus FabI. Through a combination of iterative medicinal chemistry and X-ray crystal structure based design, one of these leads was developed into the novel aminopyridine derivative 9, a low micromolar inhibitor of FabI from S. aureus (IC(50) = 2.4 microM) and Haemophilus influenzae (IC(50) = 4.2 microM). Compound 9 has good in vitro antibacterial activity against several organisms, including S. aureus (MIC = 0.5 microg/mL), and is effective in vivo in a S. aureus groin abscess infection model in rats. Through FabI overexpressor and macromolecular synthesis studies, the mode of action of 9 has been confirmed to be inhibition of fatty acid biosynthesis via inhibition of FabI. Taken together, these results support FabI as a valid antibacterial target and demonstrate the potential of small-molecule FabI inhibitors for the treatment of bacterial infections.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/jm020050+DOI Listing
July 2002