Publications by authors named "Willem J du Plessis"

3 Publications

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Phenotypic analysis of peripheral B cell populations during Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection and disease.

J Inflamm (Lond) 2016 29;13:23. Epub 2016 Jul 29.

SA MRC Centre for TB Research, DST/NRF Centre of Excellence for Biomedical Tuberculosis Research, Division of Molecular Biology and Human Genetics, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Stellenbosch University, PO Box 241, Cape Town, 8000 South Africa.

Background: Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) remains an unresolved threat resulting in great annual loss of life. The role of B cells during the protective immunity to Mtb is still unclear. B cells have been described as effector cells in addition to their role as antibody producing cells during disease. Here we aim to identify and characterize the frequency of peripheral B-cell subpopulations during active Tuberculosis and over treatment response. Analysis were done for both class switched (CS) and non-class switched (NCS) phenotypes.

Methods: We recruited participants with active untreated pulmonary Tuberculosis, other lung diseases and healthy community controls. All groups were followed up for one week from recruitment and the TB cases till the end of treatment (month 6).

Results: Peripheral blood samples were collected, stained with monoclonal antibodies to CD19(+) cells, Immunoglobulin (Ig) M, plasma cells (CD 138(+)), marker of memory (CD27(+)), immune activation (CD23(+)) and acquired on a flow cytometer. Circulating Marginal zone B cells (CD19(+)IgM(+)CD23(-)CD27(+)) and memory phenotypes are able to distinguish between TB diagnosis and end of treatment. The frequency of mature B cells from TB cases are lower than that of other-lung diseases at diagnosis. A subpopulation of activated memory B cells (CD19(+)IgM(+)CD23(+)CD27(+)) cells are present at the end of TB treatment.

Conclusions: This study identified distinctive B cell subpopulations present during active TB disease and other lung disease conditions. These cell populations warrants further examination in larger studies as it may be informative as cell markers or as effectors/regulators in TB disease or TB treatment response.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12950-016-0133-4DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4966581PMC
August 2016

The Functional Response of B Cells to Antigenic Stimulation: A Preliminary Report of Latent Tuberculosis.

PLoS One 2016 6;11(4):e0152710. Epub 2016 Apr 6.

SA MRC Centre for TB Research, DST/NRF Centre of Excellence for Biomedical Tuberculosis Research, Division of Molecular Biology and Human Genetics, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Stellenbosch University, Cape Town, South Africa.

Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M.tb) remains a successful pathogen, causing tuberculosis disease numbers to constantly increase. Although great progress has been made in delineating the disease, the host-pathogen interaction is incompletely described. B cells have shown to function as both effectors and regulators of immunity via non-humoral methods in both innate and adaptive immune settings. Here we assessed specific B cell functional interaction following stimulation with a broad range of antigens within the LTBI milieu. Our results indicate that B cells readily produce pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines (including IL-1β, IL-10, IL-17, IL-21 and TNF-α) in response to stimulation. TLR4 and TLR9 based stimulations achieved the greatest secreted cytokine-production response and BCG stimulation displayed a clear preference for inducing IL-1β production. We also show that the cytokines produced by B cells are implicated strongly in cell-mediated communication and that plasma (memory) B cells (CD19+CD27+CD138+) is the subset with the greatest contribution to cytokine production. Collectively our data provides insight into B cell responses, where they are implicated in and quantifies responses from specific B cell phenotypes. These findings warrant further functional B cell research with a focus on specific B cell phenotypes under conditions of active TB disease to further our knowledge about the contribution of various cell subsets which could have implications for future vaccine development or refined B cell orientated treatment in the health setting.
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http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0152710PLOS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4822853PMC
August 2016

B cells as multi-functional players during Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection and disease.

Tuberculosis (Edinb) 2016 Mar 3;97:118-25. Epub 2015 Nov 3.

SA MRC Centre for TB Research, DST/NRF Centre of Excellence for Biomedical Tuberculosis Research, Division of Molecular Biology and Human Genetics, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Stellenbosch University, PO Box 241, Cape Town 8000, South Africa. Electronic address:

Immunity to tuberculosis is still understood to be driven and maintained by T-cell derived immune responses. With a steady influx of data, it is becoming clear that B cells, the mediators of humoral immunity, have the capacity to function in roles not previously appreciated within the traditional B cell dogma. In this review we aim to discuss B cells, from its generation through to its functioning as effectors in both the innate and adaptive immune response, within the tuberculosis domain.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.tube.2015.10.007DOI Listing
March 2016