Publications by authors named "Wil Kassenberg"

4 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Pulmonary Vein Isolation With Single Pulse Irreversible Electroporation: A First in Human Study in 10 Patients With Atrial Fibrillation.

Circ Arrhythm Electrophysiol 2020 10 8;13(10):e008192. Epub 2020 Sep 8.

Department of Cardiology, University Medical Centre Utrecht, the Netherlands (P.L., R.v.E., M.H.A.G., W.K., F.H.M.W., P.A.D.).

Background: Irreversible electroporation (IRE) is a promising new nonthermal ablation technology for pulmonary vein (PV) isolation in patients with atrial fibrillation. Experimental data suggest that IRE ablation produces large enough lesions without the risk of PV stenosis, artery, nerve, or esophageal damage. This study aimed to investigate the feasibility and safety of single pulse IRE PV isolation in patients with atrial fibrillation.

Methods: Ten patients with symptomatic paroxysmal or persistent atrial fibrillation underwent single pulse IRE PV isolation under general anesthesia. Three-dimensional reconstruction and electroanatomical voltage mapping (EnSite Precision, Abbott) of left atrium and PVs were performed using a conventional circular mapping catheter. PV isolation was performed by delivering nonarcing, nonbarotraumatic 6 ms, 200 J direct current IRE applications via a custom nondeflectable 14-polar circular IRE ablation catheter with a variable hoop diameter (16-27 mm). A deflectable sheath (Agilis, Abbott) was used to maneuver the ablation catheter. A minimum of 2 IRE applications with slightly different catheter positions were delivered per vein to achieve circular tissue contact, even if PV potentials were abolished after the first application. Bidirectional PV isolation was confirmed with the circular mapping catheter and a post ablation voltage map. After a 30-minute waiting period, adenosine testing (30 mg) was used to reveal dormant PV conduction.

Results: All 40 PVs could be successfully isolated with a mean of 2.4±0.4 IRE applications per PV. Mean delivered peak voltage and peak current were 2154±59 V and 33.9±1.6 A, respectively. No PV reconnections occurred during the waiting period and adenosine testing. No periprocedural complications were observed.

Conclusions: In the 10 patients of this first-in-human study, acute bidirectional electrical PV isolation could be achieved safely by single pulse IRE ablation.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1161/CIRCEP.119.008192DOI Listing
October 2020

Time matters: adenosine testing immediately after pulmonary vein isolation does not substitute a waiting period.

Europace 2017 Jul;19(7):1140-1145

Division of Heart and Lungs, Department of Cardiology, University Medical Center Utrecht, Heidelberglaan 100, 3584 CX Utrecht, The Netherlands.

Aims: Adenosine testing can reveal dormant pulmonary vein (PV) conduction after PV antrum isolation (PVAI). However, the optimal timing for adenosine administration is unknown. We hypothesized that adenosine testing immediately after PVAI reliably reveals PV reconnection and thereby eliminates the need for an observation period.

Methods And Results: Fifty patients underwent PVAI. Immediately after isolation of a PV pair, adenosine was administered. Both PV pairs were separately tested. If adenosine restored PV conduction, PVs were re-isolated. During a ≥30 min observation period after immediate adenosine-guided isolation, spontaneous reconnection was assessed and reconnected PVs were re-isolated. After the observation period, adenosine testing was repeated. Immediate adenosine testing revealed dormant conduction in 10.4% of the left PVs and 16.3% of the right PVs. All PVs were successfully re-isolated. During a mean observation period of 36 ± 10 min, spontaneous reconnection occurred in 8.2% of the left and 16.3% of the right PVs. None of these PVs had shown reconnection during immediate testing. Late adenosine testing revealed dormant conduction in 12.5% of the left and 16.3% of the right PVs. In patients without reconnection during immediate adenosine testing, 14.6% of the left PVs and 30.6% of the right PVs showed either spontaneous reconnection or restored PV conduction during late adenosine testing.

Conclusion: Adenosine testing immediately after PVAI does not reliably exclude later spontaneous or adenosine-induced PV reconnection. Adenosine testing should be performed after an appropriate observation period to reduce risk of PV reconnection.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/europace/euw173DOI Listing
July 2017

Five-year efficacy of pulmonary vein antrum isolation as a primary ablation strategy for atrial fibrillation: a single-centre cohort study.

Europace 2016 Sep 2;18(9):1335-42. Epub 2016 Feb 2.

Division of Heart and Lungs, Department of Cardiology, University Medical Center Utrecht, Heidelberglaan 100, 3584CX Utrecht, The Netherlands

Aims: Pulmonary vein antrum isolation (PVAI) is the cornerstone of atrial fibrillation (AF) ablation. There is an ongoing discussion on whether and when to add substrate modification to PVAI. This study evaluates (1) long-term efficacy of PVAI as a primary ablation strategy in all patients independently from AF type and (2) predictors of arrhythmia recurrence.

Methods And Results: A total of 509 consecutive patients (mean age 57 years, 38.9% non-paroxysmal AF) with AF underwent PVAI. In redo procedures, ablation was restricted to re-pulmonary vein (PV) isolation in case of PV reconnection. If the PVs were found to be isolated, substrate modification was performed. In total, 774 procedures were performed. Mean follow-up duration after the first and last ablation was, respectively, 66 ± 23 and 55 ± 25 months. A single PVAI was sufficient in restoring and maintaining long-term sinus rhythm in 41.3% (n = 210) of patients. Multiple procedures (mean 1.5) with re-PV isolation increased long-term success to 58.3% (n = 297). Additional substrate modification (n = 70) increased success to 62.5% (n = 318). After the last ablation, 87.5% of patients experienced success or significant clinical improvement on or off antiarrhythmic drugs. The incidence of left-sided atrial flutter or atrial tachycardia was 5% after PVAI and increased to 32% after additional substrate modification. Independent predictors for arrhythmia recurrence after the last ablation were non-paroxysmal AF, female sex, body mass index, hypertension, and AF duration.

Conclusion: Five-year freedom of atrial tachyarrhythmia could be achieved by PVAI as primary ablation strategy in 58.3% of patients. Additional substrate modification only moderately increased overall success.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/europace/euv439DOI Listing
September 2016

Impact of pulmonary vein antrum isolation on left atrial size and function in patients with atrial fibrillation.

J Interv Card Electrophysiol 2014 Apr 7;39(3):201-9. Epub 2013 Dec 7.

Department of Cardiology, E03.511, University Medical Center, PO Box 85500, 3508 GA, Utrecht, The Netherlands.

Purpose: The success of PVAI in eliminating AF has been proven; however, its impact on the LA remains uncertain. This study aimed to determine the impact of pulmonary vein antrum isolation (PVAI) on left atrial (LA) size and function in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF).

Methods: Consecutive patients with AF were included (n = 206). Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed before and after PVAI in all patients. A subgroup (n = 52) underwent delayed enhancement MRI. Maximal LA volume (LAVmax) and minimal LA volume (LAVmin) were assessed by Simpson's rule. LA function was determined by calculating LA ejection fraction (LA EF). LA fibrosis was manually encircled and summed in the region of interest.

Results: Single procedure success rate was 64 %. LAVmax decreased post-ablation in all patients (125.1 to 111.9 ml, p < 0.001). LAVmin only decreased in patients with a successful outcome post-ablation (65.6 to 58.8 ml, p < 0.001). As a result, LA EF only showed a marked reduction in patients with AF recurrences (42.7 % to 37.9 %, p < 0.001). Post-ablation LA fibrosis could be visualized in 77 % of patients who underwent delayed enhancement MRI (mean amount 1.4 cm(3)). LA fibrosis showed no correlation with the decrease in LAVmax or LA EF.

Conclusions: PVAI resulted in a reduction of LAVmax in all patients, indicating an effect of ablation induced fibrosis. LAVmin only decreased in patients with a successful outcome, indicating an effect of reverse atrial remodeling. As a result, LA function post-ablation was preserved in patients with a successful outcome and decreased in patients with AF recurrence.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10840-013-9860-0DOI Listing
April 2014