Publications by authors named "Wesley Daniel"

14 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

A framework to integrate innovations in invasion science for proactive management.

Biol Rev Camb Philos Soc 2022 08 22;97(4):1712-1735. Epub 2022 Apr 22.

Flathead Lake Biological Station, University of Montana, 32125 Bio Station Lane, Polson, MT, 59860, U.S.A.

Invasive alien species (IAS) are a rising threat to biodiversity, national security, and regional economies, with impacts in the hundreds of billions of U.S. dollars annually. Proactive or predictive approaches guided by scientific knowledge are essential to keeping pace with growing impacts of invasions under climate change. Although the rapid development of diverse technologies and approaches has produced tools with the potential to greatly accelerate invasion research and management, innovation has far outpaced implementation and coordination. Technological and methodological syntheses are urgently needed to close the growing implementation gap and facilitate interdisciplinary collaboration and synergy among evolving disciplines. A broad review is necessary to demonstrate the utility and relevance of work in diverse fields to generate actionable science for the ongoing invasion crisis. Here, we review such advances in relevant fields including remote sensing, epidemiology, big data analytics, environmental DNA (eDNA) sampling, genomics, and others, and present a generalized framework for distilling existing and emerging data into products for proactive IAS research and management. This integrated workflow provides a pathway for scientists and practitioners in diverse disciplines to contribute to applied invasion biology in a coordinated, synergistic, and scalable manner.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/brv.12859DOI Listing
August 2022

Strategic considerations for invasive species managers in the utilization of environmental DNA (eDNA): steps for incorporating this powerful surveillance tool.

Manag Biol Invasion 2021 Jul;12(3):747-775

US Department of Agriculture Forest Service, National Genomics Center for Wildlife and Fish Conservation, Rocky Mountain Research Station, 800 E Beckwith Ave, Missoula, MT 59801, USA.

Invasive species surveillance programs can utilize environmental DNA sampling and analysis to provide information on the presence of invasive species. Wider utilization of eDNA techniques for invasive species surveillance may be warranted. This paper covers topics directed towards invasive species managers and eDNA practitioners working at the intersection of eDNA techniques and invasive species surveillance. It provides background information on the utility of eDNA for invasive species management and points to various examples of its use across federal and international programs. It provides information on 1) why an invasive species manager should consider using eDNA, 2) deciding if eDNA can help with the manager's surveillance needs, 3) important components to operational implementation, and 4) a high-level overview of the technical steps necessary for eDNA analysis. The goal of this paper is to assist invasive species managers in deciding if, when, and how to use eDNA for surveillance. If eDNA use is elected, the paper provides guidance on steps to ensure a clear understanding of the strengths and limitation of the methods and how results can be best utilized in the context of invasive species surveillance.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3391/mbi.2021.12.3.15DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8958948PMC
July 2021

CBR regulates soluble leptin receptor levels via CHOP, contributing to hepatic leptin resistance.

Elife 2020 11 19;9. Epub 2020 Nov 19.

Obesity and Metabolism Laboratory, Institute for Drug Research, School of Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Jerusalem, Israel.

The soluble isoform of leptin receptor (sOb-R), secreted by the liver, regulates leptin bioavailability and bioactivity. Its reduced levels in diet-induced obesity (DIO) contribute to hyperleptinemia and leptin resistance, effects that are regulated by the endocannabinoid (eCB)/CBR system. Here we show that pharmacological activation/blockade and genetic overexpression/deletion of hepatic CBR modulates sOb-R levels and hepatic leptin resistance. Interestingly, peripheral CBR blockade failed to reverse DIO-induced reduction of sOb-R levels, increased fat mass and dyslipidemia, and hepatic steatosis in mice lacking C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP), whereas direct activation of CBR in wild-type hepatocytes reduced sOb-R levels in a CHOP-dependent manner. Moreover, CHOP stimulation increased sOb-R expression and release via a direct regulation of its promoter, while CHOP deletion reduced leptin sensitivity. Our findings highlight a novel molecular aspect by which the hepatic eCB/CBR system is involved in the development of hepatic leptin resistance and in the regulation of sOb-R levels via CHOP.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.60771DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7728447PMC
November 2020

Defining the Construct of Synthetic Androgen Intoxication: An Application of General Brain Arousal.

Front Psychol 2018 29;9:390. Epub 2018 Mar 29.

Eating and Weight Disorders Program, Department of Psychiatry, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY, United States.

Synthetic androgens (i. e., anabolic-androgenic steroids) are the primary component to the majority of problematic appearance and performance enhancing drug (APED) use. Despite evidence that these substances are associated with increased risk for aggression, violence, body image disturbances, and polypharmacy and can develop a pattern of chronic use consistent with drug dependence, there are no formal definitions of androgen intoxication. Consequently, the purpose of this paper is to establish a testable theory of androgen intoxication. We present evidence and theorize that synthetic androgen intoxication can be defined by a pattern of poor self-regulation characterized by increased propensity for a range of behaviors (e.g., aggression, sex, drug seeking, exercise, etc.) via androgen mediated effects on general brain arousal. This theory posits that androgens reduce threshold for emotional reactivity, motor response, and alertness to sensory stimuli and disrupt inhibitory control over the behaviors associated with synthetic androgen use. These changes result from alteration to basic neurocircuitry that amplifies limbic activation and reduces top-down cortical control. The implications for this definition are to inform APED specific hypotheses about the behavioral and psychological effects of APED use and provide a basis for establishing clinical, legal, and public health guidelines to address the use and misuse of these substances.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fpsyg.2018.00390DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5885244PMC
March 2018

Metabolic Profiling of CB1 Neutral Antagonists.

Methods Enzymol 2017 10;593:199-215. Epub 2017 Jul 10.

Obesity and Metabolism Laboratory, Institute for Drug Research, School of Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Jerusalem, Israel.

PIMSR is among the first neutral antagonists for the CB1R and was demonstrated pharmacologically to bind to the CB1R, yet not alter calcium flux. It was further shown computationally to be able to stabilize both the active and inactive states of CB1R revealing the molecular interactions that mechanistically afford the property of neutral antagonism. PIMSR shows dramatic positive effects in reducing weight, food intake, and adiposity as well as in improving glycemic control and lipid homeostasis in high-fat diet-induced obese mice, but also shows increased ALT and liver weight as markers of liver injury with chronic administration. Further, in a separate study, 3-day administration of PIMSR in C57BL/6J mice, hepatic steatosis from an acute administration of high of ethanol was significantly reduced. Also, it partially prevented alcohol-induced increases in ALT, AST, and LDH. The differences in ALT levels in obese and nonobese mice under different test paradigms are unlikely to be due to neutral antagonism itself since other neutral antagonists (AM6545) do not exhibit liver injury. The brain levels of low micromolar would support significant brain CB1 receptor occupancy (re: Ki=17nM), thus potentially including both CNS and peripheral influences on the observed weight loss. Overall, these studies suggest that marked improvements in aspects of metabolic disease and alcoholic steatosis can be realized with CB1R neutral antagonists and hence warrants the exploration of further members of this class of cannabinoid ligands.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/bs.mie.2017.06.025DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5802864PMC
April 2018

Assessment of dam effects on streams and fish assemblages of the conterminous USA.

Sci Total Environ 2017 May 21;586:879-889. Epub 2017 Feb 21.

Department of Fisheries and Wildlife, Michigan State University, 480 Wilson Rd., Room 13 Natural Resources Building, East Lansing, MI 48824, USA.

Despite the prevalence of damming as a global disturbance to river habitats, detailed reach-based assessments of the ecological effects of dams are lacking, particularly across large spatial extents. Using data from nearly 50,000 large dams, we assessed stream network fragmentation and flow alteration by large dams for streams of the conterminous USA. We developed 21 dam metrics characterizing a diversity of dam influences operating at both localized (e.g., distances-to-dams) and landscape scales (e.g., cumulative reservoir storage throughout stream networks) for every stream reach in the study region. We further evaluated how dams have affected stream fish assemblages within large ecoregions using more than 37,000 stream fish samples. Streams have been severely fragmented by large dams, with the number of stream segments increasing by 801% compared to free-flowing streams in the absence of dams and a staggering 79% of stream length is disconnected from their outlet (i.e., oceans and Great Lakes). Flow alteration metrics demonstrate a landscape-scale disturbance of dams, resulting in total upstream reservoir storage volumes exceeding estimated annual discharge volumes of many of the nation's largest rivers. Further, we show large-scale changes in fish assemblages with dams. Species adapted to lentic habitats increase with dams across the conterminous USA, while rheophils, lithophils, and intolerant fishes decrease with dams. Overall, fragmentation and flow alteration by dams have affected fish assemblages as much or more than other anthropogenic stressors, with dam effects generally increasing with stream size. Dam-induced stream fragmentation and flow alteration are critical natural resource issues. This study emphasizes the importance of considering dams as a landscape-scale disturbance to river habitats along with the need to assess differential effects that dams may have on river habitats and the fishes they support. Together, these insights are essential for more effective conservation of stream resources and biotic communities globally.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.scitotenv.2017.02.067DOI Listing
May 2017

Development of an optical microscopy system for automated bubble cloud analysis: publisher's note.

Appl Opt 2016 Sep;55(26):7392

This note reports changes to the author list and additional funding sources for [Appl. Opt.55, 6102 (2016)].APOPAI0003-693510.1364/AO.55.006102.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1364/AO.55.007392DOI Listing
September 2016

Development of an optical microscopy system for automated bubble cloud analysis.

Appl Opt 2016 Aug;55(22):6102-7

Recently, the number of uses of bubbles has begun to increase dramatically, with medicine, biofuel production, and wastewater treatment just some of the industries taking advantage of bubble properties, such as high mass transfer. As a result, more and more focus is being placed on the understanding and control of bubble formation processes and there are currently numerous techniques utilized to facilitate this understanding. Acoustic bubble sizing (ABS) and laser scattering techniques are able to provide information regarding bubble size and size distribution with minimal data processing, a major advantage over current optical-based direct imaging approaches. This paper demonstrates how direct bubble-imaging methods can be improved upon to yield high levels of automation and thus data comparable to ABS and laser scattering. We also discuss the added benefits of the direct imaging approaches and how it is possible to obtain considerable additional information above and beyond that which ABS and laser scattering can supply. This work could easily be exploited by both industrial-scale operations and small-scale laboratory studies, as this straightforward and cost-effective approach is highly transferrable and intuitive to use.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1364/AO.55.006102DOI Listing
August 2016

Influence of Surface Wettability on Microbubble Formation.

Langmuir 2016 Feb 27;32(5):1269-78. Epub 2016 Jan 27.

Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, University of Sheffield , Mappin Street, Sheffield S1 3JD, United Kingdom.

The production and utilization of microbubbles are rapidly becoming of major importance in a number of global applications, from biofuel production to medical imaging contrast agents. Many aspects of bubble formation have been studied, with diffuser characteristics (such as pore size, pore orientation) and gas flow rate all being shown to influence the bubble formation process. However, very little attention has been paid to the influence of surface wettability of the diffuser and the detailed role it plays at the triple interface of gas-liquid-diffuser. Here, we investigate how the wettability of the diffuser surface impacts upon the dynamics of the bubble formation process and examine the effect both at the orifice and upon the bubble cloud produced as a result of the engineered wetting variations. Experimental data shown here indicate the presence of a switching point at a contact angle of θ = 90°, where bubble size vastly changes. When a surface exhibits a contact angle below 90°, bubbles emitted from it are considerably smaller than those emitted from a surface with an angle in excess of 90°. This effect is observable over flow rates ranging from 2.5 to 60 mL min(-1) from a single pore, an array of controlled pores, and the industrially relevant and commercially available sintered metals and sintered ceramic diffusers. It is also observed for both thiol and silane modified surfaces, encompassing a range of contact angles from 10° to 110°. In addition, the importance of the diffuser plate's surface topography is discussed, with elevated roughness acting to reduce the effect of surface chemistry in some instances.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/acs.langmuir.5b03743DOI Listing
February 2016

Probability of a shockable presenting rhythm as a function of EMS response time.

Prehosp Emerg Care 2014 Apr-Jun;18(2):224-30. Epub 2014 Jan 8.

Introduction: Survival from cardiac arrest is associated with having a shockable presenting rhythm (VF/pulseless VT) upon EMS arrival. A concern is that several studies have reported a decline in the incidence of VF/PVT over the past few decades. One plausible explanation is that contemporary cardiovascular therapies, such as increased use of statin and beta blocker drugs, may shorten the duration of VF/PVT after arrest. As a result, EMS response time would become an increasingly important factor in the likelihood of a shockable presenting rhythm, and consequently, cardiac arrest survival.

Objective: To develop a model describing the likelihood of shockable presenting rhythm as a function of EMS response time.

Methods: We conducted a retrospective observational study of cardiac arrest using the North Carolina Prehospital Care Reporting System (PreMIS). Inclusionary criteria consisted of adult patients suffering nontraumatic cardiac arrests witnessed by a layperson between January 1 and June 30, 2012. Patients defibrillated prior to EMS arrival were excluded. Chi-square and t-tests were used to analyze the relationship between shockable presenting rhythm and patient age, gender, and race; response time measured as elapsed minutes between 9-1-1 call receipt and scene arrival; and bystander CPR. Logistic regression was used to calculate the adjusted odds ratio (OR) of shockable presenting rhythm as a function of response time while controlling for statistically significant covariates.

Results: A total of 599 patients met inclusion criteria. Overall, VF/PVT was observed in 159 patients (26.5%). VF/PVT was less likely with increasing EMS response time (OR 0.92, 95% CI = 0.87-0.97, p < 0.01) and age (OR 0.98, 95% CI = 0.97-0.99, p < 0.01), while males (OR 1.98, 95% CI = 1.29-3.03, p < 0.01) and Caucasians (OR 1.86, 95% CI = 1.17-2.95, p < 0.01) were more likely to have shockable presenting rhythm. Bystander CPR was not associated with shockable presenting rhythm, although EMS response time was longer among patients with bystander CPR compared to those without (9.83 vs. 8.83 minutes, p < 0.01).

Conclusions: We found that for every one minute of added ambulance response time, the odds of shockable presenting rhythm declined by 8%. This information could prove useful for EMS managers tasked with developing EMS system response strategies for cardiac arrest management.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3109/10903127.2013.851308DOI Listing
November 2014

Peripheral cannabinoid-1 receptor inverse agonism reduces obesity by reversing leptin resistance.

Cell Metab 2012 Aug 26;16(2):167-79. Epub 2012 Jul 26.

Laboratory of Physiologic Studies, National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA.

Obesity-related leptin resistance manifests in loss of leptin's ability to reduce appetite and increase energy expenditure. Obesity is also associated with increased activity of the endocannabinoid system, and CB(1) receptor (CB(1)R) inverse agonists reduce body weight and the associated metabolic complications, although adverse neuropsychiatric effects halted their therapeutic development. Here we show that in mice with diet-induced obesity (DIO), the peripherally restricted CB(1)R inverse agonist JD5037 is equieffective with its brain-penetrant parent compound in reducing appetite, body weight, hepatic steatosis, and insulin resistance, even though it does not occupy central CB(1)R or induce related behaviors. Appetite and weight reduction by JD5037 are mediated by resensitizing DIO mice to endogenous leptin through reversing the hyperleptinemia by decreasing leptin expression and secretion by adipocytes and increasing leptin clearance via the kidney. Thus, inverse agonism at peripheral CB(1)R not only improves cardiometabolic risk in obesity but has antiobesity effects by reversing leptin resistance.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cmet.2012.07.002DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3832894PMC
August 2012

Optimization of solvents for effective isolation of colchicines from Gloriosa superba L. seeds.

Nat Prod Res 2007 May;21(5):469-72

SPIC Science Foundation, Chemical Technology Division, SPIC Nagar, Thoothukudi 628 005, Tamil Nadu, India.

To meet the strong demand of colchicine an attempt is made to optimize the solvent system for isolation of colchicine. Gloriosa superba dried seed powder was extracted by using different solvents. Maximum yield of colchicine was obtained when extracted with water and alcohol in the ratio of 50 : 50.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/14786410601129507DOI Listing
May 2007

Vitex agnus-castus is a preferred host plant for Hyalesthes obsoletus.

J Chem Ecol 2005 May;31(5):1051-63

Northern Research and Development, Kiryat Sh 'mona, Israel.

Hyalesthes obsoletus Signoret (Homoptera: Cixiidae) is a polyphagous planthopper that transmits stolbur phytoplasma (a causative agent of "yellows" disease) to various weeds, members of the Solanaceae, and wine grapes (Vitis vinifera L.) in Europe and the Middle East. Planthoppers were collected by hand vacuuming eight native plant species. Vitex agnus-castus L., a shrub in the Verbenaceae, hosted the largest number of H. obsoletus, although Olea europaea L. also served as a host for adults. Using a Y-olfactometer, we compared the planthoppers relative preference for V. agnus-castus, Convolvulus arvensis, and V. vinifera. V. agnus-castus was more attractive to both male and female H. obsoletus than the other plants. H. obsoletus antennal response was stronger to volatiles collected from V. agnuscastus than from Cabernet Sauvignon variety of V. vinifera. To determine if V. agnus-castus would serve as a reservoir for the pathogen, H. obsoletus were collected from leaf and stem samples of native V. agnus-castus, and were tested by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for the presence of phytoplasma DNA. While 14% and 25% (2003 and 2004, respectively) of the insects tested positive for phytoplasma DNA, none of the plant samples tested positive. To determine if V. agnus-castus could serve as a host plant for the development of the planthopper, we placed emergence cages beneath field shrubs and enclosed wild-caught H. obsoletus in a cage with a potted young shrub. We found adult H. obsoletus in the emergence cases and planthopper nymphs in the soil of the potted plant. We concluded that V. agnus-castus is attractive to H. obsoletus, which seems to be refractory to phytoplasma infections and warrants further testing as a trap plant near vineyards.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10886-005-4247-zDOI Listing
May 2005

Insect antifeedant activity of tetranortriterpenoids from the Rutales. A perusal of structural relations.

J Agric Food Chem 2002 Jul;50(16):4484-90

Centre for Natural Products, SPIC Science Foundation, 64, Mount Road, Guindy, Chennai 600 032, India.

Structure-related insect antifeedant relationship of 56 limonoids (both natural and modified) from the plants belonging to the order Rutales was attempted considering substitution patterns, oxidation states, and hydrophobicity, as well as distant geometry derived through conformational analysis on molecular modeling. Orientation of the furan and hydroxylation at specific carbon sites have been shown to influence the antifeedancy against the fall armyworm, Spodoptera litura.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/jf025534tDOI Listing
July 2002
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