Publications by authors named "Wenying Chai"

9 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Discovery of a Gut-Restricted JAK Inhibitor for the Treatment of Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

J Med Chem 2020 03 16;63(6):2915-2929. Epub 2020 Mar 16.

Janssen Research and Development, 3210 Merryfield Row, San Diego, California 92121, United States.

To identify Janus kinase (JAK) inhibitors that selectively target gastrointestinal tissues with limited systemic exposures, a class of imidazopyrrolopyridines with a range of physical properties was prepared and evaluated. We identified compounds with low intrinsic permeability and determined a correlation between permeability and physicochemical properties, clogP and tPSA, for a subset of compounds. This low intrinsic permeability translated into compounds displaying high colonic exposure and low systemic exposure after oral dosing at 25 mg/kg in mouse. In a mouse PK/PD model, oral dosing of lead compound demonstrated dose-dependent inhibition of pSTAT phosphorylation in colonic explants post-oral dose but low systemic exposure and no measurable systemic pharmacodynamic activity. We thus demonstrate the utility of JAK inhibitors with low intrinsic permeability as a feasible approach to develop gut-restricted, pharmacologically active molecules with a potential advantage over systemically available compounds that are limited by systemic on-target adverse events.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/acs.jmedchem.9b01439DOI Listing
March 2020

LncRNA DSCAM-AS1 acts as a sponge of miR-137 to enhance Tamoxifen resistance in breast cancer.

J Cell Physiol 2019 03 10;234(3):2880-2894. Epub 2018 Sep 10.

Yunnan Cancer Hospital, The Third Affiliated Hospital of Kunming Medical University, Kunming, Yunnan, China.

Objective: To investigate the influence of long noncoding RNA (lncRNA) DSCAM-AS1 on the propagation and apoptosis of Tamoxifen-resistant (TR) breast cancer cells via regulation of mircoRNA (miR)-137 and epidermal growth factor receptor pathway substrate 8 (EPS8).

Methods: Data of GSE5840 downloaded from the Gene Expression Omnibus database were utilized to screen out aberrantly expressed lncRNA and messenger RNA in breast cancer tissue samples. The expressions of DSCAM-AS1, miR-137, and EPS8 were determined by quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). Cell lines were screened by half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC ). 3-(4,5-dimethyl-2-thiazolyl)-2,5-diphenyl-2-H-tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay and the flow cytometry assay were used to detect cell proliferation, apoptosis, and cell cycle. The relationship among DSCAM-AS1, miR-137, and EPS8 was studied by miRcode, TargetScan, and Pearson correlation coefficient. A xenograft mouse model experiment was performed to demonstrate the effect of DSCAM-AS1 and EPS8 on tumor growth in vivo.

Results: LncRNA DSCAM-AS1 and EPS8 were significantly upregulated, whereas miR-137 was downregulated in TR tissues. DSCAM-AS1 could promote the Tamoxifen resistance of breast cancer, and it was negatively correlated with miR-137, whereas positively correlated with the expression of EPS8 in TR breast cancer tissues. Furthermore, miR-137 could inhibit tumor development and arrest cell cycle at the G0/G1 phase by targeting the 3'-UTR of EPS8. DSCAM-AS1 targeted miR-137 and EPS8 to promote propagation of TR breast cancer cells and inhibit cell apoptosis.

Conclusion: LncRNA DSCAM-AS1 acts as a competing endogenous RNA of miR-137 and regulates EPS8 to promote cell reproduction and suppresses cell apoptosis in TR breast cancer.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jcp.27105DOI Listing
March 2019

The discovery of potent selective NPY Y(2) antagonists.

Bioorg Med Chem Lett 2013 Jul 22;23(14):4141-4. Epub 2013 May 22.

Janssen Research & Development LLC, 3210 Merryfield Row, San Diego, CA 92121, USA.

A series of small molecules with a piperidinyl core were synthesized and tested for binding affinity (IC50) at human Neuropeptide Y Y2 receptor. Various amide related analogs (ureas, reversed amides, and sulfonamides) were evaluated. Several potent and selective NPY Y2 antagonists were identified.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bmcl.2013.05.038DOI Listing
July 2013

Translational evaluation of JNJ-18038683, a 5-hydroxytryptamine type 7 receptor antagonist, on rapid eye movement sleep and in major depressive disorder.

J Pharmacol Exp Ther 2012 Aug 8;342(2):429-40. Epub 2012 May 8.

Janssen Research & Development, LLC, 3210 Merryfield Row, San Diego, CA 92109, USA.

In rodents 5-hydroxytryptamine type 7 (5-HT(7)) receptor blockade has been shown to be effective in models of depression and to increase the latency to rapid eye movement (REM) sleep and decrease REM duration. In the clinic, the REM sleep reduction observed with many antidepressants may serve as a biomarker. We report here the preclinical and clinical evaluation of a 5-HT(7) receptor antagonist, (3-(4-chlorophenyl)-1,4,5,6,7,8-hexahydro-1-(phenylmethyl)pyrazolo[3,4-d]azepine 2-hydroxy-1,2,3-propanetricarboxylate) (JNJ-18038683). In rodents, JNJ-18038683 increased the latency to REM sleep and decreased REM duration, and this effect was maintained after repeated administration for 7 days. The compound was effective in the mouse tail suspension test. JNJ-18038683 enhanced serotonin transmission, antidepressant-like behavior, and REM sleep suppression induced by citalopram in rodents. In healthy human volunteers JNJ-18038683 prolonged REM latency and reduced REM sleep duration, demonstrating that the effect of 5-HT(7) blockade on REM sleep translated from rodents to humans. Like in rats, JNJ-18038683 enhanced REM sleep suppression induced by citalopram in humans, although a drug-drug interaction could not be ruled out. In a double-blind, active, and placebo-controlled clinical trial in 225 patients suffering from major depressive disorder, neither treatment with pharmacologically active doses of JNJ-18038683 or escitalopram separated from placebo, indicating a failed study lacking assay sensitivity. Post hoc analyses using an enrichment window strategy, where all the efficacy data from sites with an implausible high placebo response [placebo group Montgomery-Åsberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS) < = 12] and from sites with no placebo response (MADRS > = 28) are removed, there was a clinically meaningful difference between JNJ-18038683 and placebo. Further clinical studies are required to characterize the potential antidepressant efficacy of JNJ-18038683.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1124/jpet.112.193995DOI Listing
August 2012

Preparation and biological evaluation of indole, benzimidazole, and thienopyrrole piperazine carboxamides: potent human histamine h(4) antagonists.

J Med Chem 2005 Dec;48(26):8289-98

Johnson & Johnson Pharmaceutical Research and Development, L.L.C., 3210 Merryfield Row, San Diego, California 92121, USA.

Three series of H(4) receptor ligands, derived from indoly-2-yl-(4-methyl-piperazin-1-yl)-methanones, have been synthesized and their structure-activity relationships evaluated for activity at the H(4) receptor in competitive binding and functional assays. In all cases, substitution of small lipophilic groups in the 4 and 5-positions led to increased activity in a [(3)H]histamine radiolabeled ligand competitive binding assay. In vitro metabolism and initial pharmacokinetic studies were performed on selected compounds leading to the identification of indole 8 and benzimidazole 40 as potent H(4) antagonists with the potential for further development. In addition, both 8 and 40 demonstrated efficacy in in vitro mast cell and eosinophil chemotaxis assays.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/jm0502081DOI Listing
December 2005

Novel non-peptidic neuropeptide Y Y2 receptor antagonists.

Bioorg Med Chem Lett 2004 Mar;14(5):1239-42

Johnson & Johnson Pharmaceutical Research and Development, L.L.C., 3210 Merryfield Row, San Diego, CA 92121, USA.

Through SAR studies of a piperidinylindoline cinnamide HTS lead, the first potent, non-peptide, low molecular weight selective Neuropeptide Y Y2 (NPY Y2) antagonists have been synthesized. The SAR studies around the piperidinyl, the indolinyl, and the cinnamyl moieties are discussed.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bmcl.2003.12.057DOI Listing
March 2004

The first potent and selective non-imidazole human histamine H4 receptor antagonists.

J Med Chem 2003 Sep;46(19):3957-60

Johnson & Johnson Pharmaceutical Research and Development, L.L.C, 3210 Merryfield Row, San Diego, California 92121, USA.

Following the discovery of the human histamine H4 receptor, a high throughput screen of our corporate compound collection identified compound 6 as a potential lead. Investigation of the SAR resulted in the discovery of novel compounds 10e and 10l, which are the first potent and selective histamine H4 receptor antagonists to be described.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/jm0341047DOI Listing
September 2003

Non-imidazole heterocyclic histamine H3 receptor antagonists.

Bioorg Med Chem Lett 2003 May;13(10):1767-70

Johnson & Johnson Pharmaceutical Research and Development L. L. C., 3210 Merryfield Row, San Diego, CA 92121, USA.

Continued exploration of the SAR around the lead imidazopyridine histamine H(3) antagonist 1 has led to the discovery of several related series of heterocyclic histamine H(3) antagonists. The synthesis and SAR of indolizine, indole and pyrazolopyridine based compounds are now described.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/s0960-894x(03)00299-3DOI Listing
May 2003

Reconsideration of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)(7) receptor distribution using [(3)H]5-carboxamidotryptamine and [(3)H]8-hydroxy-2-(di-n-propylamino)tetraline: analysis in brain of 5-HT(1A) knockout and 5-HT(1A/1B) double-knockout mice.

J Pharmacol Exp Ther 2002 Jul;302(1):240-8

Johnson & Johnson Pharmaceutical Research and Development L.L.C, 3210 Merryfield Row, San Diego, CA 92121, USA.

The characterization and anatomical distribution of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)(7) receptor binding sites in brain tissue has been hampered by the lack of a specific radioligand. In the present autoradiographic study, we took advantage of 5-HT(1A) knockout and 5-HT(1A/1B) double-knockout mice to revisit the pharmacological characterization and anatomical localization of 5-HT(7) binding sites in mouse brain using [(3)H]5-carboxamidotryptamine (5-CT) and [(3)H]8-hydroxy-2-(di-n-propylamino)tetraline (8-OH-DPAT). The distribution pattern of [(3)H]5-CT binding sites (2 nM) in the brain of mice lacking the 5-HT(1A/1B) receptor was scarce and confined to the septum, globus pallidus, thalamus, hypothalamus, amygdala, cortex, and substantia nigra. The low densities of [(3)H]5-CT binding sites detected in septum, thalamus, hypothalamus, amygdala, and cortex were displaced by 10 microM of the selective 5-HT(7) receptor antagonist (R)-3-(2-(2-(4-methylpiperidin-1-yl) ethyl)pyrrolidine-1-sulfonyl) phenol (SB-269970). The SB-269970-insensitive [(3)H]5-CT binding sites detected in globus pallidus and substantia nigra of 5-HT(1A/1B) knockout mice were displaced by N-[3-(2-dimethylamino)ethoxy-4-methoxy-phenyl]-2'-methyl-4'- (5-methyl-1,2,4-oxadiazol-3-yl)-(1,1'-biphenyl)-4-carboxamide hydrochloride (SB-216641) (1 microM), demonstrating the 5-HT(1D) nature of these binding sites. In contrast to the low densities of [(3)H]5-CT binding sites, high-to-moderate densities of [(3)H]8-OH-DPAT binding sites (10 nM) were found throughout the brain of 5-HT(1A) and 5-HT(1A/1B) knockout mice (olfactory system, septum, thalamus, hypothalamus, amygdala, CA3 field of the hippocampus, cortical mantle, and central gray). These [(3)H]8-OH-DPAT binding sites were displaced by 10 microM SB-269970, risperidone, and methiothepin but not by pindolol, N-tert-butyl-3-[4-(2-methoxyphenyl)piperazin-1-yl]-2-phenylpropanamide (WAY- 100135), or citalopram. We conclude that despite its high affinity for the 5-HT(7) receptor in tissue homogenates, [(3)H]5-CT is not a good tracer for measuring 5-HT(7) receptor binding sites autoradiographically. Also, the lower affinity ligand [(3)H]8-OH-DPAT is a much better tracer for autoradiographic studies at the 5-HT(7) receptor binding sites.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1124/jpet.302.1.240DOI Listing
July 2002