Publications by authors named "Wenqing Feng"

5 Publications

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High versus low ligation of the inferior mesenteric artery during laparoscopic rectal cancer surgery: A prospective study of surgical and oncological outcomes.

J Surg Oncol 2021 Mar 2. Epub 2021 Mar 2.

Department of General Surgery, Ruijin Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai, China.

Background And Objectives: There is controversy regarding whether the inferior mesenteric artery (IMA) should be ligated at its origin from the aorta (high ligation, HL) or below the branch of the left colic artery (low ligation, LL) during surgery for rectal cancer.

Methods: This prospective study randomized 95 patients with histologically proven rectal cancer (clinical stages I-III based on the 8th American Joint Committee on Cancer guidelines) to undergo HL (n = 47) or LL with lymph node dissection at the root of the IMA (n = 48).

Results: Only two intraoperative adverse events were observed (two HL patients experienced anastomotic ischemia and underwent extended bowel excision and splenic flexure mobilization). The LL group had a significantly shorter time to first flatus (p < .0001). No significant differences were observed in operative time (p = .14), intraoperative blood loss (p = .21), distance from the upper margin (p = .77), distance from the lower margin (p = .35), harvested lymph nodes (p = .33), or anastomotic leakage (p = .44), 2-year overall survival (p = .97), or 2-year disease-free survival (p = .42).

Conclusion: During laparoscopic low anterior resection, a combination of LL at the IMA and vascular root lymph node dissection may help protect the blood supply of the anastomosis, reduce postoperative complications, and enhance recovery, without compromising radical excision.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jso.26362DOI Listing
March 2021

CCL19 suppresses angiogenesis through promoting miR-206 and inhibiting Met/ERK/Elk-1/HIF-1α/VEGF-A pathway in colorectal cancer.

Cell Death Dis 2018 09 24;9(10):974. Epub 2018 Sep 24.

Shanghai Minimally Invasive Surgery Center, Ruijin Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine, Shanghai, PR China.

The mechanisms underlying the role of chemokines in tumor angiogenesis is still not fully understood. In this study, we detected the influence of CCL19 on colorectal cancer (CRC) angiogenesis. The expression of CCL19 and CD31 in CRC tissues were detected by immunohistochemistry. Human CRC cell lines SW1116 and SW620 stably transfected with CCL19 lentivirus and CCL19 shRNA, and HUVEC stably transfected with CCR7 shRNA were used in our study. Our study showed that CCL19 was significantly low-expressed in CRC tissues and positively related to highly tumor microvessel density. In vitro, we observed that CCL19 high-expressed SW1116 supernatant was able to inhibit proliferation, migration, and sprouting responses of HUVEC, whereas CCL19 low-expressed SW620 supernatant can promote HUVEC angiogenesis. Additionally, we further demonstrated that these functions maybe achieved through promoting miR-206 thus inhibiting Met/ERK/Elk-1/HIF-1α/VEGF-A pathway in a CCR7-dependent manner. Mice angiogenesis model also confirmed that elevated expression of CCL19 inhibit the angiogenesis of CRC in vivo. In summary, our results supported that CCL19 can inhibit CRC angiogenesis through promoting miR-206 thus inhibiting Met/ERK/Elk-1/HIF-1α/VEGF-A pathway. This may be a novel therapeutic option for anti-vascular treatment in CRC.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41419-018-1010-2DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6155262PMC
September 2018

Characterization of an unusual ring-contraction degradant of the antifungal agent posaconazole.

Magn Reson Chem 2012 Aug 19;50(8):576-9. Epub 2012 Jun 19.

Posaconazole, a clinically useful antifungal agent, has several known oxidative degradation products involving the piperazine ring near the center of the molecule. A novel degradant was recently isolated and characterized spectroscopically as a novel ring-contraction product incorporating a dihydroimidazolium moiety in lieu of the normally present piperazine ring.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/mrc.3835DOI Listing
August 2012

Identification of unstable metabolites of Lonafarnib using liquid chromatography-quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry, stable isotope incorporation and ion source temperature alteration.

J Mass Spectrom 2006 Nov;41(11):1430-41

Department of Drug Metabolism and Pharmacokinetics, Schering-Plough Research Institute, 2015 Galloping Hill Road, Kenilworth, NJ 07033, USA.

Structural characterization of unstable metabolites and other drug-derived entities poses a serious challenge to the analytical chemist using instrumentation such as LC-MS and LC-MS/MS, and may lead to inaccurate identification of metabolite structures. The task of structural elucidation becomes even more difficult when an analyte is unstable in the ion source of the mass spectrometer. However, a judicious selection of the experimental conditions and the advanced features of new generation mass spectrometers can often overcome these difficulties. We describe here the identification of three drug-derived peaks (A, B and C) that were detected from a Schering-Plough developmental compound (Lonafarnib) following incubation with cDNA-expressed human CYP3A4. Definitive characterization was achieved using (1) accurate mass measurement, (2) stable isotope incorporation, (3) reduced ion source temperature, (4) alkali ion attachment and (5) MS/MS fragmentation studies. The protonated ions of compounds A and B fragmented almost completely in the source, yielding ions of the same mass-to-charge ratio (m/z) as that of protonated C (CH+). Fortunately, the presence of Na+ and K+ adducts of A and B provided information crucial to distinguishing AH+ and BH+ from their fragment ions. Metabolite A was shown to be an unstable hydroxylated metabolite of Lonafarnib. The metabolite C was shown to be a dehydrogenated metabolite of Lonafarnib (Lonafarnib-2H), unstable in the presence of protic solvents. Finally, B was artifactually formed most likely from C by the solvolytic addition of methanol during sample preparation. MS/MS fragmentation experiments assisted in identifying the site of metabolism in A and chemical modification in B. A and C readily interconvert through hydration/dehydration, and B and C through addition/elimination of methanol present in the sample-processing solvents. Finally, NMR experiments were performed to confirm the structures of A and C.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jms.1114DOI Listing
November 2006

Quantitative and structural determination of pseudoephedrine sulfate and its related compounds in pharmaceutical preparations using high-performance liquid chromatography.

J Pharm Biomed Anal 2002 Nov;30(4):1143-55

Analytical Development, Schering Plough Research Institute, 2011 Galloping Hill Road, 07033, Kenilworth, NJ, USA.

A simple isocratic reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatograghic method for the separation of pseudoephedrine and its related compounds in pharmaceutical formulations is described. The separation is achieved in less than 35 min on a C-18 column (4.6 mm I.D. x 25 cm length, 5-micrometer particle size) using a mobile phase consisting of a mixture of ammonium acetate and methanol. The results described in this report demonstrate that the method is sensitive and selective. Structural elucidation of two new pseudoephedrine degradation products is described. On the basis of structural analysis by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) and liquid chromatography-nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (LC-NMR), the two newly elucidated degradation products were identified to be 2-(carboxyamino)propiophenone (molecular ion of m/z=194) and 2-formyl-2-(methylamino)-acetophenone (molecular ion of m/z=178).
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/s0731-7085(02)00418-1DOI Listing
November 2002