Publications by authors named "Wenhan Deng"

6 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Variable Responses of MYC Translocation Positive Lymphoma Cell Lines To Different Combinations of Novel Agents: Impact of BCL2 Family Protein Expression.

Transl Oncol 2018 Oct 25;11(5):1147-1154. Epub 2018 Jul 25.

Division of Cellular and Molecular Pathology, Department of Pathology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK; Molecular Malignancy Laboratory, Haematopathology and Oncology Diagnostic Service, Cambridge University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Cambridge, UK. Electronic address:

Several newly developed drugs including JQ1 (BET inhibitor), ABT199 (BCL2 inhibitor), and bortezomib (proteasome inhibitor) may offer novel therapeutic strategies for aggressive diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL). We tested these drugs together with doxorubicin in a series of combinations in 16 DLBCL cell lines including 4 ABC-DLBCL (OCI-Ly3, OCI-Ly10, SUDHL2, RIVA) and 12 GCB-DLBCL lines (OCI-Ly4, OCI-Ly18, BJAB, SUDHL4, SUDHL6, SUDHL10, DB, PR1, VAL, SC1, Karpas-231, Karpas-422). Among these cell lines, ABT199 and doxorubicin, and to a lesser extent JQ1 and bortezomib, showed high variations in their ED50 values. Of the six cell lines showing high ABT199 ED50 values, four (SUDHL10, OCI-Ly4, SUDHL2, and BJAB) had no or little BCL2 expression, and SUDHL6 also displayed a low BCL2 expression. There was no association between the ED50 value of doxorubicin, JQ1 and bortezomib, and TP53/MYC/BCL2 genetic abnormalities or cell of origin subtype. A synergistic effect in all or the majority of drug combinations was seen in 11 cell lines, while an antagonistic effect in a high proportion of drug combinations was observed in the remaining 5 cell lines including the 3 (SUDHL10, OCI-Ly4, and SUDHL2) with little BCL2 expression, and additionally OCI-Ly18 and RIVA. Extensive Western blot analyses revealed high MCL1 expression in SUDHL10 and OCI-Ly4 but no apparent alterations in other cell lines. The molecular mechanism underlying the antagonistic effect of drug combinations in DLBCL is heterogeneous with the altered BCL2 family protein expression (absent BCL2, but high MCL1) in some cell lines.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.tranon.2018.07.007DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6077152PMC
October 2018

DYNC1H1 mutation alters transport kinetics and ERK1/2-cFos signalling in a mouse model of distal spinal muscular atrophy.

Brain 2014 Jul 22;137(Pt 7):1883-93. Epub 2014 Apr 22.

1 School of Life Sciences, University of Sussex, Falmer, Brighton, BN1 9QG, UK

Mutations in the gene encoding the heavy chain subunit (DYNC1H1) of cytoplasmic dynein cause spinal muscular atrophy with lower extremity predominance, Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease and intellectual disability. We used the legs at odd angles (Loa) (DYNC1H1(F580Y)) mouse model for spinal muscular atrophy with lower extremity predominance and a combination of live-cell imaging and biochemical assays to show that the velocity of dynein-dependent microtubule minus-end (towards the nucleus) movement of EGF and BDNF induced signalling endosomes is significantly reduced in Loa embryonic fibroblasts and motor neurons. At the same time, the number of the plus-end (towards the cell periphery) moving endosomes is increased in the mutant cells. As a result, the extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK) 1/2 activation and c-Fos expression are altered in both mutant cell types, but the motor neurons exhibit a strikingly abnormal ERK1/2 and c-Fos response to serum-starvation induced stress. These data highlight the cell-type specific ERK1/2 response as a possible contributory factor in the neuropathological nature of Dync1h1 mutations, despite generic aberrant kinetics in both cell types, providing an explanation for how mutations in the ubiquitously expressed DYNC1H1 cause neuron-specific disease.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/brain/awu097DOI Listing
July 2014

Neurodegenerative mutation in cytoplasmic dynein alters its organization and dynein-dynactin and dynein-kinesin interactions.

J Biol Chem 2010 Dec 2;285(51):39922-34. Epub 2010 Oct 2.

From School of Life Sciences, University of Sussex, Brighton BN1 9QG, United Kingdom.

A single amino acid change, F580Y (Legs at odd angles (Loa), Dync1h1(Loa)), in the highly conserved and overlapping homodimerization, intermediate chain, and light intermediate chain binding domain of the cytoplasmic dynein heavy chain can cause severe motor and sensory neuron loss in mice. The mechanism by which the Loa mutation impairs the neuron-specific functions of dynein is not understood. To elucidate the underlying molecular mechanisms of neurodegeneration arising from this mutation, we applied a cohort of biochemical methods combined with in vivo assays to systemically study the effects of the mutation on the assembly of dynein and its interaction with dynactin. We found that the Loa mutation in the heavy chain leads to increased affinity of this subunit of cytoplasmic dynein to light intermediate and a population of intermediate chains and a suppressed association of dynactin to dynein. These data suggest that the Loa mutation drives the assembly of cytoplasmic dynein toward a complex with lower affinity to dynactin and thus impairing transport of cargos that tether to the complex via dynactin. In addition, we detected up-regulation of kinesin light chain 1 (KLC1) and its increased association with dynein but reduced microtubule-associated KLC1 in the Loa samples. We provide a model describing how up-regulation of KLC1 and its interaction with cytoplasmic dynein in Loa could play a regulatory role in restoring the retrograde and anterograde transport in the Loa neurons.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1074/jbc.M110.178087DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3000974PMC
December 2010

Mouse cytoplasmic dynein intermediate chains: identification of new isoforms, alternative splicing and tissue distribution of transcripts.

PLoS One 2010 Jul 21;5(7):e11682. Epub 2010 Jul 21.

Department of Neurodegenerative Disease, UCL Institute of Neurology, London, United Kingdom.

Background: Intracellular transport of cargoes including organelles, vesicles, signalling molecules, protein complexes, and RNAs, is essential for normal function of eukaryotic cells. The cytoplasmic dynein complex is an important motor that moves cargos along microtubule tracks within the cell. In mammals this multiprotein complex includes dynein intermediate chains 1 and 2 which are encoded by two genes, Dync1i1 and Dync1i2. These proteins are involved in dynein cargo binding and dynein complexes with different intermediate chains bind to specific cargoes, although the mechanisms to achieve this are not known. The DYNC1I1 and DYNC1I2 proteins are translated from different splice isoforms, and specific forms of each protein are essential for the function of different dynein complexes in neurons.

Methodology/principal Findings: Here we have undertaken a systematic survey of the dynein intermediate chain splice isoforms in mouse, basing our study on mRNA expression patterns in a range of tissues, and on bioinformatics analysis of mouse, rat and human genomic and cDNA sequences. We found a complex pattern of alternative splicing of both dynein intermediate chain genes, with maximum complexity in the embryonic and adult nervous system. We have found novel transcripts, including some with orthologues in human and rat, and a new promoter and alternative non-coding exon 1 for Dync1i2.

Conclusions/significance: These data, including the cloned isoforms will be essential for understanding the role of intermediate chains in the cytoplasmic dynein complex, particularly their role in cargo binding within individual tissues including different brain regions.
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http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0011682PLOS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2908135PMC
July 2010

The legs at odd angles (Loa) mutation in cytoplasmic dynein ameliorates mitochondrial function in SOD1G93A mouse model for motor neuron disease.

J Biol Chem 2010 Jun 9;285(24):18627-39. Epub 2010 Apr 9.

Biochemistry and Biomedical Science, School of Life Sciences, University of Sussex, Brighton BN1 9QG, United Kingdom.

Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a debilitating and fatal late-onset neurodegenerative disease. Familial cases of ALS (FALS) constitute approximately 10% of all ALS cases, and mutant superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) is found in 15-20% of FALS. SOD1 mutations confer a toxic gain of unknown function to the protein that specifically targets the motor neurons in the cortex and the spinal cord. We have previously shown that the autosomal dominant Legs at odd angles (Loa) mutation in cytoplasmic dynein heavy chain (Dync1h1) delays disease onset and extends the life span of transgenic mice harboring human mutant SOD1(G93A). In this study we provide evidence that despite the lack of direct interactions between mutant SOD1 and either mutant or wild-type cytoplasmic dynein, the Loa mutation confers significant reductions in the amount of mutant SOD1 protein in the mitochondrial matrix. Moreover, we show that the Loa mutation ameliorates defects in mitochondrial respiration and membrane potential observed in SOD1(G93A) motor neuron mitochondria. These data suggest that the Loa mutation reduces the vulnerability of mitochondria to the toxic effects of mutant SOD1, leading to improved mitochondrial function in SOD1(G93A) motor neurons.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1074/jbc.M110.129320DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2881788PMC
June 2010

Purification, N-terminal sequencing, crystallization and preliminary structural determination of atratoxin-b, a short-chain alpha-neurotoxin from Naja atra venom.

Acta Crystallogr D Biol Crystallogr 2003 Jun 23;59(Pt 6):1038-42. Epub 2003 May 23.

Key Laboratory of Structural Biology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, University of Science and Technology of China, 96 Jinzhai Road, Hefei, Anhui 230026, People's Republic of China.

Atratoxin-b, a short-chain alpha-neurotoxin purified from Naja atra (mainland Chinese cobra) venom using a three-step chromatography procedure, has an apparent molecular mass of 6950 Da with an alkaline pI value (>9.5) and consists of one single polypeptide chain as estimated by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry and SDS-PAGE. The protein is toxic to mice, with an in vitro LD(50) of about 0.18 mg kg(-1). Its N-terminal amino-acid sequence, LECHNQQSSQTPTIT, displays a very high homology to those of other alpha-neurotoxins. The overall three-dimensional structure of atratoxin-b is very similar to that of the homologous erabutoxin-a, as shown by the crystallographic molecular replacement and preliminary refinement results, with an R factor and R(free) of 27 and 29%, respectively. The microcrystal slowly grew to dimensions of approximate 0.1 x 0.1 x 0.15 mm over eight months using hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. It gave a set of diffraction data to 1.56 A resolution using X-rays of wavelength 1.1516 A generated by the X-ray Diffraction and Scattering Station of beamline U7B at the National Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (Hefei, China); this is the first example of the use of this beamline in protein crystallography. The crystals belong to the tetragonal space group P4(1)2(1)2, with unit-cell parameters a = 49.28, c = 44.80 A, corresponding to one molecule per asymmetric unit and a volume-to-mass ratio of 1.96 A(3) Da(-1).
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1107/s0907444903005687DOI Listing
June 2003