Publications by authors named "Wendy Hodsdon"

5 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Effect Of Leaf Extract On Platelet Count In Chronic Immune Thrombocytopenic Purpura: A Case Series.

Integr Med (Encinitas) 2019 Oct;18(5):30-35

Kalispell Regional Medical Center, Kalispell, Montana, USA.

The leaves of have been used to treat thrombocytopenia in Dengue fever in areas where the virus is endemic. This case series describes the use of leaf liquid extract (CPLE) as an adjunctive therapy for four patients receiving standard-of-care treatment for chronic immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP). The cases presented here indicate that CPLE may prove beneficial in the management of chronic ITP for patients interested in alternative therapy before progressing to second-line treatments. A larger clinical trial is warranted to evaluate CPLE as an adjunctive therapy in chronic ITP.
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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7219447PMC
October 2019

Naturopathic Oncology Modified Delphi Panel.

Integr Cancer Ther 2016 Mar 24;15(1):69-79. Epub 2015 Jul 24.

Helfgott Research Institute, National College of Natural Medicine, Portland, OR, USA.

Unlabelled: Naturopathic oncology is a relatively new and emerging field capable of providing professional integrative or alternative services to cancer patients. Foundational research is critical to identify topics in the clinical and research development of naturopathic oncology for future growth of the field.

Study Design: This study implements a modified Delphi protocol to develop expert consensus regarding ethics, philosophy, and research development in naturopathic oncology.

Methods: The modified protocol implements a nomination process to select a panel of 8 physicians and to assist in question formulation. The protocol includes an in-person discussion of 6 questions with multiple iterations to maintain the concept of the Delphi methodology as well as a postdiscussion consensus survey.

Results: The protocol identified, ranked, and established consensus for numerous themes per question. Underlying key topics include integration with conventional medicine, evidence-based medicine, patient education, patient safety, and additional training requirements for naturopathic oncologists.

Conclusions: The systematic nomination and questioning of a panel of experts provides a foundational and educational resource to assist in clarification of clinical ethics, philosophy, and research development in the emerging field of naturopathic oncology.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1534735415589983DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5736075PMC
March 2016

In utero exposure and breast cancer development: an epigenetic perspective.

J Environ Pathol Toxicol Oncol 2014 ;33(3):239-45

Helfgott Research Institute, National College of Natural Medicine, Portland, Oregon.

The ubiquitous and detrimental disease of breast cancer requires continual research into new and alternative forms of treatment and prevention. The emerging field of epigenetics is beginning to unfold an array of contemporary approaches to reduce the risk and improve the clinical approach to breast cancer. The information contained in this non-systematic review highlights and expands on the estrogen-based model of breast cancer epigenetics to provide an overview of epigenetic alterations induced by nutrition and environmental exposure. The majority of evidence suggests that various sources of excess estrogen correlate to future breast cancer development. In addition, maternal macro- and micronutrient balance appear to play a role in genomic regulation, and preliminary data suggest that specific superfoods, such as blueberries, have a protective epigenetic effect. Identifying the influence of environmental toxicants, hormonal exposure, maternal nutrition, and maternal disease on fetal epigenetics may have potential for development of new therapeutic approaches for the prevention of breast cancer.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1615/jenvironpatholtoxicoloncol.2014011005DOI Listing
November 2014

Identification of an Sp factor-dependent promoter in GCET, a gene expressed at high levels in germinal center B cells.

Mol Immunol 2004 Nov;41(12):1145-53

Allergy Division, University of Virginia Health Sciences Center, Charlottesville, VA 22908, USA.

Antigen-stimulated B lymphocytes undergo genetic and phenotypic changes in germinal centers (GCs), including affinity maturation of immunoglobulin (Ig) genes and Ig heavy chain isotype switching. Expression of the Germinal Center Expressed Transcript (GCET) gene is up-regulated in murine GC B cells. The human homolog of GCET, HGAL/GCET2, is an important prognostic marker for staging lymphomas derived from GCs. To identify mechanisms that control cell type-specific transcription of GCET, we localized promoter sequences using S1 nuclease protection and functional assays. Sequences comprising a TATA-less promoter were localized to a short region upstream of multiple mRNA start sites. In functional assays, the promoter is active in cells irrespectively of endogenous GCET gene expression. In vitro binding assays identified a non-consensus binding site for Sp factors near sites of transcriptional initiation. The site binds Spl and Sp3 in nuclear extracts and recombinant Spl in vitro, and is required for full promoter function in transient promoter assays. Activation of the promoter by Spl or Sp3 in Spl/3-deficient cells was largely dependent on the Sp site. Together, these data provide the first analysis of regulatory modules necessary for GCET expression, a model for GC B cell-specific transcription.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.molimm.2004.06.031DOI Listing
November 2004

Cytokine responses and progression to active tuberculosis in HIV-1-infected Ugandans: a prospective study.

Trans R Soc Trop Med Hyg 2004 Nov;98(11):660-70

Uganda Virus Research Institute, P.O. Box 49, Entebbe, Uganda.

Identifying correlates of immunity or susceptibility to disease promotes understanding of pathogenesis and development of diagnostic tools, treatments, and vaccines. There is evidence that type 1 cytokine responses are associated with protection against tuberculosis, and suppression of type 1, or switching to type 2 responses, with susceptibility, but this has not been studied prospectively. We studied a cohort of 631 HIV-1-infected Ugandan adults. At enrollment we performed whole blood cultures for type 1 (interferon [IFN]-gamma, interleukin [IL]-2) and type 2/immunosuppressive (IL-5, IL-10) responses to mycobacterial antigens (purified protein derivative [PPD] and culture filtrate proteins [CFP]). The incidence of tuberculosis was not associated with IFN-gamma responses, but was higher among participants with IL-2 responses (adjusted rate ratios [RR]: PPD 3.48; CFP 3.99; P < 0.001). For tuberculin skin test-positive participants, high incidence was also associated with an IL-10 response to PPD (adjusted RR 6.24, P = 0.03); for those with a BCG scar, high incidence was associated with positive IL-5 responses (adjusted RRs: PPD 3.64, P = 0.006; CFP 3.44, P = 0.04). The association with IL-2 production may reflect a response to tuberculous infection or to activating disease; the associations with IL-10 and IL-5 are in keeping with the expected role of immunosuppressive or type 2 cytokines.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.trstmh.2004.01.007DOI Listing
November 2004
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