Publications by authors named "Watcharapong Fahkrajang"

4 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Bovine respiratory coronavirus enhances bacterial adherence by upregulating expression of cellular receptors on bovine respiratory epithelial cells.

Vet Microbiol 2021 Apr 17;255:109017. Epub 2021 Feb 17.

Department of Veterinary Science, Faculty of Agriculture, University of Miyazaki, Miyazaki, 889-2192, Japan; Graduate School of Medicine and Veterinary Medicine, University of Miyazaki, Miyazaki, 889-2192, Japan; Center for Animal Disease Control, University of Miyazaki, Miyazaki, 889-2192, Japan. Electronic address:

Bovine coronavirus (BCoV) is one of the agents causing bovine respiratory disease complex (BRDC), with single infection tending to be mild to moderate; the probability of developing pneumonia in BRDC may be affected by viral and bacterial combinations. Previously, we reported that bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV) infection enhances adherence of Pasteurella multocida (PM) to cells derived from the bovine lower respiratory tract but that BRSV infection in cells derived from the upper respiratory tract reduces PM adherence. In this study, we sought to clarify whether the modulation of bacterial adherence to cells derived from the bovine upper and lower respiratory tract is shared by other BRDC-related viruses by infecting bovine epithelial cells from the trachea, bronchus and lung with BCoV and/or PM. The results showed that cells derived from both the upper and lower respiratory tract were susceptible to BCoV infection. Furthermore, all cells infected with BCoV exhibited increased PM adherence via upregulation of two major bacterial adhesion molecules, intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) and platelet-activating factor receptor (PAF-R), suggesting that compared with BRSV infection, BCoV infection differentially modulates bacterial adherence. In summary, we identified distinct interaction between bovine respiratory viruses and bacterial infections.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.vetmic.2021.109017DOI Listing
April 2021

Evaluating the Risk Factors for Infection in an Endemic Area of Vietnam.

Front Vet Sci 2020 29;7:433. Epub 2020 Jul 29.

Center for Animal Disease Control, University of Miyazaki, Miyazaki, Japan.

(PEDV) causes enteritis, vomiting, watery diarrhea, and high mortality in suckling pigs, threatening the swine industry. Porcine epidemic diarrhea (PED) re-emerged globally in 2013 in many important swine-producing countries in Asia and the Americas. Several studies have identified the risk factors for the spread of PEDV in acute outbreaks. However, limited information is available on the risk factors for the transmission of PEDV in endemic regions. We hypothesized that poor biosecurity, location, and some social or cultural practices are the main risk factors for PEDV transmission in the Vietnamese pig population. The aim of this study was to evaluate the potential risk factors for the transmission of PEDV in an endemic area in Vietnam. In this case-control study, questionnaires containing 51 questions were completed for 92 PEDV-positive and 95 PEDV-negative farms. A logistic regression analysis was performed to assess the risk factors associated with PEDV infection. Province and the total number of pigs were included as random effects to determine their influence on the risk of PEDV infection. Twenty-nine variables of interest that have been associated with PEDV status were analyzed in a univariate analysis ( <0.20), with backward stepwise selection. Only three of these 29 variables in four models remained significant PEDV risk factors in the final model: farrow-to-wean production type, distance from the farm to the slaughterhouse (<1,000 m), and the presence of chickens on site ( <0.05). This is the first study to identify the main risk factors for PEDV infection in an endemic area. Our findings suggest that hygiene measures should be strictly implemented on farms for the effective control and prevention of PEDV infection.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fvets.2020.00433DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7403480PMC
July 2020

Bovine Respiratory Syncytial Virus Enhances the Adherence of to Bovine Lower Respiratory Tract Epithelial Cells by Upregulating the Platelet-Activating Factor Receptor.

Front Microbiol 2020 31;11:1676. Epub 2020 Jul 31.

Graduate School of Medicine and Veterinary Medicine, University of Miyazaki, Miyazaki, Japan.

Coinfection by bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV) and (PM) frequently has been observed in cattle that develop severe pneumonia. We recently reported that BRSV infection significantly increased PM adherence to bovine lower respiratory tract epithelial cells. However, the molecular mechanisms of enhanced PM adherence are not completely understood. To investigate whether BRSV infection regulates any cellular adherence receptors on bovine bronchus- and lung-epithelial cells, we performed proteomic and functional analyses. The proteomic analysis showed that BRSV infection increased the accumulation of the platelet-activating factor receptor (PAFR) in both cell types. Molecular experiments, including specific blockade, knockdown, and overexpression of PAFR, indicated that PM adherence to these cell types depended on PAFR expression. These findings highlight the role, in cattle with severe pneumonia, of the synergistic effect of coinfection by BRSV and PM in the lower respiratory tract.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fmicb.2020.01676DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7411089PMC
July 2020

Bovine Respiratory Syncytial Virus Decreased Pasteurella multocida Adherence by Downregulating the Expression of Intercellular Adhesion Molecule-1 on the Surface of Upper Respiratory Epithelial Cells.

Vet Microbiol 2020 Jul 2;246:108748. Epub 2020 Jun 2.

Graduate School of Medicine and Veterinary Medicine, University of Miyazaki, Miyazaki, Japan; Department of Veterinary Science, Faculty of Agriculture, University of Miyazaki, Miyazaki, Japan; Center for Animal Disease Control, University of Miyazaki, Miyazaki, Japan. Electronic address:

The synergistic infection of bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV) and Pasteurella multocida (PM) may predispose cattle to develop severe pneumonia. Previously, we reported that BRSV infection significantly decreased PM adherence to the upper respiratory epithelial cells. It may allow bacteria to invade into the lower respiratory tract and lead to severe pneumonia. To investigate whether BRSV infection regulates the cell surface adherence receptor on bovine trachea epithelial cells (bTECs), we performed proteomic and functional analyses. BRSV infection decreased the expression of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM1) on bTECs. Inhibition and knockdown experiments using anti-ICAM1 antibody and siRNAs targeting ICAM1 indicated that PM adherence to bTECs was dependent on ICAM1 expression. These data suggest that under normal conditions bTECs may capture PM in the upper respiratory tract, while BRSV infection reverses this mechanism. The proposed gateway function of bTECs is disrupted by BRSV infection that may facilitate bacterial invasion into the lower respiratory tract and lead to secondary or more severe respiratory infection.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.vetmic.2020.108748DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7265823PMC
July 2020