Publications by authors named "Wanwisa Srinuanchai"

9 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Development of Chrysin Loaded Oil-in-Water Nanoemulsion for Improving Bioaccessibility.

Foods 2021 Aug 18;10(8). Epub 2021 Aug 18.

Nano Agricultural Chemistry and Processing Research Team, National Nanotechnology Center (NANOTEC), National Science and Technology Development Agency (NSTDA), Klong Luang, Pathum Thani 12120, Thailand.

Chrysin (5,7-dihydroxyflavone) is a remarkable flavonoid exhibiting many health-promoting activities, such as antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and anti-Alzheimer's disease (AD). Nevertheless, chrysin has been addressed regarding its limited applications, due to low bioaccessibility. Therefore, to improve chrysin bioaccessibility, a colloidal delivery system involving nanoemulsion was developed as chrysin nanoemulsion (chrysin-NE) using an oil-in-water system. Our results show that chrysin can be loaded by approximately 174.21 µg/g nanoemulsion (100.29 ± 0.53% ) when medium chain triglyceride (MCT) oil was used as an oil phase. The nanocolloidal size, polydispersity index, and surface charge of chrysin-NE were approximately 161 nm, 0.21, and -32 mV, respectively. These properties were stable for at least five weeks at room temperature. Furthermore, in vitro chrysin bioactivities regarding antioxidant and anti-AD were maintained as pure chrysin, suggesting that multistep formulation could not affect chrysin properties. Interestingly, the developed chrysin-NE was more tolerant of gastrointestinal digestion and significantly absorbed by the human intestinal cells (Caco-2) than pure chrysin. These findings demonstrate that the encapsulation of chrysin using oil-in-water nanoemulsion could enhance the bioaccessibility of chrysin, which might be subsequently applied to food and nutraceutical industries.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/foods10081912DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8392734PMC
August 2021

Tandem mass spectrometry of aqueous extract from Ficus dubia sap and its cell-based assessments for use as a skin antioxidant.

Sci Rep 2021 08 19;11(1):16899. Epub 2021 Aug 19.

Nano Agricultural Chemistry and Processing Research Team, National Nanotechnology Center (NANOTEC), National Science and Technology Development Agency (NSTDA), Pathumthani, Thailand.

Since 2006, Ficus dubia has been reported as a new Ficus species in Thailand. As per our recent report, the red-brown aqueous extract of F. dubia sap (FDS) has been determined to strongly exhibit in vitro anti-radicals. However, the phytochemicals in the FDS extract related to health-promoting antioxidation have not been explored. Thus, in this study, we aimed to investigate the chemical components of the F. dubia sap extract by liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LC-ESI-MS/QTOF-MS) and its potential use in cosmetics in terms of cellular antioxidation on keratinocytes (HaCaT), phototoxicity, and irritation on 3D skin cell models following standard tests suggested by the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD). It was found that the sap extract was composed of quinic acid and caffeoyl derivatives (e.g., syringoylquinic acid, 3-O-caffeoylquinic acid, 4-O-caffeoylquinic acid, and dimeric forms of caffeoylquinic acids). The extract has significantly exhibited antioxidant activity against HO-induced oxidative stress in HaCaT cells. The cellular antioxidative effect of the FDS extract was remarkably dependent on the presence of 3- and 4-O-caffeoylquinic acid in the extract. Furthermore, the FDS extract showed negative results on skin phototoxicity and irritation. Overall, the results reveal that the FDS extract could be developed as a new antioxidant candidate for a skin healthcare product.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41598-021-96261-3DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8377047PMC
August 2021

Inhibitory effects of Gymnema inodorum (Lour.) Decne leaf extracts and its triterpene saponin on carbohydrate digestion and intestinal glucose absorption.

J Ethnopharmacol 2021 Feb 21;266:113398. Epub 2020 Sep 21.

National Nanotechnology Center (NANOTEC), National Science and Technology Development Agency (NSTDA), Pathum Thani, Thailand. Electronic address:

Ethnopharmacological Relevance: Chiang-Da, Gymnema inodorum (Lour.) Decne. (GI), is an ethnomedicinal plant that has been used for diabetic treatment since ancient times. One of the anti-diabetic mechanisms is possibly related to the actions of triterpene glycoside, (3β, 16β)-16,28-dihydroxyolean-12-en-3-yl-O-β-D-glucopyranosyl-β-D-glucopyranosiduronic acid (GIA1) in decreasing carbohydrate digestive enzymes and intestinal glucose absorption in the gut system.

Aims Of The Study: To observe the amount of GIA1 in GI leaf extracts obtained from different ethanol concentrations and to investigate the anti-hyperglycemic mechanisms of the extracts and GIA1.

Materials And Methods: The crude extracts were prepared using 50%v/v to 95%v/v ethanol solutions and used for GIA1 isolation. The anti-hyperglycemic models included in our study examined the inhibitory activities of α-amylase/α-glucosidase and intestinal glucose absorption related to sodium glucose cotransporter type 1 (SGLT1) using Caco-2 cells.

Results: GIA1 was found about 8%w/w to 18%w/w in the GI extract depending on ethanol concentrations. The GI extracts and GIA1 showed less inhibitory activities on α-amylase. The extracts from 75%v/v and 95%v/v ethanol and GIA1 significantly delayed the glycemic absorption by lowering α-glucosidase activity and glucose transportation of SGLT1. However, the 50%v/v ethanolic extract markedly decreased the α-glucosidase activity than the SGLT1 function.

Conclusion: Differences in the GIA1 contents and anti-glycemic properties of the GI leaf extract was dependent on ethanol concentrations. Furthermore, the inhibitory effects of the 75%v/v and 95%v/v ethanolic extracts on α-glucosidase and SGLT1 were relevant to GIA1 content.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jep.2020.113398DOI Listing
February 2021

The Effect of Sacred Lotus () and Its Mixtures on Phenolic Profiles, Antioxidant Activities, and Inhibitions of the Key Enzymes Relevant to Alzheimer's Disease.

Molecules 2020 Aug 14;25(16). Epub 2020 Aug 14.

Institute of Nutrition, Mahidol University, Salaya, Phuttamonthon, Nakhon Pathom 73170, Thailand.

Sacred lotus () has long been used as a food source and ingredient for traditional herbal remedies. Plant parts contain neuroprotective agents that interact with specific targets to inhibit Alzheimer's disease (AD). Organic solvents including methanol, ethyl acetate, hexane, and -butanol, are widely employed for extraction of sacred lotus but impact food safety. Seed embryo, flower stalk, stamen, old leaf, petal, and leaf stalk of sacred lotus were extracted using hot water (aqueous extraction). The extractions were analyzed for their bioactive constituents, antioxidant and anti-AD properties as key enzyme inhibitory activities toward acetylcholinesterase (AChE), butyrylcholinesterase (BChE), and β-secretase 1 (BACE-1). Results showed that the sacred lotus stamen exhibited significant amounts of phenolics, including phenolic acids and flavonoids, that contributed to high antioxidant activity via both single electron transfer (SET) and hydrogen atom transfer (HAT) mechanisms, with anti-AChE, anti-BChE, and anti-BACE-1 activities. To enhance utilization of other sacred lotus parts, a combination of stamen, old leaf and petal as the three sacred lotus plant components with the highest phenolic contents, antioxidant activities, and enzyme inhibitory properties was analyzed. Antagonist interaction was observed, possibly from flavonoids-flavonoids interaction. Further in-depth elucidation of this issue is required. Findings demonstrated that an aqueous extract of the stamen has potential for application as a functional food to mitigate the onset of Alzheimer's disease.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/molecules25163713DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7463813PMC
August 2020

Synthesis and anticervical cancer activity of novel pH responsive micelles for oral curcumin delivery.

Int J Pharm 2014 Dec 18;477(1-2):261-72. Epub 2014 Oct 18.

Department of Manufacturing Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Mahidol University, Bangkok 10400, Thailand; Center of Excellence in Innovative Drug Delivery and Nanomedicine, Faculty of Pharmacy, Mahidol University, Bangkok 10400, Thailand.

Curcumin (CM) has demonstrated safety and efficacy as a drug, but its pharmaceutical role is restricted as a result of extremely low aqueous solubility, rapid systemic elimination, inadequate tissue absorption and degradation at alkaline pH; properties that severely curtail its bioavailability. To address this issue, CM was encapsulated within pH responsive amphiphilic chitosan, resulting in the formation of 100 nm spontaneously self-assembled polymeric micelles in water. The amphiphilic chitosan, namely N-benzyl-N,O-succinyl chitosan (BSCS), was prepared by reductive N-benzylation and N,O-succinylation. The stability of micelles after being re-dispersed in water was investigated using glycine as a cryoprotectant, and the average sizes were shown to be maintained at a level lower than 200 nm for up to 4 months, at temperatures of 4°C and 25°C. In vitro drug release results showed that CM was slowly released from the micelles without any burst effect in the intestine (pH 5.5-7.4), with limited release in the stomach (pH 1.2). Cytotoxicity assays indicated that CM loaded micelles showed half maximal inhibitory concentrations (IC50) 4.7-, 3.6-, and 12.2-fold lower than that of free CM in HeLa, SiHa and C33a cervical cell lines, respectively. Cellular uptake of micelles was confirmed by confocal laser scanning microscopy and flow cytometry, with a 6-fold significant increase in the amount of CM loaded micelles compared to free CM in all cervical cancer cells. Notably, CM loaded micelles promoted an increase (30-55%) in the percentage of early apoptosis of HeLa, SiHa and C33a cells, compared to free CM. These results suggest that BSCS micelles may be a promising carrier for effective oral delivery of CM.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ijpharm.2014.10.042DOI Listing
December 2014

Influence of curcumin-loaded cationic liposome on anticancer activity for cervical cancer therapy.

Colloids Surf B Biointerfaces 2014 Feb 29;114:349-56. Epub 2013 Oct 29.

National Nanotechnology Center (NANOTEC), National Science and Technology Development Agency (NSTDA), Pathumthani 12120, Thailand. Electronic address:

The delivery of curcumin has been explored in the form of liposomal nanoparticles to treat various cancer cells. Since curcumin is water insoluble and an effective delivery route is through encapsulation in liposomes, which were modified with three components of DDAB, cholesterol and non-ionic surfactant. The purpose of this study was to establish a critical role of DDAB in liposomes containing curcumin at cellular response against two types of cell lines (HeLa and SiHa). Here, we demonstrate that DDAB is a potent inducer of cell uptake and cell death in both cell lines. The enhanced cell uptake was found on DDAB-containing liposome, but not on DDAB-free liposome. However, the cytotoxicity of DDAB-containing liposomes was high and needs to be optimized. The cytotoxicity of liposomal curcumin was more pronounced than free curcumin in both cells, suggesting the benefits of using nanocarrier. In addition, the anticancer efficiency and apoptosis effect of the liposomal curcumin formulations with DDAB was higher than those of DDAB-free liposomes. Therefore curcumin loaded liposomes indicate significant potential as delivery vehicles for the treatment of cervical cancers.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.colsurfb.2013.10.005DOI Listing
February 2014

Encapsulation of citral isomers in extracted lemongrass oil with cyclodextrins: molecular modeling and physicochemical characterizations.

Biosci Biotechnol Biochem 2011 7;75(12):2340-5. Epub 2011 Dec 7.

National Nanotechnology Center, National Science and Technology Development Agency, Pathumthani, Thailand.

The complexation between two isomers of citral in lemongrass oil and varying types of cyclodextrins (CDs), α-CD, β-CD, and HP-β-CD, were studied by molecular modeling and physicochemical characterization. The results obtained revealed that the most favorable complex formation governing between citrals in lemongrass oil and CDs were found at a 1:2 mole ratio for all CDs. Complex formation between E-citral and CD was more favorable than between Z-citral and CD. The thermal stability of the inclusion complex was observed compared to the citral in the lemongrass oil. The release time course of citral from the inclusion complex was the diffusion control, and it correlated well with Avrami's equation. The release rate constants of the E- and Z-citral inclusion complexes at 50 °C, 50% RH were observed at 1.32×10(-2) h(-1) and 1.43×10(-2) h(-1) respectively.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1271/bbb.110523DOI Listing
April 2012

Nondestructive rheological measurement of aqueous dispersions of solid lipid nanoparticles: effects of lipid types and concentrations on dispersion consistency.

Drug Dev Ind Pharm 2010 Sep;36(9):1005-15

National Metal and Materials Technology Center, National Science and Technology Development Agency, Pathumthani, Thailand.

Purpose: To investigate dispersion consistency of solid lipid nanoparticles as functions of lipid types and concentrations.

Methods: Viscoelastic measurement at an application of low stress was employed to characterize the internal microstructure developed within the dispersions. Pure triglycerides with different length of fatty acid chains, trimyristin (C14), tripalmitin (C16), and tristearin (C18) were studied with respect to the partial triglyceride with C22 chain length (Compritol 888 ATO), and cetyl palmitate wax (C16).

Results And Discussion: Increasing fatty acid chain length of triglycerides induced more particle shape anisometry; therefore, elastic behavior of triglyceride dispersion increased in sequence of trimyristin < tripalmitin < tristearin. Because of an imperfect crystalline structure, Compritol 888 ATO particles yielded the dispersion with a less elastic behavior. Despite having an equal fatty acid chain length (C16), cetyl palmitate wax provided the dispersion with lower network strength than tripalmitin as a result of the lower ordered crystal packing of fatty acid chains in the wax particle. Increasing lipid concentration improved the dispersion consistency owing to the more pronounced interaction between lipid particles. Data obtained from particle size analysis did not help explain the resulting microstructures in relation to the types and concentrations of lipid.

Conclusions: A nondestructive rheological experiment is a powerful tool in revealing the microscopic structures of SLNs, which provides the information on viscous and elastic behaviors, corresponding to the internal structure of the dispersions. Consequently, viscoelastic data might assist pharmaceutical industry in selecting type of lipid appropriate for developing SLN formulations with the desired consistency.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3109/03639040903586273DOI Listing
September 2010

Rheological and morphological characterizations on physical stability of gamma-oryzanol-loaded solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs).

Micron 2010 Jan 13;41(1):51-8. Epub 2009 Aug 13.

National Metal and Materials Technology Center, National Science and Technology Development Agency, 114 Thailand Science Park, Pathumthani 12120, Thailand.

In the present study, gamma-oryzanol was incorporated into glycerol behenate (Compritol 888 ATO) nanoparticles (SLNs) at 5 and 10% (w/w) of lipid phase. Increasing lipid phase concentration resulted in increased consistency and particle diameter of SLNs. Upon storage over 60 days at 4, 25 and 40 degrees C, the instability was observed by rheological analysis for all samples due to the formation of gelation. Rheological measurement revealed the increase in storage modulus and critical stress during storage at all temperatures. However, at 40 degrees C, the pronounced instability was observed from the highest increase in storage modulus and a formation of rod-like network structure from scanning electron micrographs. An increase in crystallinity, determined by differential scanning calorimetry, was also found during storage at all temperatures, confirming the instability of SLNs. Particle diameters and zeta potentials of both concentrations at all storage conditions failed to explain the observed instability. These investigations may help to develop formulations of solid lipid nanoparticles, which are optimized with respect to the desired rheological properties.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.micron.2009.08.003DOI Listing
January 2010
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