Publications by authors named "Wangyan Jiang"

3 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Bilateral breast myxedema caused by Graves' disease and responsive to multipoint subcutaneous injection of long-acting glucocorticoid: Case report.

Medicine (Baltimore) 2021 Jun;100(25):e26469

Department of Endocrinology, Tongji Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, China, Branch of National Clinical Research Center for Metabolic Disease, Hubei.

Rationale: With the absence of ophthalmopathy, thyroid dermopathy especially lesions at atypical locations is a very rare presentation. We herein report an original case of bilateral breast myxedema caused by Grave's disease.

Patient Concerns: A 21-year-old unmarried woman presented with a 4-month history of Grave's disease and a 1-month history of progressive bilateral breast enlargement. She had symmetrical bilateral breast enlargement with redness and nonpitting thickening of the skin, diffusely enlarged thyroid glands, and no exophthalmos.

Diagnosis: Ultrasonography, magnetic resonance imaging scan, and skin biopsy confirmed the diagnosis of bilateral breast myxedema.

Interventions: The patient was treated with multipoint subcutaneous injections of triamcinolone acetonide in each breast every month.

Outcomes: The bilateral breast returned approximately to its normal size after therapy for 6 months.

Conclusions: Our case illustrates that multipoint subcutaneous injection of glucocorticoids is beneficial for bilateral breast myxedema.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/MD.0000000000026469DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8238392PMC
June 2021

Different characteristics of critical COVID-19 and thinking of treatment strategies in non-elderly and elderly severe adult patients.

Int Immunopharmacol 2021 Mar 4;92:107343. Epub 2021 Jan 4.

Department of Endocrinology, Tongji Hospital, affiliated to Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, China. Electronic address:

Background: The differences in the characteristics and main causes of critical COVID-19 infection in non-elderly and elderly severe patients remain unknown.

Methods: We included 273 adult patients with confirmed severe COVID-19 from Tongji Hospital, Wuhan, China from February 10 to March 8, 2020. Clinical characteristics and risk factors for outcomes were compared between the young and middle-aged and the elderly severe patients.

Results: Hemoglobin, neutrophil percentage, inflammatory markers, hepatic, renal, and cardiovascularparameters differed between the non-elderly and elderly severe patients. In young and middle-aged patients, critical patients showed higher high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) during hospitalization than severe patients. However, in the elderly patients, critical patients showed decreased hsCRP during hospitalization and higher proBNP values. The hsCRP fluctuation and proBNP were independent risk factors for intensive care unit (ICU) admission in young and middle-aged severe patients (OR=1.068) and elderly severe patients (OR=1.026), respectively.

Conclusion: The study revealed different potential causes of disease and predictive factors for non-elderly and elderly critical patients and treatment recommendations. Deterioration of inflammatory state was the main cause of ICU admission in young and middle-aged severe COVID-19 patients, while a decline in hsCRP was not associated with better outcomes in elderly severe patients, indicating the need for different treatments for non-elderly and elderly severe patients. Anti-inflammatory therapy with corticosteroids should be considered in the early disease stage among non-elderly severe patients, but cardiovascular protection plays a more important role in elderly severe patients.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.intimp.2020.107343DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7833421PMC
March 2021

The association of diabetes and the prognosis of COVID-19 patients: A retrospective study.

Diabetes Res Clin Pract 2020 Nov 25;169:108386. Epub 2020 Aug 25.

Division of Endocrinology, Department of Internal Medicine, Tongji Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, 1095 Jiefang Ave., Wuhan 430030, China. Electronic address:

Aims: This study evaluated the impact of previous glycemic control and in-hospital use of antidiabetic/antihypertensive drugs on the prognosis of COVID-19 patients with diabetes.

Methods: In this retrospective cohort study, consecutive inpatients with laboratory confirmed COVID-19 were enrolled from Tongji Hospital (Wuhan, China). Patients without diabetes were matched to those with diabetes based on age, sex, and comorbidities. All patients were followed up to a clinical endpoint (discharge, worsening including transferring to ICU or immediate death). Data and outcomes were extracted from medical records and analyzed.

Results: 64 patients with pre-existing diabetes were included in this study, with 128 matched patients without diabetes included as a control group. Patients with diabetes had a higher rate of worsening (18.8% versus 7.8%, p = 0.025). Multivariable regression showed increased odds of worsening associated with previous glycemic control reflected by HbA1c (odds ratio 3.29, 95% CI 1.19-9.13, p = 0.022) and receiver-operating characteristics (ROC) curve identified HbA1c of 8.6% (70 mmol/mol) as the optimal cut-off value. Univariate analysis demonstrated the in-hospital use of antidiabetic/antihypertensive drugs were not associated with a higher risk of worsening.

Conclusions: COVID-19 patients with diabetes had a higher risk of worsening, especially those with poorly-controlled HbA1c, with an optimal cut-off value of 8.6%. The in-hospital use of antidiabetic/antihypertensive drugs were not associated with increased odds of worsening in patients with diabetes.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.diabres.2020.108386DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7445120PMC
November 2020