Publications by authors named "Walter Rambeck"

8 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Effects of a sustained release formulation of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3-glycosides for milk fever prevention on serum 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3, calcium and phosphorus in dairy cows.

J Steroid Biochem Mol Biol 2017 10 23;173:301-307. Epub 2017 Mar 23.

Institute for Animal Nutrition, Ludwig Maximilians University München, D-85764 Oberschleissheim, Germany. Electronic address:

Milk fever (MF) is a metabolic disease in dairy cows around parturition. The clinical lead sign is muscular paresis leading in severe cases to paralysis of the affected animal. Multiparturient animals of high performing dairy breeds are most likely to be affected and have a high probability of recurrence. An acute drop in blood calcium levels causes the disease when the demand for calcium at the onset of lactation exceeds the ability to replete blood calcium levels through mobilization from bone and intestinal uptake. With the understanding of the underlying mechanism, calcium supply management and vitamin D supplementation became prime candidates for MF prevention and therapy. Several strategies have been developed for MF prevention. Application of the active form of Vitamin D, 1,25(OH)D, was found to prevent MF effectively. In order to prevent a delayed hypocalcemia, which was occasionally seen after stopping the treatment with 1,25(OH)D a new approach was chosen by applying Solanum glaucophyllum extract (SGE), which contains 1,25(OH)D-glycosides, as instant-release (irSGE) in combination with slow-release (srSGE) tablets. In a first study, non-lactating cows were treated with a single bolus of either synthetic 1,25(OH)D, irSGE, or srSGE and the results were compared to a control group without treatment. Blood serum levels of 1,25(OH)D (1,25D), calcium (Ca), phosphate (P) and magnesium (Mg) were followed for 11days and the area under the curve (AUC) was calculated. Calcium and phosphate excretion in urine were determined during 15days. While serum concentration of 1,25(OH)D was back to pre-treatment level in the irSGE, srSGE and 1,25(OH)D treated group within 3days, calcium and phosphate levels remained elevated for up to 9days. AUC of serum 1,25(OH)D was 2.89 (1,25D), 3.13 (irSGE) and 4.21 (srSGE) times higher than control. Serum calcium levels were 1.07 (for 1.25D); 1.08 (for irSGE) and 1.12 (for srSGE) times higher than control. Serum phosphate levels were 1.20 (for 1,25D); 1.30 (for irSGE) and 1.41 (for srSGE) times higher than control, with p<0.05. In a second field study calving cows treated with one bolus containing ir- and sr- tablets of SGE were compared to an untreated control group and to a group treated with 4 boli of commercial calcium salts. As a result, calcium serum levels increased (+19% compared to baseline) around calving after treatment with the single bolus of SGE. The single bolus of SGE lead also to an increase of serum phosphate (+31% compared to baseline). These calcium and phosphate increases were statistically significant (p<0.001) 0-24h after calving compared to the control group and to the group treated with calcium salts. The sample size of the study was too small to draw a conclusion on the effect on MF prevention. In conclusion, application of a single bolus of a SGE extract lead to an increase of serum calcium and phosphate for up to 9days and may thus have the potential to prevent a hypocalcemia and -phosphatemia, an important cause for clinical milk fever.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jsbmb.2017.03.020DOI Listing
October 2017

The predictive power of the elimination of dioxin-like pollutants from pigs: an in vivo study.

Environ Int 2012 Jan 22;38(1):73-8. Epub 2011 Sep 22.

Key Lab of Urban Environment and Health, Institute of Urban Environment, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Xiamen, PR China.

Pigs accidentally given feed contaminated by dioxin-like pollutants are a serious public health issue. We have examined whether pigs with limited exposure during early periods of fattening would be categorized as non-compliant with the EU limit at slaughtering when growth-dilution, excretion and metabolism effects are considered. Sixteen female and sixteen castrated male weaned pigs were divided into four groups (e.g. DG0, DG1, DG2 and DG3) in week 2 after birth. From weeks 3 to 13, groups DG1, DG2, and DG3 pigs were fed with a polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxin/dibenzofuran (PCDD/F) and polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) mixture at dosages of 1, 10 and 100ng-toxic equivalent (TEQ) per kg dry mass feed in capsules, respectively. From weeks 13 to 23, the animals were nourished with clear feed. Control group DG0 was always fed with clear feed. Subcutaneous fat samples were collected at weeks 13, 18 and 23 by biopsies. The pollutant residues were analyzed by high resolution gas chromatography-high resolution mass spectrometry and quantified by a (13)C-isotope dilution method. The results showed the following: (1) when slaughtered at week 23, the TEQ for DG1 pigs (0.66±0.21pg/g fat) was under the EU limit of 1pg PCDD/F-TEQ/g fat; (2) PCDD/F congener-specific first-order elimination rates were linearly correlated with their toxicity equivalency factors (TEFs), and the rates were significantly dose-dependent for the more toxic congeners (TEF≥0.1). Therefore, the pigs' exposure above the EU limit during the early fattening stage did not necessarily lead to their categorization as non-compliant pork; and the residual TEQ for pork can be predicted from early exposure concentrations based on the models established here.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.envint.2011.08.009DOI Listing
January 2012

The need for careful interpretation of animal data on lanthanum.

Authors:
Walter Rambeck

Kidney Int 2005 Dec;68(6):2909; author reply 2909-10

View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1523-1755.2005.00583_5.xDOI Listing
December 2005

Beyond deficiency: potential benefits of increased intakes of vitamin K for bone and vascular health.

Eur J Nutr 2004 Dec 5;43(6):325-35. Epub 2004 Feb 5.

Dept. of Biochemistry, University of Maastricht, P. O. Box 616, 6200 MD Maastricht, The Netherlands.

Vitamin K is well known for its role in the synthesis of a number of blood coagulation factors. During recent years vitamin K-dependent proteins were discovered to be of vital importance for bone and vascular health. Recommendations for dietary vitamin K intake have been made on the basis of the hepatic requirements for the synthesis of blood coagulation factors. Accumulating evidence suggests that the requirements for other functions than blood coagulation may be higher. This paper is the result of a closed workshop (Paris, November 2002) in which a number of European vitamin K experts reviewed the available data and formulated their standpoint with respect to recommended dietary vitamin K intake and the use of vitamin K-containing supplements.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00394-004-0480-4DOI Listing
December 2004

Longitudinal in vivo effects of growth hormone overexpression on bone in transgenic mice.

J Bone Miner Res 2004 May 15;19(5):802-10. Epub 2004 Mar 15.

Musculoskeletal Research Group, Institute of Anatomy, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität, München, Germany.

Unlabelled: In this study we examined the effect of systemic overexpression of GH on bone in transgenic mice longitudinally in vivo over a period of 9 months. We observed substantially increased BMC in GH transgenic mice and a significant reduction in serum osteocalcin. GH effects on bone were strongly dependent on gender and developmental stage.

Introduction: State-of-the-art bone marker and microimaging technology was applied in this longitudinal study to examine bone metabolism, BMC, bone density, and cortical bone structure over the life span of growth hormone (GH) transgenic (tg) mice.

Materials And Methods: Thirty-eight mice from four genetic groups (male, female, tg, and controls) were examined with DXA, and their femur and tibia were examined with peripheral QCT (pQCT). Osteocalcin (formation) and collagen cross-links (resorption) from serum and urine were also measured at postnatal weeks 3, 6, 9, 12, 18, 26, and 38.

Results: GH tg mice displayed a significant increase in body weight (up to 50%) and BMC (up to 90%), but serum osteocalcin was significantly reduced compared with controls. GH tg females (but not males) displayed increased trabecular density over controls up to week 12. In contrast, male (but not female) GH tg mice displayed a higher cortical cross-sectional area than controls. Cortical density was significantly lower in both male and female GH tg mice compared with control mice.

Conclusions: The increase in BMC in GH tg mice is associated with reduced serum osteocalcin levels, indicating that bone turnover may be lower than in the control mice. On a structural level, bone responds to GH excess in a gender-specific manner, with alterations varying substantially between different developmental stages.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1359/JBMR.040308DOI Listing
May 2004

Insulin-like growth factor-binding protein-2 (IGFBP-2) overexpression negatively regulates bone size and mass, but not density, in the absence and presence of growth hormone/IGF-I excess in transgenic mice.

Anat Embryol (Berl) 2002 Dec 20;206(1-2):139-48. Epub 2002 Nov 20.

Forschungsgruppe Muskuloskelettales System, Anatomische Anstalt, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München, Pettenkoferstrasse 11, 80336 München, Germany.

Insulin-like growth factor-binding protein-2 (IGFBP-2) has been suggested to be a negative regulator of bone growth and maintenance. The objective of this study was to characterize the effect of elevated IGFBP-2 on the skeletal phenotype of adult transgenic mice, in the absence and presence of growth hormone (GH) excess. 43 male mice were examined at an age of 4 months (7 IGFBP-2 transgenic mice, 12 GH transgenic mice, 10 mice carrying both transgenes, and 14 controls). The bone mineral content of the total skeleton and of isolated bones was quantified by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA), after validation versus ash analysis. Cortical and trabecular bone was quantified by peripheral quantitative computed tomography (pQCT), after validation versus microCT. A strong linear relationship was found between DXA and ash weight, and between pQCT and micro CT ( r>0.95). Bone size and bone mineral content were significantly reduced in IGFBP-2 transgenic mice, the magnitude of the effect varying between skeletal sites and between bone compartments. Elevated IGFBP-2 negatively modulated the GH-stimulated increase in bone size and mineral content, and completely blocked GH-effects at cortical sites. Notably, bone density was not decreased in IGFBP-2 transgenic animals compared with controls. In conclusion, IGFBP-2 is identified as a potent negative regulator of normal and GH-stimulated bone growth in vivo. Interestingly, elevated IGFBP-2 levels did not lead to a decrease in bone density, suggesting that IGFBP-2 negatively affects bone size and mineral content, but not bone maintenance in adult mice.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00429-002-0282-5DOI Listing
December 2002

Estimation of iodine status in cats.

J Nutr 2002 06;132(6 Suppl 2):1751S-3S

Institute for Animal Physiology, Physiological Chemistry and Animal Nutrition, Ludwig-Maximilians-University Munich, Munich, Germany.

View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/jn/132.6.1751SDOI Listing
June 2002

The role of tacrolimus (FK506)-based immunosuppression on bone mineral density and bone turnover after cardiac transplantation: a prospective, longitudinal, randomized, double-blind trial with calcitriol.

Transplantation 2002 Feb;73(4):547-52

Medizinische Klinik, Klinikum Innenstadt, Department of Cardiology, Ludwig-Maximilians University, 80336 Munich, Germany.

Background: Tacrolimus (FK506) is a new immunosuppressive drug in organ transplantation that has demonstrated experimentally to be more deleterious on bone mineral metabolism than cyclosporine. The purpose of this clinical study was to evaluate the effects of a tacrolimus-based immunosuppression on the skeleton and to investigate in a prospective, longitudinal, randomized, double-blind, study the effect of 0.25 microg calcitriol (1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3) versus placebo in the prevention of bone loss and fracture rate after heart transplantion (HTx).

Methods: A total of 53 patients (5 female, 48 male, mean age: 53+/-11 years) were randomized to the study medication. Basic therapy included calcium and sex hormone replacement in hypogonadism. Bone mineral density of the lumbar spine (LS) and femoral neck (FN) were performed at baseline, after 12 and 24 months. Biochemical indexes of mineral metabolism were measured every 3 months.

Results: Overall bone mineral density (BMD) was significantly decreased after HTx (T-score-LS: 89+/-13%; FN: 88+/-14%). LS-BMD (% change in g/cm2) increased significantly within the study period in the calcitriol group (12 months: 7.1+/-8.1%, P<0.01; 24 months: 14.0+/-10.1%, P<0.01) and showed a positive trend in the placebo group (12 months: 4.5+/-9.3%, NS; 24 months: 6.2+/-8.0%, NS). FN-BMD in the calcitriol group was stable (12 months: -2.1+/-4.2%; NS; 24 months: -0.9+/-3.2%, NS). FN-BMD in the placebo group decreased significantly within the first 12 month follow-up period (-7.3+/-5.4; P<0.05) and stabilized within 2 years (-8.0+/-4.1%; P < 0.05). Fracture incidence was low during the study interval (first year: 5.0%, second year: 0%). Bone resorption markers decreased significantly during calcitriol therapy.

Conclusions: High dose tacrolimus-based immunosuppressive regimen is associated with a rapid bone loss early after cardiac transplantation. Beyond the first 6 months after HTx, calcium, vitamin D, and hormone supplementation in hypogonadism lead sufficiently to bone mineral recovery. Besides immunosuppression, both concomitant hypogonadism and secondary hyperparathyroidism play a major role for the bone loss and should be therefore monitored and treated adequately. Low dose calcitriol should be substituted for at least 2 years as additional antiresorptive therapy.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/00007890-200202270-00010DOI Listing
February 2002