Publications by authors named "Walter Martinez"

17 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Effects of GnRH and hCG administration during early luteal phase on estrous cycle length, expression of estrus and fertility in lactating dairy cows.

Theriogenology 2021 Jun 16;173:23-31. Epub 2021 Jun 16.

Department of Medical Sciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Wisconsin, 53706, USA. Electronic address:

Our objective was to determine the effects of a single treatment of human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) or GnRH from d 5 to 7 of the estrous cycle on cycle length, expression of estrus and fertility in lactating dairy cows. Lactating Holstein cows (n = 354) located in Farm 1 and lactating Jersey cows located in Farm 2 (n = 210) detected in estrus by an Automated Activity Monitor (AAM) system from 27 to 50 days in milk (DIM) were randomly assigned to receive one of three treatments from d 5 to 7 of the estrous cycle: control (untreated; CON; Holstein, n = 111; Jersey, n = 66), GnRH (86 μg gonadorelin acetate im; Holstein, n = 116; Jersey, n = 75), or hCG (3,300 IU im; Holstein, n = 127; Jersey, n = 69). Ovaries were scanned with ultrasound in a random subgroup of cows (Holstein/Farm 1, n = 147; Jersey/Farm 2, n = 94) on the day of treatment and 3 or 4 d later to determine ovulation. Estrus was detected after treatment by an AAM, and peak activity and heat index were recorded. A random subgroup of cows observed in estrus after treatment received first AI from 51 to 80 DIM (Holstein, n = 208; Jersey, n = 138). Pregnancy diagnoses were performed by transrectal ultrasonography at 37 ± 3 d post-AI. Holstein and Jersey cows treated with GnRH and hCG had an increased (P < 0.05) ovulatory response compared with controls. Human chorionic gonadotropin decreased (74%; P = 0.05) and GnRH tended to reduce (75%; P = 0.07) the proportion of multiparous Holstein cows returning to estrus compared with CON (86%). Cows treated with hCG had a longer (P < 0.01) estrous cycle length (24.6 ± 0.3 d, Holstein; 23.0 ± 0.3 d, Jersey) compared with CON cows (22.7 ± 0.3 d, Holstein; 21.3 ± 0.3 d Jersey) and GnRH (22.9 ± 0.3 d, Holstein; 21.1 ± 0.3 d Jersey). The percentage of cows with high (≥80) peak activity and heat index did not differ (P > 0.50) between treatments, and milk production did not affect (P > 0.65) the duration of estrus. Pregnancy per AI (P/AI) was not affected by treatments in Holstein (P = 0.93; CON: 34.3%, GnRH: 35.4%, and hCG: 31.5%) and in multiparous Jersey cows (P = 0.35; CON: 34.3%, GnRH: 35.4%, and hCG: 31.5%), but hCG had greater (P = 0.03; 55%) P/AI than GnRH (30.0%) and a trend (P = 0.06) for greater P/AI than CON (33.3%) in primiparous Jersey cows. In summary, inducing the formation of an accessory corpus luteum from d 5 to 7 of the estrous cycle with hCG reduced expression of estrus in multiparous Holstein cows. Moreover, hCG increased estrous cycle length in Holstein and Jersey cows, and it did not affect first service P/AI at 37 ± 3 d post-AI in Holstein and multiparous Jersey lactating cows. However, hCG increased P/AI in primiparous Jersey cows. Future research with a larger number of cows is needed to confirm these intriguing fertility results.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.theriogenology.2021.06.010DOI Listing
June 2021

Concurrent onabotulinumtoxinA treatment of cervical dystonia and concomitant migraine.

Headache 2012 Sep 18;52(8):1219-25. Epub 2012 May 18.

Palm Beach Headache Center, West Palm Beach, FL 33407, USA.

Objective: The objective of this study was to assess the clinical benefits of onabotulinumtoxinA (BOTOX®) treatment on the symptoms of cervical dystonia and the frequency, severity, and associated symptoms of migraine in patients with cervical dystonia and concurrent migraine.

Background: Botulinum toxin is established as first-line treatment of cervical dystonia. Recent clinical trials have shown onabotulinumtoxinA to be an effective prophylactic therapy for patients with chronic migraine, and onabotulinumtoxinA has been approved for use in this patient population by the Food and Drug Administration. Patients with headache associated with cervical dystonia have been identified as a specific subpopulation of patients in whom botulinum toxin treatment may be effective for controlling the symptoms of both conditions.

Methods: An open-label pilot study was conducted for 7.5 months in patients at least 18 years old with primary cervical dystonia of moderate severity (baseline rating of at least 20 on the Toronto Western Spasmodic Torticollis Rating Scale) complicated by migraine headache meeting the International Classification of Headache Disorders-II criteria for migraines with or without aura. Each patient received 2 cycles of treatment at Visit 3 (baseline) and Visit 6 (Day 90). For cervical dystonia, each patient was injected with a maximum of 175 units. At the same visit, a maximum of 125 units was also injected for migraine using a fixed-site, fixed-dose injection paradigm, with additional cervical dystonia injection-site treatment to a maximum dose of 300 units. Patients were assessed following onabotulinumtoxinA injection and at follow-up on Visit 4 (Day 30), Visit 5 (Day 60), Visit 6 (Day 90), and at Visits 7, 8, and 9 (Days 120, 150, and 180). The primary outcome measures for this study were change in Toronto Western Spasmodic Torticollis Rating Scale total score for cervical dystonia and frequency of headache episodes per 28-day period. Migraine episodes were defined as at least 4 hours of sustained pain with no upper limit. An episode was considered new if the patient was pain free for at least 24 hours. Secondary study end points included number of headache days per month, headache intensity, headache disability (assessed using Headache Impact Test-6 and the Migraine Disability Assessment score scales), acute headache medication use, resource utilization, and allodynia pain. Adverse events were reported.

Results: A total of 25 patients (24 women, mean age 50.5 years; mean age of disease onset 21.9 years) were enrolled in the study. Patients experienced improvement in cervical dystonia symptoms with significant reductions from baseline in Toronto Western Spasmodic Torticollis Rating Scale scores at 30, 60, 90, 120, 150, and 180 days (-9.84 ± 8.49, -12.67 ± 8.22, -13.63 ± 7.27, -14.92 ± 7.05, -14.76 ± 6.97, -14.49 ± 6.14, respectively, P < .0001 at all time points from a baseline of 31.03 ± 3.61). Changes from baseline were assessed using the t-test. Reductions in the number of headache episodes from baseline on concurrent onabotulinumtoxinA treatment for coexistent chronic migraine did not attain significance. However, patients experienced significant reductions from baseline in the number of headache days at 90, 120, and 180 days (-3.39 ± 6.78, P = .0289; -4.29 ± 7.94, P = .0194; -4.38 ± 7.99, P = .0178, respectively, from a baseline of 15.33 ± 6.76). Changes from baseline were assessed using the t-test. The change from baseline in Headache Impact Test-6 total scores was significant at 30, 60, 90, 150, and 180 days (3.21 ± 4.14, P = .0009; -3.04 ± 4.04, P = .0012; -2.41 ± 2.79, P = .0006; -2.59 ± 3.87, P = .0050; -3.09 ± 3.80, respectively, from a baseline of 22.68 ± 3.20). Changes from baseline were assessed using the t-test. The change from baseline in Migraine Disability Assessment was significant at 120, 150, and 180 days (-38.09 ± 47.87, P < .0001, Wilcoxon signed rank test; -16.91 ± 62.69, P = .0358, Wilcoxon signed rank test; -23.73 ± 40.57, P = .0122, t-test, respectively, from a baseline of 56.68 ± 50.41). There were no serious adverse events or treatment-related discontinuations.

Conclusions: Concurrent treatment with onabotulinumtoxinA is effective and well tolerated in controlling the symptoms of cervical dystonia complicated by concurrent migraine.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1526-4610.2012.02164.xDOI Listing
September 2012

Association of common genetic variants in GPCPD1 with scaling of visual cortical surface area in humans.

Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 2012 Mar 16;109(10):3985-90. Epub 2012 Feb 16.

Medical Scientist Training Program, University of California at San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093, USA.

Visual cortical surface area varies two- to threefold between human individuals, is highly heritable, and has been correlated with visual acuity and visual perception. However, it is still largely unknown what specific genetic and environmental factors contribute to normal variation in the area of visual cortex. To identify SNPs associated with the proportional surface area of visual cortex, we performed a genome-wide association study followed by replication in two independent cohorts. We identified one SNP (rs6116869) that replicated in both cohorts and had genome-wide significant association (P(combined) = 3.2 × 10(-8)). Furthermore, a metaanalysis of imputed SNPs in this genomic region identified a more significantly associated SNP (rs238295; P = 6.5 × 10(-9)) that was in strong linkage disequilibrium with rs6116869. These SNPs are located within 4 kb of the 5' UTR of GPCPD1, glycerophosphocholine phosphodiesterase GDE1 homolog (Saccharomyces cerevisiae), which in humans, is more highly expressed in occipital cortex compared with the remainder of cortex than 99.9% of genes genome-wide. Based on these findings, we conclude that this common genetic variation contributes to the proportional area of human visual cortex. We suggest that identifying genes that contribute to normal cortical architecture provides a first step to understanding genetic mechanisms that underlie visual perception.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1105829109DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3309762PMC
March 2012

Papular elastorrhexis, a distinctive entity?

Am J Dermatopathol 2008 Apr;30(2):188-90

Department of Dermatology, Hospital Juan Canalejo, La Coruña, Spain.

Papular elastorrhexis is a rare entity of elastic tissue characterized by multiple white papules usually located on the trunk. We report a case of papular elastorrhexis in a 22-year-old man with sparse lesions and discuss the main controversial facts in this entity: its consideration as an independent disease or as an incomplete form of Buschke-Ollendorff syndrome and the confusion with and its possible inclusion as a variant of elastic tissue naevi.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/DAD.0b013e318164edb3DOI Listing
April 2008

What syndrome is this? Brachmann de Lange syndrome.

Pediatr Dermatol 2007 Jul-Aug;24(4):421-3

Department of Dermatology, Hospital Juan Canalejo, La Coruña, Spain.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1525-1470.2007.00466.xDOI Listing
November 2007

Anetodermic mastocytosis: response to PUVA therapy.

J Dermatolog Treat 2007 ;18(3):184-7

Department of Dermatology, Hospital Juan Canalejo, La Coruña, Spain.

Mastocytosis is a group of disorders characterized by the accumulation of mast cells in different tissues and organs. The skin is the most frequently involved organ (90% of cases) where mastocytosis may show a heterogenic clinical expression. Anetodermic lesions are an unusual clinical presentation of mastocytosis. We report a case of anetodermic mastocytosis in a 26-year-old man, with sparse lesions and a benign course. PUVA therapy obtained excellent results in this case. Darier's sign should be investigated in patients with anetodermic lesions of unclear origin in order to exclude cutaneous mastocytosis.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/09546630701258093DOI Listing
July 2007

Neutrophilic dermatosis of the hands: presentation of eight cases and review of the literature.

J Dermatol 2007 Apr;34(4):243-7

Department of Dermatology, Hospital Juan Canalejo, Coruna, Spain.

Pustular dermatosis of the dorsal hands is a peculiar variant of Sweet's syndrome described by Strutton et al. Nevertheless, not all authors accept this entity. We present a retrospective study of eight cases of neutrophilic vasculitis of the hands. Three patients presented with lesions only on the dorsal hands, three with lesions on the palmar surface and two with lesions on the dorsal and palmar surfaces of the hands. The patients with lesions on the dorsal surface presented a pustular aspect, and the histopathological examination revealed a high degree of vascular damage with presence of vasculitis and, in one case, with fibrinoid necrosis. Therefore, the term pustular vasculitis of the dorsal hands introduced by Strutton et al. should probably be conserved. Our cases may have demonstrated a peculiar clinicopathological disease with its own entity.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1346-8138.2007.00261.xDOI Listing
April 2007

Purple nodules and a palatal plaque.

Am J Med 2006 Dec;119(12):1036-8

Department of Dermatology, Hospital Juan Canalejo, La Coruña, Spain.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.amjmed.2006.10.005DOI Listing
December 2006

Efficacy, safety, and tolerability of oxcarbazepine monotherapy.

Epilepsy Behav 2006 Nov 7;9(3):448-56. Epub 2006 Sep 7.

Premiere Research Institute, West Palm Beach, FL, USA.

Objective: This prospective, open-label, multicenter study evaluated the efficacy and tolerability of oxcarbazepine as monotherapy in patients with partial seizures who switched from their current antiepileptic drug (AED) monotherapy because of lack of efficacy or poor tolerability.

Method: Patients (>or=12 years old) experiencing 2-40 seizures per month while receiving an AED were included. During a 16-week treatment phase, oxcarbazepine was initiated (8-10mg/kg for children; 600 mg/day for adults) and titrated up over 4 weeks while the existing AED was tapered off. Improvement in seizure frequency (defined as >or=50% reduction compared with baseline) was evaluated for all patients, as well as the subgroups of patients switched due to poor tolerability or lack of efficacy.

Results: Overall, 52% of patients experienced a 50% reduction in seizure frequency, 35% had a >or=75% reduction, and 18% were seizure-free. The most frequent (>10%) adverse events were dizziness, nausea, headache, somnolence, and fatigue. Overall, 17% of patients prematurely withdrew because of an adverse event; 62% of these withdrawals occurred during the conversion period.

Conclusion: Oxcarbazepine as monotherapy may be a favorable treatment option for patients with partial seizures or poor tolerability of their existing monotherapy regimen.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.yebeh.2006.04.022DOI Listing
November 2006

Lupus erythematosus tumidus: a series of 26 cases.

Int J Dermatol 2006 May;45(5):512-7

Department of Dermatology and Pathology, Hospital Juan Canalejo, La Coruña, Spain.

Objective: To study 26 cases of lupus erythematosus tumidus (LET), a subset of chronic cutaneous lupus erythematosus (CCLE), referred to in the literature as a rare entity.

Patients And Methods: A retrospective study was conducted of 26 patients diagnosed with LET between 1996 and 2002. The clinical characteristics, histopathologic and laboratory findings, response to treatment, association with other subsets of lupus, course, and diagnostic criteria were analyzed.

Results: The incidence by sex was similar. The mean age of presentation was 49.19 years. The clinical presentation usually involved erythematous, edematous plaques located on the face, chest, back, or extremities, related to sun exposure. A dermal lymphocytic infiltrate with a perivascular disposition and differing degrees of mucin deposition was observed in all cases. Minimal epidermal changes were present in 18 cases, and 11 of these also showed minimal dermal-epidermal changes. Only one case showed dermal-epidermal changes without any epidermal alteration. Direct immunofluorescence test was performed in 15 patients, and 11 were negative. All cases showed a benign course without systemic manifestations. The response to topical steroids or antimalarial treatment was excellent, but a seasonal recurrence was usually observed. Discussion No defined criteria for LET are universally accepted. The main controversies are the acceptance of LET as a separate subset of CCLE, and the histopathologic diagnostic features, mainly the presence or absence of epidermal and dermal-epidermal changes in these lesions.

Conclusions: No inflexible histologic criteria should be employed for the diagnosis of LET. This subset of lupus erythematosus is characterized by intense photosensitivity, definite clinical lesions, a benign course, the absence of systemic disease, good response to antimalarial treatment, and a tendency to recur. More studies should be performed in order to establish the true incidence of LET because this subset of CCLE is probably underestimated.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-4632.2004.02574.xDOI Listing
May 2006

Concurrent Sweet's syndrome and leukemia cutis in patients with myeloid disorders.

Int J Dermatol 2005 Aug;44(8):677-80

Department of Dermatology, Hospital Juan Canalejo, A Coruña, Spain.

A 74-year-old woman with chronic auricular fibrillation, arterial hypertension, hypercholesterolemia, ischemic cardiopathy, and peripheral arteriopathy presented with purpuric lesions on the lower limbs (Fig. 1) and, to a lesser extent, on the anterior area of the chest. The mucous membranes were not affected. In 1989, she was diagnosed with anemia that evolved until 1998, when a bone marrow biopsy revealed a myelodysplastic syndrome unclassified in French-American-British Group (FAB). The patient has required periodic transfusions since February 1999. A skin biopsy of the purpuric lesions revealed a leukocytoclastic vasculitis; the lesions cleared with topical corticosteroid treatment. In May 1999, the patient presented with inflammatory and painful lesions localized on the vulva (Fig. 2), which had evolved over several days, without fever. No lesions were observed in other locations. A cutaneous biopsy showed an intense dermal edema and a diffuse and polymorphous dermal infiltrate involving the follicular structures. Exocytosis, spongiosis, and mucin deposits, demonstrated by Alcian blue stain, were observed in the follicular epithelium. Mature neutrophils were predominant in the dermal infiltrate, but a small number of eosinophils and immature cells were also present (Fig. 3). The myelogenous origin of the immature lining cells was further confirmed by positive staining of intracytoplasmic granules with naphthol-ASD chloroacetate sterase (Leder's stain). Vasculitis was not observed. Routine laboratory tests revealed 3030 leukocytes/mm(3) (60% neutrophils), a hemoglobin level of 8.4 g/dL, and 92,000 platelets/mm(3). Treatment with 30 mg/day of prednisone was started, and the lesions cleared slowly within 4 weeks. A new bone marrow biopsy in September 1999 showed a similar appearance to that taken in 1998. The patient died in January 2000 as a result of pneumonia with cardiac and respiratory failure. A 66-year-old man presented with a febrile syndrome that had evolved over 5 days, and painful and pruritic cutaneous lesions on the face and posterior neck (Fig. 4). Three months before, the patient was diagnosed with chronic myelogenous leukemia in acceleration phase. Examination revealed an edematous and erythematous face with pustular lesions on the surface, also involving the neck and the upper part of the back. The histopathologic examination revealed an intense edema and abscesses in the dermis. The infiltrate of these lesions was composed of mature neutrophils with the presence of abundant immature cells with a myelogenous aspect (Fig. 5). Analytical studies revealed 26,130 leukocytes/mm(3) (42% blasts). No specific treatment for Sweet's syndrome was administered and the lesions showed an improvement within 5 days. Eight days after admission, the patient died as a result of acute hemorrhage, before treatment for leukemia was initiated.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-4632.2005.02037.xDOI Listing
August 2005

Eyelash length in HIV-infected patients.

AIDS 2003 Jul;17(11):1695-6

Department of Dermatology, Hospital Juan Canalejo, La Coruña, Spain.

Acquired trichomegaly of the eyelashes in HIV-infected patients usually appears at the late stage of HIV infection. Eyelash length was measured in a series of 204 HIV patients, and no correlation with CD4 cell count, viral load, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention category, and AIDS case criteria was established. Our data support the finding that eyelash trichomegaly is currently uncommon in HIV-infected patients, perhaps because of antiretroviral therapy or an improvement in their immune situation.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/00002030-200307250-00015DOI Listing
July 2003
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