Publications by authors named "Waleri Root"

3 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Multi-Point Flexible Temperature Sensor Array and Thermoelectric Generator Made from Copper-Coated Textiles.

Sensors (Basel) 2021 May 28;21(11). Epub 2021 May 28.

Research Institute for Textile Chemistry and Textile Physics, University of Innsbruck, Hoechsterstrasse 73, 6850 Dornbirn, Austria.

The integration of electrical functionality into flexible textile structures requires the development of new concepts for flexible conductive material. Conductive and flexible thin films can be generated on non-conductive textile materials by electroless metal deposition. By electroless copper deposition on lyocell-type cellulose fabrics, thin conductive layers with a thickness of approximately 260 nm were prepared. The total copper content of a textile fabric was analyzed to be 147 mg per g of fabric, so that the textile character of the material remains unchanged, which includes, for example, the flexibility and bendability. The flexible material could be used to manufacture a thermoelectric sensor array and generator. This approach enables the formation of a sensor textile with a large number of individual sensors and, at the same time, a reduction in the number of electrical connections, since the conductive textile serves as a common conductive line for all sensors. In combination with aluminum, thermoelectric coefficients of 3-4 µV/K were obtained, which are comparable with copper/aluminum foil and bulk material. Thermoelectric generators, consisting of six junctions using the same material combinations, led to electric output voltages of 0.4 mV for both setups at a temperature difference of 71 K. The results demonstrate the potential of electroless deposition for the production of thin-film-coated flexible textiles, and represent a key technology to achieve the direct integration of electrical sensors and conductors in non-conductive material.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/s21113742DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8198943PMC
May 2021

Textile-Integrated Thermocouples for Temperature Measurement.

Materials (Basel) 2020 Jan 31;13(3). Epub 2020 Jan 31.

Research Institute for Textile Chemistry/Physics, University of Innsbruck, Hoechsterstrasse 73, 6850 Dornbirn, Austria.

The integration of conductive materials in textiles is key for detecting temperature in the wearer´s environment. When integrating sensors into textiles, properties such as their flexibility, handle, and stretch must stay unaffected by the functionalization. Conductive materials are difficult to integrate into textiles, since wires are stiff, and coatings show low adhesion. This work shows that various substrates such as cotton, cellulose, polymeric, carbon, and optical fiber-based textiles are used as support materials for temperature sensors. Suitable measurement principles for use in textiles are based on resistance changes, optical interferences (fiber Bragg grating), or thermoelectric effects. This review deals with developments in the construction of temperature sensors and the production of thermocouples for use in textiles. The operating principle of thermocouples is based on temperature gradients building up between a heated and a cold junction of two conductors, which is converted to a voltage output signal. This work also summarizes integration methods for thermocouples and other temperature-sensing techniques as well as the manufacture of conductive materials in textiles. In addition, textile thermocouples are emphasized as suitable and indispensable elements in sensor concepts for smart textiles.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/ma13030626DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7040602PMC
January 2020

Flexible Textile Strain Sensor Based on Copper-Coated Lyocell Type Cellulose Fabric.

Polymers (Basel) 2019 May 2;11(5). Epub 2019 May 2.

Research Institute for Textile Chemistry/Physics, University of Innsbruck, Hoechsterstrasse 73, 6850 Dornbirn, Austria.

Integration of sensors in textile garments requires the development of flexible conductive structures. In this work, cellulose-based woven lyocell fabrics were coated with copper during an electroless step, produced at 0.0284 M copper sulfate pentahydrate, 0.079 M potassium hydrogen L-tartrate, and 0.94 M formaldehyde concentrations. High concentrations led to high homogeneous copper reaction rates and the heterogeneous copper deposition process was diffusion controlled. Thus, the rate of copper deposition did not increase on the cellulose surface. Conductivity of copper coatings was investigated by the resistance with a four probe technique during fabric deformation. In cyclic tensile tests, the resistance of coated fabric (19 × 1.5 cm) decreased from 13.2-3.7 Ω at 2.2 % elongation. In flex tests, the resistance increased from 5.2-6.6 Ω after 5000 bending cycles. After repeated wetting and drying cycles, the resistance increased by 2.6×10. The resistance raised from 11-23 Ω/square with increasing relative humidity from 20%-80%, which is likely due to hygroscopic expansion of fibers. This work improves the understanding of conductive copper coating on textiles and shows their applicability in flexible strain sensors.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/polym11050784DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6572669PMC
May 2019
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