Publications by authors named "W Wirth"

340 Publications

Response letter to the Editor.

Semin Arthritis Rheum 2021 May 8. Epub 2021 May 8.

University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, United States.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.semarthrit.2021.05.001DOI Listing
May 2021

Superficial cartilage transverse relaxation time is associated with osteoarthritis disease progression - data from the FNIH biomarker study of the osteoarthritis initiative.

Arthritis Care Res (Hoboken) 2021 May 10. Epub 2021 May 10.

Department of Imaging and Functional Musculoskeletal Research, Institute of Anatomy and Cell Biology, Paracelsus Medical University Salzburg and Nuremberg, Salzburg, Austria.

Objective: To study whether layer-specific cartilage transverse relaxation time (T2), and/or longitudinal change is associated with clinically relevant knee osteoarthritis (OA) disease progression.

Methods: The FNIH biomarker consortium was a nested case-control study on 600 knees from 600 Osteoarthritis Initiative participants. Progressor knees had both medial tibiofemoral radiographic joint space width (JSW) loss (≥0.7 mm) and a persistent increase in WOMAC pain (≥9 on a 0-100 scale) at 24-48 month from baseline (n=194). Multi-echo spin-echo (MESE) MRIs for cartilage T2 analysis had been acquired in the right knees only (97 progressor knees). These were compared to 104 control knees without JSW or pain progression. 53 knees had JSW progression, and 57 pain progression only. Cartilage thickness segmentations obtained from DESS MRI were matched to MESE MRI, to extract superficial and deep femorotibial cartilage T2. Superficial medial femorotibial compartment (MFTC) T2 at baseline was the primary, and change in deep MFTC T2 between baseline and 12 months the secondary analytic outcome of this post-hoc exploratory study.

Results: Baseline superficial MFTC T2 was significantly elevated in progressor knees (adjusted mean 47.2ms [95% confidence interval [CI] 46.5, 48.0]) and JSW progression only knees (adjusted mean 47.3ms [95% confidence interval [CI] 46.3, 48.3]), respectively, vs non-progressor knees (45.8ms [95% CI 45.0, 46.5]) after adjustment for age, sex, BMI, WOMAC pain, and medial JSN grade (ANCOVA). Change in T2 was not significantly associated with case status.

Conclusions: Baseline superficial, but not deep, medial cartilage T2 is associated with clinically relevant disease progression in knee OA.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/acr.24627DOI Listing
May 2021

The Concurrent Detection of Chelonid Alphaherpesvirus 5 and Papillomavirus 1 in Tumoured and Non-Tumoured Green Turtles.

Animals (Basel) 2021 Mar 5;11(3). Epub 2021 Mar 5.

College of Public Health, Medical and Veterinary Sciences, James Cook University, Townsville, QLD 4814, Australia.

Characterised by benign tumours, fibropapillomatosis (FP) is a debilitating disease that predominantly afflicts the endangered green turtle (). A growing body of histological and molecular evidence has associated FP tumours with Chelonid alphaherpesvirus 5 (ChHV5). However, a recent study which detected both ChHV5 and papillomavirus 1 (CmPV1) DNA in FP tumour tissues has challenged this hypothesis. The present study aimed to establish a probe-based qPCR to assess the wider prevalence of CmPV1 and co-occurrence with ChHV5 in 275 marine turtles foraging in waters adjacent to the east coast of Queensland, Australia: three categories: Group A (FP tumours), Group B (non-tumoured skin from FP turtles) and Group C (non-tumoured skin from turtles without FP). Concurrent detection of ChHV5 and CmPV1 DNA is reported for all three categories, where Group A had the highest rate (43.5%). ChHV5 viral loads in Group A were significantly higher than loads seen in Group B and C. This was not the case for CmPV1 where the loads in Group B were highest, followed by Group A. However, the mean CmPV1 load for Group A samples was not significantly different to the mean load reported from Group B or C samples. Collectively, these results pivot the way we think about FP; as an infectious disease where two separate viruses may be at play.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/ani11030697DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7999010PMC
March 2021

The effects of sprifermin on symptoms and structure in a subgroup at risk of progression in the FORWARD knee osteoarthritis trial.

Semin Arthritis Rheum 2021 04 11;51(2):450-456. Epub 2021 Mar 11.

Leeds Institute of Rheumatic and Musculoskeletal Medicine, University of Leeds, and NIHR Leeds Biomedical Research Centre, Chapel Allerton Hospital, Leeds, UK. Electronic address:

Objective: To assess pain outcomes and cartilage thickness change in a subgroup at risk (SAR) of further progression in the FORWARD trial of knee osteoarthritis patients treated with sprifermin.

Methods: Patients were randomised 1:1:1:1:1 to: sprifermin 100 µg every 6 months (q6mo), 100 µg q12mo, 30 µg q6mo, 30 µg q12mo, or placebo for 18 months. SAR was defined as baseline medial or lateral minimum joint-space width (mJSW) 1.5-3.5 mm and Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) pain score 40-90 units. Follow-up to 3 years was included in the analysis. Treatment benefit was explored by repeated measures, linear dose-effect trends by timepoint.

Results: The SAR comprised 161 (29%) of 549 patients. Mean difference (95% CI) in WOMAC pain at year 3 for sprifermin 100 µg q6mo vs placebo SAR was -8.75 (-22.42, 4.92) for SAR vs 0.97 (-6.22, 8.16) for the intent-to-treat population. SAR placebo patients lost more cartilage over 2 years than the modified ITT (mITT) placebo arm (mean change from baseline, mm [SD]: -0.05 [0.10] vs -0.02 [0.07]). Net total femorotibial joint thickness gain with sprifermin 100 µg q6mo (adjusted mean difference from placebo [95% CI] was similar in the SAR and in the mITT group: 0.06 [0.01, 0.11] vs 0.05 [0.03, 0.07]).

Conclusions: Selection for low mJSW and moderate-to-high pain at baseline resulted in more rapid disease progression and demonstrated translation of structure modification (with maintained net benefit on total cartilage thickness) into symptomatic benefit. This subgroup may represent a target population for future trials.

Clinical Trial Registration: NCT01919164.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.semarthrit.2021.03.005DOI Listing
April 2021

Early anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction does not affect 5 year change in knee cartilage thickness: secondary analysis of a randomized clinical trial.

Osteoarthritis Cartilage 2021 04 4;29(4):518-526. Epub 2021 Feb 4.

Department of Clinical Sciences Lund, Orthopaedics, Lund University, Lund, Sweden. Electronic address:

Objective: To compare 5-year change in femorotibial cartilage thickness in 121 young, active adults with an acute anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tear randomized to a strategy of structured rehabilitation plus early ACL reconstruction (ACLR) or structured rehabilitation plus optional delayed ACLR.

Design: 62 patients were randomized to early ACLR, 59 to optional delayed ACLR. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was acquired within 4 weeks of injury, at two- and 5-years follow-up. Main outcome was 5-year change in overall femorotibial cartilage thickness. Secondary outcomes included the location-independent cartilage ChangeScore, summarizing thinning and thickening in 16 femorotibial subregions. An exploratory as-treated comparison was performed additionally.

Results: Baseline and at least one follow-up MRI were available for 117 patients. Over 5 years, a comparable increase in overall femorotibial cartilage thickness was observed for patients randomized to early ACLR (n = 59) and patients randomized to optional delayed ACLR (n = 58, adjusted mean difference: -5 μm, 95% CI: [-118, 108]μm). However, the location-independent cartilage ChangeScore was greater in those treated with early ACLR than in patients treated with optional delayed ACLR (adjusted mean difference: 403 μm [119, 687]μm). As-treated analysis showed no between-group differences for the main outcome, while the location-independent cartilage ChangeScore was greater for patients treated with early (adjusted mean difference: 632 μm [268, 996]μm) or delayed ACLR (adjusted mean difference: 449 μm [108, 791]μm) than for patients treated with rehabilitation alone.

Conclusions: In young active adults with acute ACL-injury, choice of treatment strategy for the injured ACL did not modify the magnitude of 5-year change in overall femorotibial cartilage thickness.

Trial Registration: ISRCTN84752559.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.joca.2021.01.004DOI Listing
April 2021
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