Publications by authors named "W Wang"

59,699 Publications

Optimization of hydrogen-ion storage performance of tungsten trioxide nanowires by niobium doping.

Nanotechnology 2021 Nov 30. Epub 2021 Nov 30.

Key Laboratory of Low-dimensional Quantum Structures and Quantum Control Ministry of Education College of Physics and Information Science, Hunan Normal University, No 36 of Lushan Road, Yuelu District, Changsha 410081, Changsha, Hunan, 410081, CHINA.

The transport and storage of ions within solid state structures is a fundamental limitation for fabricate more advanced electrochemical energy storage, memristor, and electrochromic devices. Crystallographic shear structure can be induced in the tungsten bronze structures composed of corner-sharing WO6 octahedra by the addition of edge-sharing NbO6 octahedra, which might provide more storage sites and more convenient transport channels for external ions such as hydrogen ions and alkali metal ions. Here, we show that Nb2O5·15WO3 nanowires with long length-diameter ratio, smooth surface, and uniform diameter have been successfully synthesized by a simple hydrothermal method. The Nb2O5·15WO3 nanowires do exhibit more advantages over h-WO3 nanowires in electrochemical hydrogen ion storage such as smaller polarization, larger capacity(71 mAh/g, at 10C, 1C = 100 mA/g), better cycle performance (remain at 99% of the initial capacity after 200 cycles at 100C) and faster H+ diffusion kinetics. Therefore, complex niobium tungsten oxide nanowires might offer great promise for the next generation of hydrogen ion batteries.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1088/1361-6528/ac3e8eDOI Listing
November 2021

Hydroxy-selenomethionine Supplementation Promotes the in vitro Rumen Fermentation of Dairy Cows by Altering the Relative Abundance of Rumen Microorganisms.

J Appl Microbiol 2021 Nov 30. Epub 2021 Nov 30.

State Key Laboratory of Animal Nutrition, Beijing Engineering Technology Research Center of Raw Milk Quality and Safety Control, College of Animal Science and Technology, China Agricultural University, Beijing, 100193, China.

Aims: This study aims to investigate the effect of hydroxy-selenomethionine supplementation on the in vitro rumen fermentation characteristics and microorganisms of Holstein cows.

Methods And Results: Five fermentation substrates, including control (without selenium supplementation, CON), sodium selenite supplementation (0.3 mg kg DM, SS03), and hydroxy-selenomethionine supplementation (0.3, 0.6 and 0.9 mg kg DM, SM03, SM06, and SM09, respectively) were incubated with rumen fluid in vitro. The results showed that in vitro dry matter disappearance and gas production at 48 h was significantly higher in SM06 than SM03, SS03, and CON; propionate and total volatile Fatty Acid (VFA) production was higher in SM06 than CON. Moreover, higher species richness of rumen fluid was found in SM06 than others. Higher relative abundance of Prevotella and Prevotellaceae-UCG-003 and lower relative abundance of Ruminococcus-1 were detected in SM06 than CON. Besides, higher relative abundance of Ruminococcaceae_UCG-005 was found in CON than other treatments.

Conclusions: 0.6 mg kg DM hydroxy-selenomethionine supplementation could increase cumulative gas production, propionate, and total VFAs production by altering the relative abundance of Prevotella, Prevotellaceae-UCG-003, Ruminococcaceae_UCG-005 and Ruminococcus-1, so that it can be used as a rumen fermentation regulator in Holstein cows.

Significance And Impact Of The Study: This study provides an optimal addition ratio of hydroxy-selenomethionine on rumen fermentation and bacterial composition via an in vitro test.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/jam.15392DOI Listing
November 2021

The key role of pulse wave transit time to predict blood pressure variation during anaesthesia induction.

J Int Med Res 2021 Nov;49(11):3000605211058380

Department of Anaesthesiology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Wenzhou Medical University, Wenzhou, Zhejiang Province, China.

Objective: To establish the relationship between pulse wave transit time (PWTT) before anaesthesia induction and blood pressure variability (BPV) during anaesthesia induction.

Methods: This prospective observational cohort study enrolled consecutive patients that underwent elective surgery. Invasive arterial pressure, electrocardiography, pulse oximetry, heart rate and bispectral index were monitored. PWTT and BPV were measured with special software. Anaesthesia was induced with propofol, sufentanil and rocuronium.

Results: A total of 54 patients were included in this study. There was no correlation between BPV and the dose of propofol, sufentanil and rocuronium during anaesthesia induction. Bivariate linear regression analysis demonstrated that PWTT ( = -0.54), age ( = 0.34) and systolic blood pressure ( = 0.31) significantly correlated with systolic blood pressure variability (SBPV). Only PWTT ( = -0.38) was significantly correlated with diastolic blood pressure variability (DBPV). Patients were stratified into high PWTT and low PWTT groups according to the mean PWTT value (96.8 ± 17.2 ms). Compared with the high PWTT group, the SBPV of the low PWTT group increased significantly by 3.4%. The DBPV of the low PWTT group increased significantly by 2.1% compared with the high PWTT group.

Conclusions: PWTT, assessed before anaesthesia induction, may be an effective predictor of haemodynamic fluctuations during anaesthesia induction.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/03000605211058380DOI Listing
November 2021

Peptide-Derived Biosensors and Their Applications in Tumor Immunology-Related Detection.

Anal Chem 2021 Nov 30. Epub 2021 Nov 30.

Key Laboratory of Medical Molecule Science and Pharmaceutics Engineering, Ministry of Industry and Information Technology, Key Laboratory of Cluster Science of Ministry of Education, Beijing Key Laboratory of Photoelectronic/Electro-photonic Conversion Materials, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing 100081, People's Republic of China.

Small-molecular targeting peptides possess features of biocompatibility, affinity, and specificity, which is widely applied in molecular recognition and detection. Moreover, peptides can be developed into highly ordered supramolecular assemblies with boosting binding affinities, diverse functions, and enhanced stabilities suitable for biosensors construction. In this Review, we summarize recent progress of peptide-based biosensors for precise detection, especially on tumor-related analysis, as well as further provide a brief overview of the progress in tumor immune-related detection. Also, we are looking forward to the prospective future of peptide-based biosensors.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/acs.analchem.1c04461DOI Listing
November 2021

Postoperative Chemoradiotherapy With Capecitabine and Oxaliplatin vs Capecitabine for Stage II to III Rectal Cancer: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

JAMA Netw Open 2021 Nov 1;4(11):e2136116. Epub 2021 Nov 1.

State Key Laboratory of Molecular Oncology, Department of Radiation Oncology, National Cancer Center/National Clinical Research Center for Cancer/Cancer Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, Peking Union Medical College, Beijing, China.

Importance: Several studies have explored the efficacy and toxic effects of concurrent 5-fluorouracil (5-FU)- or capecitabine-based chemoradiotherapy (CRT) with or without oxaliplatin in the neoadjuvant setting. Addition of oxaliplatin to 5-FU or capecitabine elicited similar outcomes but with significantly increased toxic effects; however, there is a need for randomized clinical trials comparing 2 CRT regimens for patients receiving CRT in the adjuvant setting.

Objective: To explore the efficacy and toxic effects of oxaliplatin combined with postoperative concurrent capecitabine and radiotherapy (RT) for pathological stage II and III rectal cancer.

Design, Setting, And Participants: This multicenter randomized clinical trial enrolled patients from 7 centers in China between April 1, 2008, and December 30, 2015. Patients with pathologically confirmed stage II and III rectal cancer were randomized (1:1) to receive concurrent CRT with capecitabine or capecitabine plus oxaliplatin. Analysis was conducted from December 31, 2019, to March 15, 2020.

Interventions: RT comprised 45 to 50 Gy in 25 fractions of 1.8 to 2.0 Gy over 5 weeks. In the capecitabine with RT group, concurrent chemotherapy included 2 cycles of capecitabine (1600 mg/m2) on days 1 to 14 and 22 to 35. The capecitabine and oxaliplatin with RT group received identical postoperative RT to that in the capecitabine with RT group combined with capecitabine (1300 mg/m2) on days 1 to 14 and 22 to 35 and a 2-hour infusion of oxaliplatin (60 mg/m2) on weeks 1, 2, 4, and 5. Patients in both groups received adjuvant chemotherapy (capecitabine or fluorouracil and oxaliplatin) after CRT.

Main Outcomes And Measures: The primary end point was 3-year disease-free survival (DFS).

Results: A total of 589 patients (median [IQR] age, 55 [47-52] years; 375 [63.7%] men and 214 [36.3%] women) were enrolled, including 294 patients randomized to the capecitabine with RT group and 295 patients randomized to the capecitabine and oxaliplatin with RT group. Median (IQR) follow-up was 68 (45-96) months. Most patients had stage III disease (574 patients [75.9%]). Three-year DFS was 76.3% for the capecitabine with RT group and 74.1% for the capecitabine and oxaliplatin with RT group, and 5-year DFS was 72.0% for the capecitabine with RT group and 71.1% for the capecitabine and oxaliplatin with RT group (hazard ratio [HR], 1.07; 95% CI, 0.79-1.44; P = .68). There was no significant difference between groups in overall survival (HR, 0.93; 95% CI, 0.64-1.34; P = .70) or local recurrence (HR, 0.61; 95% CI, 0.31-1.22; P = .16). More grade 3 and 4 acute toxic effects were observed in the capecitabine and oxaliplatin with RT group than in the capecitabine with RT group (114 patients [38.6%] vs 84 patients [28.6%]; P = .01).

Conclusions And Relevance: This randomized clinical trial found that addition of oxaliplatin to capecitabine-based postoperative CRT did not improve the efficacy of treatment but increased the risk of severe acute toxic effects. This finding highlights the basic role of postoperative capecitabine with RT for patients with locally advanced rectal cancer.

Trial Registration: ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00714077.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1001/jamanetworkopen.2021.36116DOI Listing
November 2021
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