Publications by authors named "W S Cail"

46 Publications

Large margin aggregation of local estimates for medical image classification.

Med Image Comput Comput Assist Interv 2014 ;17(Pt 2):196-203

Medical images typically exhibit complex feature space distributions due to high intra-class variation and inter-class ambiguity. Monolithic classification models are often problematic. In this study, we propose a novel Large Margin Local Estimate (LMLE) method for medical image classification. In the first step, the reference images are subcategorized, and local estimates of the test image are computed based on the reference subcategories. In the second step, the local estimates are fused in a large margin model to derive the similarity level between the test image and the reference images, and the test image is classified accordingly. For evaluation, the LMLE method is applied to classify image patches of different interstitial lung disease (ILD) patterns on high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) images. We demonstrate promising performance improvement over the state-of-the-art.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-10470-6_25DOI Listing
January 2015

MRI changes during water loading in patients with polydipsia and intermittent hyponatremia.

Am J Psychiatry 1999 Jun;156(6):958-60

Clinical Studies Unit, Western State Hospital, Staunton, Va., USA.

Objective: Patients with polydipsia and intermittent hyponatremia have greater ventricle-brain ratios (VBRs) than matched patients without polydipsia and intermittent hyponatremia and normal subjects. Unlike previous studies, this study controlled for the impact of water loading when examining the volume of intracranial structures.

Method: Under controlled conditions, eight male schizophrenic patients with polydipsia and intermittent hyponatremia were first assigned to either normal fluid intake or oral water loading and then the alternative condition the following day. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) volumetric measurements were made with the use of a standardized protocol.

Results: During water loading, total VBR and lateral ventricle volume significantly decreased by 13.1% and 12.6%, respectively. A strong association between change in serum sodium concentration and change in VBR was noted across conditions.

Conclusions: These findings indicate that 1) water loading does not account for the diminished brain volume observed in patients with polydipsia and intermittent hyponatremia in previous studies, and 2) hyponatremia can significantly alter brain morphology on MRI.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1176/ajp.156.6.958DOI Listing
June 1999

Severe circumscribed cortical atrophy in Huntington's disease.

Neurology 1998 Aug;51(2):638-9

Department of Neurology, Medical College of Georgia, Augusta, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1212/wnl.51.2.638DOI Listing
August 1998

Posterior fossa hemorrhage after supratentorial surgery.

AJNR Am J Neuroradiol 1997 Sep;18(8):1573-80

Department of Radiology, University of Virginia Health Sciences Center, Charlottesville 22908, USA.

Purpose: To evaluate the imaging findings, possible pathogenesis, and frequency of hemorrhage near the tentorial surface of the cerebellum after supratentorial surgery.

Methods: Over a 5-year period, 13 patients with posterior fossa hemorrhage after supratentorial surgery were identified with postoperative CT studies, which were obtained in all patients after craniotomy. Four of the 13 patients also had postoperative MR examinations. Preoperative and postoperative radiologic studies and medical records were reviewed.

Results: All hemorrhages were located along the superior aspect of the cerebellum transversely oriented along the cerebellar fossa and fissures. None of the patients had coagulopathy or radiologic evidence of posterior fossa tumor or vascular malformation. None of the hemorrhages had an appearance typical of hypertensive hemorrhage. Ten patients (77%) had lumbar drains placed before surgery and all had epidural drains placed at the conclusion of surgery. One patient had surgery for a meningioma, and 12 had surgery for aneurysms. The frequency of hemorrhage after aneurysmal surgery was 3.5%. No neurologic deficits developed referable to the cerebellum.

Conclusions: Hemorrhage should be viewed as a potentially benign sequela of surgery rather than as an indication of hypertension, aneurysm, or previously unrecognized vascular malformation or neoplasm.
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September 1997

Cerebral hemiatrophy: classification on the basis of MR imaging findings of mesial temporal sclerosis and childhood febrile seizures.

Authors:
J E Dix W S Cail

Radiology 1997 Apr;203(1):269-74

Department of Radiology SGSX, David Grant Medical Center, Travis Air Force Base, CA 94535-1800, USA.

Purpose: To classify cerebral hemiatrophy on the basis of childhood febrile seizures and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging findings of mesial temporal sclerosis.

Materials And Methods: Medical records and brain MR images obtained in 23 patients aged 1-64 years with cerebral hemiatrophy were retrospectively reviewed. Age, neurologic deficit, and history of childhood febrile seizures were recorded and correlated with MR findings of mesial temporal sclerosis, focal cortical or white matter signal intensity abnormalities, ipsilateral thalamic or contralateral cerebellar atrophy, and compensatory calvarial changes.

Results: Eleven patients had MR mesial temporal sclerosis findings. Of these, nine had a history of childhood febrile seizures. Of the other 12 patients, only one had a history of childhood febrile seizures. All patients without mesial temporal sclerosis had focal parenchymal lesions in the distribution of the middle cerebral artery.

Conclusion: Two patterns of central nervous system involvement in cerebral hemiatrophy are suggested: (a) MR mesial temporal sclerosis findings and a history of childhood febrile seizures and (b) no MR mesial temporal sclerosis findings and rarely a history of childhood febrile seizures. This correlates with previous descriptions of cerebral hemiatrophy (a) with multifocal neuronal loss after seizures and (b) with a more focal cerebral hemisphere abnormality usually due to vascular insult.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1148/radiology.203.1.9122406DOI Listing
April 1997