Publications by authors named "W Ryan Diver"

136 Publications

Association between Smoking Cannabis and Quitting Cigarettes in a Large American Cancer Society Cohort.

Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev 2021 Oct 4;30(10):1956-1964. Epub 2021 Aug 4.

American Cancer Society, Atlanta, Georgia.

Background: Cannabis use is increasing, including among smokers, an at-risk population for cancer. Research is equivocal on whether using cannabis inhibits quitting cigarettes. The current longitudinal study investigated associations between smoking cannabis and subsequently quitting cigarettes.

Methods: Participants were 4,535 adult cigarette smokers from a cohort enrolled in the American Cancer Society's Cancer Prevention Study-3 in 2009-2013. Cigarette quitting was assessed on a follow-up survey in 2015-2017, an average of 3.1 years later. Rates of quitting cigarettes at follow-up were examined by retrospectively assessed baseline cannabis smoking status (), and by frequency of cannabis smoking among recent cannabis smokers (: ≤3 days/month; : 4-19 days/month; : ≥20 days/month). Logistic regression models adjusted for sociodemographic factors, smoking- and health-related behaviors, and time between baseline and follow-up.

Results: Adjusted cigarette quitting rates at follow-up did not differ significantly by baseline cannabis smoking status [never 36.2%, 95% confidence interval (CI), 34.5-37.8; former 34.1%, CI, 31.4-37.0; recent 33.6%, CI, 30.1-37.3], nor by frequency of cannabis smoking (low 31.4%, CI, 25.6-37.3; moderate 36.7%, CI, 30.7-42.3; high 34.4%, CI, 28.3-40.2) among recent baseline cannabis smokers. In cross-sectional analyses conducted at follow-up, the proportion of cigarette smokers intending to quit smoking cigarettes in the next 30 days did not differ by cannabis smoking status ( = 0.83).

Conclusions: Results do not support the hypothesis that cannabis smoking inhibits quitting cigarette smoking among adults.

Impact: Future longitudinal research should include follow-ups of >1 year, and assess effects of intensity/frequency of cannabis use and motivation to quit on smoking cessation.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-20-1810DOI Listing
October 2021

Frequency of Pathogenic Germline Variants in Cancer-Susceptibility Genes in the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study.

JNCI Cancer Spectr 2021 Apr 23;5(2):pkab007. Epub 2021 Jan 23.

Basic Research Subdirection, Instituto Nacional de Cancerología (INCan), Mexico City, Mexico.

Background: Pediatric cancers are the leading cause of death by disease in children despite improved survival rates overall. The contribution of germline genetic susceptibility to pediatric cancer survivors has not been extensively characterized. We assessed the frequency of pathogenic or likely pathogenic (P/LP) variants in 5451 long-term pediatric cancer survivors from the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study.

Methods: Exome sequencing was conducted on germline DNA from 5451 pediatric cancer survivors (cases who survived ≥5 years from diagnosis; n = 5105 European) and 597 European cancer-free adults (controls). Analyses focused on comparing the frequency of rare P/LP variants in 237 cancer-susceptibility genes and a subset of 60 autosomal dominant high-to-moderate penetrance genes, for both case-case and case-control comparisons.

Results: Of European cases, 4.1% harbored a P/LP variant in high-to-moderate penetrance autosomal dominant genes compared with 1.3% in controls (2-sided  = 3 × 10). The highest frequency of P/LP variants was in genes typically associated with adult onset rather than pediatric cancers, including , , , , and . A statistically significant excess of P/LP variants, after correction for multiple tests, was detected in patients with central nervous system cancers (, , , ), Wilms tumor (, ), non-Hodgkin lymphoma (), and soft tissue sarcomas (, , , , ) compared with other pediatric cancers.

Conclusion: In long-term pediatric cancer survivors, we identified P/LP variants in cancer-susceptibility genes not previously associated with pediatric cancer as well as confirmed known associations. Further characterization of variants in these genes in pediatric cancer will be important to provide optimal genetic counseling for patients and their families.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/jncics/pkab007DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8023430PMC
April 2021

Discovery and fine-mapping of height loci via high-density imputation of GWASs in individuals of African ancestry.

Am J Hum Genet 2021 04 12;108(4):564-582. Epub 2021 Mar 12.

The Charles R. Bronfman Institute for Personalized Medicine, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY 10029, USA.

Although many loci have been associated with height in European ancestry populations, very few have been identified in African ancestry individuals. Furthermore, many of the known loci have yet to be generalized to and fine-mapped within a large-scale African ancestry sample. We performed sex-combined and sex-stratified meta-analyses in up to 52,764 individuals with height and genome-wide genotyping data from the African Ancestry Anthropometry Genetics Consortium (AAAGC). We additionally combined our African ancestry meta-analysis results with published European genome-wide association study (GWAS) data. In the African ancestry analyses, we identified three novel loci (SLC4A3, NCOA2, ECD/FAM149B1) in sex-combined results and two loci (CRB1, KLF6) in women only. In the African plus European sex-combined GWAS, we identified an additional three novel loci (RCCD1, G6PC3, CEP95) which were equally driven by AAAGC and European results. Among 39 genome-wide significant signals at known loci, conditioning index SNPs from European studies identified 20 secondary signals. Two of the 20 new secondary signals and none of the 8 novel loci had minor allele frequencies (MAF) < 5%. Of 802 known European height signals, 643 displayed directionally consistent associations with height, of which 205 were nominally significant (p < 0.05) in the African ancestry sex-combined sample. Furthermore, 148 of 241 loci contained ≤20 variants in the credible sets that jointly account for 99% of the posterior probability of driving the associations. In summary, trans-ethnic meta-analyses revealed novel signals and further improved fine-mapping of putative causal variants in loci shared between African and European ancestry populations.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ajhg.2021.02.011DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8059339PMC
April 2021

Breast cancer risk factors by mode of detection among screened women in the Cancer Prevention Study-II.

Breast Cancer Res Treat 2021 Apr 4;186(3):791-805. Epub 2021 Jan 4.

Behavioral and Epidemiology Research Program, American Cancer Society, 250 Williams Street, Atlanta, GA, 30303, USA.

Background: Identifying risk factors for women at high risk of symptom-detected breast cancers that were missed by screening would enable targeting of enhanced screening regimens. To this end, we examined associations of breast cancer risk factors by mode of detection in screened women from the Cancer Prevention Study (CPS)-II Nutrition Cohort.

Methods: Among 77,206 women followed for a median of 14.8 years, 2711 screen-detected and 1281 symptom-detected breast cancer cases were diagnosed. Multivariable-adjusted associations were estimated using joint Cox proportional hazards regression models with person-time calculated contingent on screening.

Results: Factors associated with higher risks of symptom-detected and screen-detected breast cancer included current combined hormone therapy (HT) use (HR 2.07, 95% CI 1.72-2.48 and 1.45, 1.27-1.65, respectively) and history of benign breast disease (1.85, 1.64-2.08 and 1.43, 1.31-1.55, respectively). Current estrogen-only HT use was associated with symptom-detected (1.40, 1.15-1.71) but not screen-detected (0.95, 0.83-1.09) breast cancer. Higher risk of screen-detected but not symptom-detected breast cancer was observed for obese vs. normal body mass index (1.22, 1.01-1.48 and 0.76, 0.56-1.01, respectively), per 3 h/day sitting time (1.10, 1.04-1.16 and 0.97, 0.89-1.06, respectively), and ≥ 2 drinks per day vs. nondrinker (1.40, 1.16-1.69 and 1.27, 0.97-1.66, respectively).

Conclusions: Differences in risk factors for symptom-detected vs. screen-detected breast cancer were observed and most notably, use of combined and estrogen-only HT and a history of benign breast disease were associated with increased risk of symptomatic detected breast cancer.

Impact: If confirmed, these data suggest that such women may benefit from more intensive screening to facilitate early detection.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10549-020-06025-2DOI Listing
April 2021

Outdoor air pollution and cancer: An overview of the current evidence and public health recommendations.

CA Cancer J Clin 2020 Aug 25. Epub 2020 Aug 25.

Health Effects Institute, Boston, Massachusetts.

Outdoor air pollution is a major contributor to the burden of disease worldwide. Most of the global population resides in places where air pollution levels, because of emissions from industry, power generation, transportation, and domestic burning, considerably exceed the World Health Organization's health-based air-quality guidelines. Outdoor air pollution poses an urgent worldwide public health challenge because it is ubiquitous and has numerous serious adverse human health effects, including cancer. Currently, there is substantial evidence from studies of humans and experimental animals as well as mechanistic evidence to support a causal link between outdoor (ambient) air pollution, and especially particulate matter (PM) in outdoor air, with lung cancer incidence and mortality. It is estimated that hundreds of thousands of lung cancer deaths annually worldwide are attributable to PM air pollution. Epidemiological evidence on outdoor air pollution and the risk of other types of cancer, such as bladder cancer or breast cancer, is more limited. Outdoor air pollution may also be associated with poorer cancer survival, although further research is needed. This report presents an overview of outdoor air pollutants, sources, and global levels, as well as a description of epidemiological evidence linking outdoor air pollution with cancer incidence and mortality. Biological mechanisms of air pollution-derived carcinogenesis are also described. This report concludes by summarizing public health/policy recommendations, including multilevel interventions aimed at individual, community, and regional scales. Specific roles for medical and health care communities with regard to prevention and advocacy and recommendations for further research are also described.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3322/caac.21632DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7904962PMC
August 2020
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